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Full text of "Pennsylvania grange news"

Title: Pennsylvania grange news, v.2, no. 1-8, 10-12 
Place of Publication: Chambersburg, Pa. 



Copyright Date: 1905/1906 



L>-. 



Master Negative Storage Number: MNS# PSt SNPaAg119.2 



Volume: 2 



J 



no. 





J 



1905 




10-12 
1906 



"Officers of the Pennsylvama State Grange 

Master, 'W.F.HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 

Overaeer.jHON. A. C. BARRETT, NewMilford, Susquehanna Co. 

Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Co. 

Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, GoshenviUe, Chester Co. 
Chaplain, REV. J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 
Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 
Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 
Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 
Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 
Flora, MRS. J. S. Dale, State College, Centre Co. 
Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHER, Lincoln University, Chester Co. 
L. A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, MiUvillage, Erie Co. 



Executive Committee 

J. FRANK CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg;, Columbia Co. 

G. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



Finance Committee 

D. B. Mc WILLIAMS, Burnham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

JOHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co. 



L.eBislative Committee 

W. F. HILL. Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Coluihbia Co; 
E.B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



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Pennsylvania Granges are going to add 10,000 members this year 

THIS MEANS WORK. 



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xnnm 



Tubltsh^d bg th^ T:ennsgluanm ^tuU (grange 




VOL. II. No. J 



AUGUST, J905 



20 Cents per Year. 
5 Cents per Copy 



Editor. 
G. yV^. OSTER, V^. T. CREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department, Editor I^egislative Committee Department 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered Atigust 9, 1904, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16 ,1904. 



"SHIP AHOY." 



Sometimes it is interesting to reminisce a little on one's experiences and 
as I have been meditating upon what I might write that would be of interest 
to the readers of "Pennsylvania Grange News" it has occur-red to me that I 
might speak something about my recent travels. Within the past year it has 
been my fortune to traverse our own country from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
and back; and later to have at least a glimpse at two other continents- 
Africa and Europe, but in this I will refer only to the water transportation. 

The most novel experience to a "land lubber" like myself was had in the 
three weeks I spent upon the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, and the Adriatic 
Seas, The ocean going vessels of to-day are provided with all of' the comfort.*? 
of home life upon the land and in addition one gets that rest and recreation, 
which some of us, at least, feel that a busy life will not enable us to take 
while at home. When a large ocean liner is ready to leave New York port, 
her hold contains tons upon tons, and carload after carload of freight, coal, 
and provisions. The passengers may number all told one, two, or three thous- 
and, while the crew necessary to operate the vessel in all of its different de- 
partments will number from two to five hundred men. 

The steamer upon which Trailed had two smoke-stacks, t\vo sets of boil- 
ers and engines, as well as pi;opellers that were entirely independent of each- 
other. Should an accident befall any portion of the machinery in one equip- 
ment, the vessel would not drift at sea but would be driven forward by the 
other equipment. 

The ocean itself Avas the object most studied during the voyage, as it was 
always present and presented a great variety of aspects. For some hours its 
surface would appear almost as smooth and as transparent as glass. Then 
without visible cause it would break and become choppy. This choppy con- 
dition would perhaps give way to one Where larger waves with an undulating 
motion would seem to glory in the possession of a reserve force too large for 
measurement. As their strength, size and height would increase, the troughs 
between them would be correspondingly deeper and one could n-ot help but 
feel how weak and helpless was man and his invention in comparison with 
this power, which seems to be allied to infinity itself. 

Sunday afternoon. May 14th, at 4 p. m,, I stood clinging to the ship'js 
railings as the s,ea lashed its sides so furiously as to occasionally break over 
even the upper deck. The chairs and every lopse thing were roped or other- 
wise fastened down. To walk or sit withoul? holding to something was im- 



possible as the Ship rolled first to one side and then to the other. Lots of 
dishes and glassware in kitchen, dining-room, and elsewhere were broken. 
Baggage in our state rooms slid from side to side, while the poor unfortunates 
who were seasick could not keep their mouths in onp place long enough to 
hit even a washtub. For three days the sea was so rough that what was 
called "mats" were used on the dining tables. These are made the size of 
the table and hook, over its edge. They are designed like the fillers in an egg 
crate and dishes were set in the squares and in this way were kept from slid- 
ing off the tables. While a good many of the passengers had no inclination 
to visit the dining-room, to my surprise my health and appetite continued 
good and I did not miss a meal. In New York harbor the ship had looked to 
me as being grand, powerful and immense. In such a sea it no longer ap- 
pealed to me as a powerful, resisting agency. It now seemed light and help- 
less as a chip and the huge waves would hoist it so high that the propellers 
would whirr in .the air, entirely above and out of the water for some moments 
at a time. I will not soon forget the grandeur and sublimity of this scene. 
Should one be afiiicted with the "big head" or a spirit oj conceit, an exper- 
ience of this kind will show him his own utter helplessness. One's trust must 
be elsewhere than in himself. 

Gradually the storm abated and the sea became quiet. For four days we 
had not seen vessel, land, or animal life, aside frorh our own company. We 
now encountered a school of porpoise fish and our pleasure seemed to be 
equalled by their enjoyment of the experience. They would swim close to the 
surface, being visible under the water. Then come up, turn over, show the 
white shiny sides, then under and up out again. As they went bobbing along 
out away from the vessel, they reminded me of several cotton-tails running, 
bobbing along. 

Ir^ the Mediterranean a whale swam by the side of the vessel in our di- 
rection and not more than one hundred feet from us. After spouting he would 
disappear but presently come up again and be exposed full length on the sur- 
face of the sea. 

Cape St. Vincent, Portugal, was the first continental land sighted and 
there is a lighthouse and signal station here on the rocky and abrupt coast. 
As we entered the Strait of Gibraltar, Tangiers and other cities of Africa 
loomed into view, while back of them ranged the foot-hills of the Atlas 
Mountains. At the inner end of the Strait of Gibraltar stands the famous 
fortress of that name and which is occupied by British troops^ This fortress 
looks like the pictures one may see of it in almost every magazine. As though 
Great Britain felt that the rock was not sufficiently impregnable in itself, she 
has a large fleet of gunboats lying at anchor back of the fort in the harbor of 
Gibraltar. 

A good orchestra was aboard ship and besides furnishing music during 
the dinner hour, gave one or two concerts each day. Games, and dancing when 
calm enough, afforded amusement. Landing at Naples, in Southern Italy, I 
passed up through the continent of Europe and crossing over via the 
English Channel, sailed for home from Southampton, England, on the steam- 
er, St. Louis, of the American Line.. This steamer was built at Cramp's ship- 
yard, Philadelphia, I think five years ago, and one of the draftsmen who de- 
signed part of her machinery was, with his wife, among our passengers. 
Lighted throughout by electricity and provided with electric bells, the steward 
of your room is within call at all times of the day or night. I enjoyed very 
much the baths I had each morning in the large bath tub filled with salt 
water, finishing off with a wash from the spray overhead. 

The vessel was equipped with the Macroni wireless telegraph system and 
there was hardly a day during the voyage that we did not receive the im- 
portant news happening throughout the world. Owing to the expense the 
news was, of course, condensed, but by the time the passengers were ready 



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for their breakfasts, the daily paper, which was made up and printed on 
board ship, was ready for him, being distributed free to the passengers. The 
death and burial of John Hay, the developments in the Russian-Japanese 
War, the progress of peace negotiations, etc., etc., were received by us, mid- 
ocean, perhaps before they reached the homes of many of the readers of the 
"Pennsylvania Grange News." To say that this is marvelous is not over- 
stating the matter in the least. The cost of transportation is just about two 
hundred dollars, while the tips one must figure upon paying amount to fif- 
teen or twenty dollars more. Each vessel has a physician, medical supplies, 
a hospital, writing room, library, barber, etc., aboard- As evidence that pas- 
sengers received good care on board ship,, I give the following bill of fare for 
luncheon, Thursday, July 6th. 



Sardines 



Anchovies 



Pot au Feu 



Curried Chicken and Rice 

Roast Leg of Mutton, Red Currant Jelly 

Noodles a I'ltalienne Baked Potatoes 



Broiled Chops and Steaks to Order (15 minutes) 



C O LD 

Roast Lamb and Mint Sauce 
Turkey and Ham German Sausage 

Roast Beef 

Ox Tongue Benoist Beef 

Pate de Foie Gras 



Assorted Pickles 



Lemon Meringue Pie 

Sandwich Pastry 



Romaine Sala^ 
Stewed Figs 



CHEESE 



Cheddar 



Fruit 



Camembert 

Coffee 



This is an average menu Everything was well cooked and nicely served. 
Bouillon or tea was also served between meals. 

Reaching New Tork harbor evening of July 8th we were halted in the 
Bay by quarantine officials and U. S. Custom Officers. In a couple of hours 

we had satisfied their claims and with light and happy hearts we returning 

American passengers greeted our native country "The land of the free and the 

home of the brave." Fraternally, 

W. F. HILL. 



The Black Ball. 

Study well your obligation, and you 
will see that there need be no candi- 
dates rejected, if due care is exercised 
in bringing in the applications. It 
may be well for the master and the 
secretary to look over the applications 
together, before they are read in 
Grange. If they deem any application 
unsuitable, let the master go to the 
members recommending it, and, with 
all kindness and tact, suggest a delay 
of one meeting. 

This will give those recommending 



the name, time to 1 aquire among the 
members, and to discover any adverse 
sentiment. Sometimes a few words 
of explanation will cause a name to 
be withdrawn quietly. If an unsuit- 
able application be forced to a ballot, 
then it is your duty to use the black 
ball. But remember it is a power 
only to be used with hesitation, and 
for a sound moral reason. The black 
ball is a two-edged weapon, that may 
injure the Grange as well as the can- 
didate. — "Orange Grange Bulletin." 



Executive ^ommittte ^e^drtmetft 

G. W. OSTER, Editor. 



The Harvest. 

As the summer is now about end- 
ed, we ask , ourselves the question, 
"What shall the harvest be ?" 

The answer is plain and simple : 
"It will be largely what we make 
it." 

There is a great harvest of farm- 
ers and those identified with agricul- 
ture in Pennsylvania that needs to be 
gathered and garnered into the 
Grange fold. The question is, How 
can this be done ? There is no other 
way that I can suggest than by work. 
If we would reap a large harvest of 
patrons in 190 5, we must sow seed 
and work for it. 

The Worthy Master early in the 
year asked for an increase of 10,- 
000 in the membership in Pennsyl- 
vania. Can it be done ? Yes; if 
each one of us does his or her part 
to get them. Each one of us has 
more or less influence over some o' 
our friends and neighbors and many 
new members can be had for the ask- 
ing. Perhaps a little persuasion may 
be necessary. Some of course, are 
hard to get, and perhaps, can never 
be induced to unite with the Grange, 
but many there be that can be had 
simply for the asking. 

This is the main object of our 
series of picnics. The picnic cam- 
paign can and will do much toward 
creating an interest among the people 
in the localities in which they are 
held. Each locality is, of course, ex- 
pected to provide some local talent, 
to help fill in the program. But the 
work must not stop there- W^ must 
follow up closely with earnest, active, 
energetic work. Wait upon your 
neighbors with applications and ask 
them to sign and give you the fee 
and help the good work along. 

Get enthused yourself and try to 
make everybody else feel the same way 
and you will in this way be able to 
get nearly everybody. I have had 
considerable experience with picnics 
myself and know something about it. 

Twenty years ago my Grange be- 
gan holding annual one day outing 



picnics. The thing grew and waxed 
strong and was more largely attend- 
ed each year. Then we held a two- 
days' picnic, but soon found that even 
that was not sufficient and for a 
number of years we have been hold- 
ing a four-days' picnic and it is run 
as an encampment. Our attendance 
is about 40,00,0 during the four days. 
About two thousand horses are on 
the grounds on Thursday (Grange 
Day) many of them driving as far aa 
30 or 40 miles to get there. 

Our National Meeting. 

It will not be long before we have 
another national meeting which, will 
be held in Atlantic City, N. J. 

Patrons in Eastern • United States 
are anticipating a great and good 
time. Nothing gives the patron more 
pleasure than meeting fellow patrqns 
in these national and State meetings. 
To meet with and converse with our 
friends who are engaged in the same 
work is d pleasure. Let us all begin 
now to see what a great time we can 
have. Make the coming national ses- 
sion the most harmonious meeting 
and the best business meeting ever 
held. 

Any meeting wmII be harmonious if 
run on strictly business lines. It is 
sure^at if attention is given strictly 
to business tlaere will be no time to 
loof after politics or to become poli- 
ticians for the purpose of gaining 
place or power. No man is large 
enough to fill the smallest place if it 
is obtained by scheming methods. 

Pennsylvania Patrons will be 
specially interested in the above an- 
nouncement taken from The Farm 
Stock Journal, the meeting to be held 
near our borders,, convening Novem- 
ber 15th. Many Patrons will begin 
planning at once to enjoy this great 
event. As Atlantic City is looked upon 
as a fashionable seaside resort for 
Eastern United States, our New Jer- 
sey brethren will probably make this 
"the swellest" meeting of the National 
Grange in recent years. It will be an 
opportunity to wear one's be^t "bib 
and tucker" and also to see the hand^ 
some new robes and paraphernalia 
used in the conferring of the seventh 
degree. 




Scattering Granules Concerning Grangers. 



At a recent meeting of Juniata 
Grange, Blair County, 140 members 
were present and 23 new ones initiat- 
ed, and yet it is only a little while 
since that Grange felt enough dis- 
couraged to throw up its charter. 
Where there is the right kind of stuff 
in even a few members, they can feel 
sure of coming out with flying colors 
sooner or later. 

The following is taken from a fra- 
ternal exchange. How will It do as a 
Receipt for a good Grange ? 

Grit 
Vim 
Push 
Snap 
Energy 
Morality 
Cordiality 
Talk about it 
Write about it 
Speak well of it 
Help to improve it 
Subscribe for its papers 
Help all public enterprises 
Make the atmosphere healthy 
Faith exhibited by good works 
Fire all loafers, croakers, deadbeats 
Let your object be the welfare, growth 
and promotion of the order and its 
members. Speak well of the right 
spirited men, and also be one your- 
self. 




From reports in the daily local 

papers of the Pomona Grange picnic 
held at Lenape, Chester County, Aug. 
3d, it appears that the Grange and 
Grange doctrines had full swing. Re- 
ports state that there were over 2,000 
people present, and the exercises pre- 
sided over by Sister Frances W. 
Broomall were of high order. The 
principal speakers were Sister Holli- 
day, of Tioga County, Past Ceres of 
the State Grange; Bro. Hon. N. B. 
Critchfleld, Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture; Bro. Hon. W.T. 
Creasy, Secretary of the Legislative 
Committee of the State Grange; and 
Bro. Dr. B. H. Warren, State Dairy 
and Food Commissioner. In addition 
there were recitations and plenty of 
music. 



Dr. Warren stated that he was 
convinced that the man who had the 
contract to furnish butter to the 
League Island Navy Yard, Philadel- 
phia, furnished oleo instead and in 
violation of the law. Dr. Warren 
has already instituted proceedings 
against these parties and has enlisted 
the co-operation of the Federal Gov- 
ernment as well. He also called at- 
tention to the fatal defect in a section 
of the oleo-margerine law and sug- 
gested that it would be well for all 
parties interested to co-operate and 
to have the oleo law made enforce- 
able. At the conclusion of these re- 
marks, Bro. Frank P. Willets intro- 
duced the following resolution which 
w^as unanimously adopted and which 
will doubtless result in an active cam- 
paign solidifying the butter interests 
of this State against the schemes of 
their common wily foe : 

"I move that a committee be ap- 
pointed by the Master of Pomona 
Grange, No. 3, W. H. H. Davis, to 
confer with the Master of the State 
Grange, the Pure Butter Protective 
Association, the State Dairy Asso- 
ciation and kindred agricultural or- 
ganizations, also, the State Dairy and 
Food Commissioner and the Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, with the view of 
formulating a plan to secure the solid 
support of the Congressmen and Sen- 
ators of the State of Pennsylvania." 



Woman's Work in the Subordinate 
Grange. 

It is most gratifying to note the in- 
creasing interest in woman's work in 
the subordinate Grange. Our mails 
bring letters daily asking for inform 
mation and our State officers, on the 
occasion of visits to Granges, are be- 
sieged with questions concerning this 
work. Really, there is no limit to the 
work which may be done, but one of 
the most natural lines which presents 
itself is the care of the children. 

In many Granges there are mem- 
bers who would gladly attend the 
meetings were it not for the children 
who must either be left alone or be 



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brought to the hall, where in poorly 
lighted and heated ante-rooms they 
stand about during the business meet- 
ing, growing sleepy and cross and en- 
dangering health. The juvenile work 
Is eminently fitted to some woman or 
women, enthusiastic for the good of 
the order. With a small number and 
limited accommodations this work 
can be made very successful and pro- 
fitable and the children thus trained 
will make the best Patrons of Hus- 
bandry for the future. The work will 
be fully explained to any who apply. 
It is a most deplorable fact that the 
brothers in many of our larger 
Granges are extremely selfish and per- 
sist in monopolizing the whole even- 
ing with business matters. They have 
no right to defraud others of the bene- 
fit of the literary hour and I think 
these same brothers if treated to meat 
alone would soon call loudly for more 
variety — for bread and vegetables and 
— being Americans — for pie. The 
mind's appetite calls also for a mixed 
diet and each member is refreshed by 
features entertaining as well as busi- 
ness. 

A bright woman who was appointed 
lecturer last fall, wrote recently for 
advice. She had formed many 
original plans for the work and had 
taken the office with enthusiasm but 
since installation had been given only 
three opportunities to have a program 
at all. Think of it ! And a majority 
of the brethren were in sympathy with 
her, but a few old wranglers were al- 
lowed to fill in the time with argu- 
ments on matters which could have 
been settled in short order had they 
been followers of the Golden Rule. 

Lecturers should avoid falling into 
"ruts." Nothing is so monotonous as 
a continual jagging along in the same 
line, because surprises are as restful 
and agreeable as flowers by the way- 
side. One of the most resourceful 
lecturers I have been so fortunate as 
to meet abounds in surprises both in 
regular as well as open meetings. 
Last fall, at an open meeting, after 
the regular prepared program had 
been completed she arose and made a 
few apologetic remarks, hoping that 
she had not over-stepped her author- 



ity and said that because of the 
difficulty in securing speakers she had 
taken the liberty to engage the cele- 
brated Peak Sisters whom she would 
then introduce.- Of course it was 
home talent, but the complete sur- 
prise of it is mentioned yet more 
prominently than the merits of the 
farce which is indeed most amusing 
and which was exceedingly well acted. 

It is a privilege to be a member 
of so great an Order as the Patrons 
of Husbandry and the least that we 
can do is to give it the best that is in 
us. This we can do at no loss, for its 
returns are far more than the best we 
can give. Who does not know of men 
to-day, prominent in the affairs of the 
State, whose voices are heard from the 
public platform and whose judgment 
is sought in matters of importance 
and who would have lived humdrum 
lives and died unknown had it not 
been for the ennobling, uplifting help 
of this Order! 

No beter work, then can be assigned 
to the women of the Grange than the 
looking after and training of the 
Grange children. Through them the 
parents can be reached and influence 
broadened. It is the beautiful old il- 
lustration of the tiny pebble cast into 
the stream by the hand of a child 
causing the ever widening circles 
which cease not until they break on 
the far distant shore. — Elizabeth 
Phelps Parnham, Chairman Woman's 
Work Committee, N. Y. State Grange, 
in National Stockman and Farmer. 



On going to his chicken coop one 

morning lately a member of Wells- 

boro Grange found eighteen chickens 

• without any internal machinery. 

Something had entered the yard and 

catching the chickens one after the 

other had taken out and eaten all of 

the inwards except the gizzard, but 

had not touched the meat or feathers. 

Saturday morning a hen was found 

which had been served in the same 

way. Sunday morning he found a 

large coon in a trap set to catch the 

thief. The animal was promptly 

killed and forwarded to the State Zo- 
ologist, Prof. H. A. Surface, at Har- 

risburg, for dissection. 

— Republican Advocate, Wellsboro* 




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Schuylkill County. 

The Pomona Grange of Schuylkill 
County was organized only this 
year, but is starting off with a picnic 
near Pine Grove, September 4th. 
That is business. Let the public real- 
ize your existence by being in evi- 
dence. « 

Hegins Grange, No. 1242 has set 
Sept. 23d for its picnic and has had 
its musical talent engaged for some 
weeivs. This Subordinate Grange last 
year distinguisbed itself with a rec- 
ord breaking picnic. The members 
all pull for success and Grange News 
predicts, therefore, that they will 
have it again this year. 



Bro. G. B. Wachob, of Salem 
Grange, No. 964, Clearfield County, 
feels proud of the fact that on tbe 
28th ult., a class of thirty-four was 
crowned with the reward of its la- 
bors and shared in a good supper 
with one hundred and sixty-five other 
Patrons. Fifty-two candidates were 
received during the last quarter and 
the roll-book now foots up one hun- 
dred and ninety-seven members. Our 
Clearfield County friends are hustlers 
and know a good thing when they 
see it. 



Braclford County Granules. 

Deputy A. T. Lilley, Bradford 
County, well known throughout the 
State in Grange circles, reports that 
the ten Granges which are under his 
jurisdiction are enjoying great pros- 
perity. That seven of this number 
own their own halls and that the av- 
erage merhbership is over 150. West 
Granville Grange, No. 257, has pre- 
pared a neat stage for the court, 
painted the interior of its Hall, put 
down new carpet, and is now after 
other decorations, all of which indi- 
cate activity on the part of its mem- 
bers, lona Grange No. 272 has come 
to the conclusion that it needs a bet- 
ter meeting place than it has been 
occupying, so it has procured a lot 
and has the foundation prepared for 
a new Hall. The owning of its own 
new home should make lona feel 
prosperous, contented, and aggres- 
sive to do still further and better 



Grange work. Beech Flats Grange 
No. 336 has a degree team which has 
the ritualistic work nearly all com- 
mitted. The ceremony in all of the 
degrees is beautiful and impressive 
when done by a degree team whose' 
special duty it is to qualify itself well 
for the work. Penn'a. Grange News 
is glad to note tnat the good ex- 
ample set by Bro. Lilley and others 
of the degree team of Openhand 
Grange of Bradford County is spread- 
ing not only in that county, but else- 
where over the State. 

Altho the original Openhand De- 
gree Team was organized prior to the 
State meeting *at Clearfield — where 
they put on the four degrees — there 
has not been a break or change in its 
personnel. 



What is the Grange as a Social Part 
of the Farmers' Life. 

This paper was read by Mrs. Kath- 
arine Beck-Crissman, Secretary of 
Factoryville Grange, No. 1245, at. 
Wyoming County Pomona Grange, 
held at Nicholson ; 

The educational features of the 
Grange are the foundation stones up- 
on which the order is built, and by 
taking advantage of them the farmer 
may be the peer of the man in other 
business. The opportunities of the 
farmer in former years were limited 
in the extreme. We hold that it is 
necessary in doing a mutual co-opera- 
tive work, to have knowledge, ac- 
quaintance, and understanding with 
those with whom work is to be done, 
as well as a definite idea of results 
desired and the field to labor in. 
We also hold that when a body of 
people get in touch with one another 
in a concerted effort, or in other 
words, when they become acquainted 
'thus placing greater confidence in 
each other and learn to act together 
in an organized capacity, it is much 
easier to induce them to reach out 
and take hold of other movements 
requiring, unity of action. From the 
kindly feeling and the fraternal fel- 
lowship and acquaintance that is be- 
iner developed in the thousands of 
Pomona and Subordinate Grange 
meetings held here and there all over 
the State a mighty force is. growing 
and concreting among the agricul- 
tural people that is surely destined to 
bring added blessings to future gen- 
erations. This mighty force is also 
centering to educate, develop and lead 
its members up and on to added 
blessing-s, not only to agriculturists. 



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but to all mankind. Every patron 
should feel that a duty ' devolves on 
him to take active part in advancing 
the work of the Grange, for in the 
Grange we learn to love each other, 
respect each other, and honor each 
other. We are brought in contact 
with people that opportunities had 
not afforded us. We form our kindly 
feelings from the bottom of each 
heart. Let us, O Patrons ! give three 
cheers for the grand organization, 
the Grange, which has come to stay. 
It is the only organization where 
fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, 
sweethearts and loved ones can assem- 
ble together in a united capacity, 
forming a fellowship that shall never 
be lost to mankind. Do not consider 
that paying dues is all that is neces- 
sary to get the results that should be 
attained through organization of 
those engaged in the great calling of 
agriculture. Patrons do not look for 
perfection in man or his work; but 
by constantly striving individually 
and collectively to meet responsibil- 
ities manfully, you will become strong- 
er, thus aidng those with whom you 
associate in building up the Order and 
community preparatory to leaving the 
world better than you found it. 
In the country home should be found 
good breeding, intelligence and high 
morals. These are attained only as 
a result of the contact of mind with 
mind. "As iron sharpeneth iron, so 
does a man the countenance of his 
friend." If the future of the country 
holds happiness and prosperity for 
the masses, the farmer must occupy 
a leading place. Again the appeaf 
comes to us; let us every one be loyal 
to ourselves, our officers and our 
Grange. Stand by each other. 



Graiifto Kncainpiiient aiul Exliibitioii 
C entre Hall, Pa. 

Don't miss the Great Kncampment 
and Fair of the Patrons of Husbandry 
at (Grange Park, Centre Hall, Pa., 
September 16th to ?2d, 1905. 

Encampment op'^'us Saturday, the 
16th of September. The Fair opens 
Monday. Septembcj' ISth. 

The Trunk Eine Railroad Associa- 
tion offers excursion rates over all 
lines in Pennsylvai-^'a at a fare and 
one-third for the -^ound trip from 
points in Pennsylva^^ia, including Pal- 
timore, Md., and Elmira, N. Y., (with- 
out card ordei's); tickets to be sold 
and good going September 14th, to 
22d, and returning to September 25th, 
Inclusive. 

For tents, exhibition privileges. 



sale stands, and amusement privileges 
apply to the chairn^an. 

LEONARD RHONE, 

Centre Hall, Pa- 



Limestone Grange, No. 1090, War- 
I'en County will hold its annual fair 
September 28 and 29. In addition to 
the display of various products a good 
literary and musical treat will be pre- 
sented. 

Bro. N. S. Wheelock, the W. M., 
sends us the following : 

"Our Grange is doing very nicely 
this year. We have a number of ac- 
tive members also +here are a good 
many young people who are very 
much interested in our work. Two 
weeks ago we had an attendance of 
twenty-six; however, we usually have 
thirty. A literary contest has been 
started and we are all quite anxious 
for good and interesting results. Two 
of our worthy sisters have chosen 

sides, taking all the memVjers (as in 
the old fashioned spelling schools), 

one side has a ijrogramme consisting 
of reading, recitation, newspaper, mu- 
sic (vocal and instrumental), proph- 
ecy, etc., taking in about six of the 
members. As each one delivers their 
number one on the opposite side re- 
sponds, for instance a song on one 
side a song on the other; a reading 
on one side, a reading on the other. 
We have three judges appointed who 
keep tally of those doing the best 
each evening. We shall try to keep it 
up at least two months and the last 
night determine which side has the 
most marks. The side having the 
least is to give a gi'and supper. It is 
seeming to give life to our members, 
and we thought perhaps some of the 
other sisters would like to hear and 
try the experiment." 



leather Seedy. 

A farmer had a seeder for the sow- 
ing of his seed, 

'Twas a seeder made of cedar, and 
said I, "Pray is there need. 

Of the seeder made of cedar..?" said 
the farmer, "Yes, indeed," 

I have never seed a seeder sir, that 
I'd concede the speed 

To exceed a cedar seeder for the seed- 

of the seed." — From Life. 




^■^^ 



II 



I) 



Each Subordinate Grange can per- 
form an important service for its 
community this season by devoting 
one or more days to the holding of 
a purely local "fair." Select a date 
on which the greatest number of the 
products of the community can be 
shown in their peffection. Confine 
the display of products strictly to the 
limits covered by the Subordinate 
Grange. On the date selected, let 
each member take to the Grange 
meeting samples of all the products 
of his farm. Imagine what a showing 
can be made. Consider the education- 
al stimulus of a showing thus made. 
Picture the surpris'^^ in store for the 
exhibitors. Compa- ^son would aston- 
ish many farmers. A simple Grange 
fair on these lines need not cost a 
dollar. The exhibitors would carry 
their displays to and from the meeting 
and the products would not be injured 
by the carriage and exhibition. Such 
displays might be made often enough 
to show all the year's products in 
the community. A State fair reaches 
the few. A county fair reaches the 
leaders among the farmers of the 
county. A Grange fair would reach 
every farmer in the community. A 
series of such Grange fairs throughout 
the States would reach the majority 
of the farmers and stimulate them in 
all ways by the comparison of pro- 
ducts. Some Granges have tried pure- 
ly local displays with good results, 
and the State and Pomona Granges 
can do the order and the farmers 
a most valuable service in developing 
this idea. N. Y. FARMER.". . 



Nature & Company. 

Greatest Spring Opening on Record T 
We are a little late, but we're here 
to stay. None can afford to miss the 
attractions offered. Just cast your 
eyes over the list : — 

Green Lawns 
Velvety. Every one washable and 
a full yard wide. Free cuttings by 
our competent corps of cows. Figur- 
ed Borders in handsome patterns. 
Dresses for Outdoors in the newest 
Shades 
Rose Lavender 

Violet • Lilac 

Rare Perfumes 



Any kind you like. Produced ab- 
solutely from real flowers without 
the aid of chemicals. 

Sun and Rain Umbrellas 
In natural wood- Our own manu- 
facture. 

Mattings 

of straw and grass. Cool and restful 
after a winter on carpets. 

Music 
The latest hits of American Song- 

(sters : — 

Prelude R. Redbreast 

Matin Hymn. . Blue Bird 

Evening Song S. Swallow 

Nocturn W. P. Will 

O, Be Mine T. O. Whee 

My Love is up a Tree B. Thrush 

(Arranged for solo, duet, or chorus) 
Bargains in Beds 

Pansy Beds 

Heliotrope Beds 
Fern Beds 

Radish Beds 

Tulip Beds 

Lettuce Beds 

Also Fine Summer Comforts 

Rustic Furniture 

Ivy Cots 
Grape Vine Swings 
Rustic Seats 
Hammocks 
Balsam Cushions 

OLiOunges 

Stump Sawed Tables of chestnut, 

oak, maple, and hickory, with as 
many extra leaves as you ask for. 

Blue Veils 
Light as mist, cobwebbed and 
watered 
Art Bargains 
Exquisite landscapes in sixty colors. 
Mostly unframed- Some vignetted. 
Pictures no artist can paint. 
Remember ! 
The goods displayed at our Spring 
opening are up-to-date and seasonable 
and nothing is imported. Nothing Is 
shopworn. Nothing Is imitation. We 
handle the genuine article and no- 
thing else. 

No mail or 'phone orders filled. Tou 
must come to us. 

Everything in our stock is free tor 
the asking. 

Bear in Mind 
TAKE ANY TROLLEY LINE 
NATURE & CO. 



12 



In these hot days on the farms the 
"men folks" should not forget that 
the "women folks" have claims to 
consideration. "Work in the sunlight 
with the thermometer at 75 to 85 de- 
.grees Fahrenheit may be trying 
work for the men, but they should re- 
member that in the kitchen, with the 
stoves roaring, the women, who bake, 
boll, fry, broil, stew, preserve, can, 
dry, wash, iron, scrub, wash dishes, 
starch, sweep, clean cans, scour, cook, 
carve, roast, toast, poach, peel, dish 
and serve, must work in temperatures 
that range from 85 to 100 and more 
degrees. Haying is hard and hot 



work, but it lasts only a few day«. 
Housekeeping is harder and hotter 
work, and it lasts all the season and 
all the year. — New York Farmer. 



"The thing that goes the farthest 
Toward making life worth while, 

That costs the least and does the most 
Is just the pleasant smile." 



"Not Mates." 



"It's funny," said the little pig, 
"They didn't build me right, 

And make my stomach just as big 
As is my appetite." 



STATEMENT 

— of the — 

Patron's Mutual Fire Association of N. W. Pa. 

As the Books Show, June 1, 1905. 



This issue we publish the statement of another of the Grange Fire Insur- 
ance Companies. This one embraces Erie, Crawford, Warren, Mercer and 
Venango Counties. June 1st it was carrying over $5,274,600 of insurance and 
has saved the Patrons insured in it in that part of the State thousands of 
dollars. 



Insurance in force March 1, 1905 

Written this quarter $415,045 

Expired and cancelled 170,937 



$5,030,492 



Net Gain ^ 

Net in force on date 

Pre.oiium notes in force 

Cash Account of Secretary. 

Received from fees , 

Received from assessments 



Total received. . . 
Cash on hand March 1 



Total to account for ; . . . . 

Paid out as follows 

On losses 

For postage 

For adjusting , , 

For interest 

For supplies and printing 

For office Supplies, viz 
Fore telephone service . 

Refunded members 

Paid solicitors for collecting 

Paid loans 

Retained for general secretary work 
Retained for assessment work 



gas. 





244,108 




5,274,600 




327,152 


$1038.78 




6730.50 




7769.28 




1174.45 




8943.73 




$2010.85 




29.94 




13.66 




216.13 




59.75 




18.36 




1.35 




27.85 




205.85 


. 


6200.00., 




145,00 


V ' . " 


100.00 


■ ■, • . ■ 



Total paid out 

Less amount received and on hand March 1. . . .'. 

Due Secretary V .'. 

Losses Adjusted this quarter, Same as Paid. . 

Total Liabilities of Association . ./V r 

Total resources ; . .. .... , . 

Net liabilities of the Association. .. .'.■ 



■"Vi 



$9028.74 
8943.73 
84.99 
2010.88 
3435.09 
125'5;I2 
2182.12 



Q. I>, IlEATEt, Secretary. 






(f 



^-< 



THE PENNSYLVAWiA STATE COLLEGE 




^ranp Jtetti^ 





cnttmhtVf 1905 



of iKe Pennsylvania State Gran^^e 



Master, W. F. HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 

Overseer.lHON. A. C. BARRETT, NewMilford, Susquehanna Co. 

Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Co. 

Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, Goshenville, Chester Co. 
-Chaplain, REV J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 
'.Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 

Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 

Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 

Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 

Flora, MRS. J. S. Dale, State College, Centre Co. 

Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHER, Lincoln University, Chester Co. 

L. A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, Millvillage, Erie Co. 



Executive Committee 

U. FRANK CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 

G. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



Finarikce Committee 

D.|B. Mc WILLIAMS, Burnham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

JOHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Hnntingdon Co. 



Lfe^islative Committee 

W. l\ HILL. Chamberaburg. Franklin Co. 

HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co. 
E. B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



Pennsylvania Granges are going to add 10,000 members this year 

THIS MEANS WORK. 



-/ 



/ 



<2Sf 




vnnm 



Tubltsherl bg tb^ T^nnsgluanm ^tutt C&raugc 




VOL. II. No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, J905 



20 Cents per Year.. 
5 Cents per Copv 



W. F. HIL1L<, 

Editor. 
G. W. OSTER, W. T. CREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department, Editor I,egislative Committee Departmen 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered A\igust 9, 1904. at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16 ,1904 



EXPERIENCES IN ITALY. 



WHEN taking- a carriage ride out from some of the cities in Europe,, 
it seemed ratlier odd to be halted at the city limits and have your 
vehicle examined to determine whether one was trying to smuggle 
some dutiable goods into the city. Clities in Italy maintain a force 
of men whose business it is to collect tariff duties on goods carried 
by people past the city limits. They would thrust a probe dowm into a load 
of cabbage or vegetables that the huckster was taking to market to satisfy 
themselves that some dutiable article was not concealed within. 

While one expects to find custom officers along the frontiers between 
different governments, it hardly seems to be good politics for each city and 
province in the same country to maintain custom officers and to collect duties 
on articles moved from one city or province to another in the same country. 
Of course, there was nothing to do but to comply with their regulations and 
make no fuss about it. 

The city of Milan is in Northern Italy and near it is a water power which, 
I am told, generates a larger number of horse power in electricity than any 
similar institution in the world. While our own Niagara l^alls has capacity 
to excel this plant and may do so, yet at the present time we have nothing to 
equal this one at Milan. One of the interesting sights here is the great 
cathedral two hundred and fifty feet wide and four hundred and fifty feet 
long, but its magnificence and beautj^ of architecture are beyond my power 
to describe. Built of white marble, the roof is supported by pillars, while 
the stained glass windows portray subjects in Bible history that will afford 
one profitable study for hours at a time. Several thousand statues of saints, 
most of them on the outside of the building, adorn the structure. 

In the old church of Saint Maria Delia Graca, with its convent, is the 
celebrated fresco of the Last Supper. Although Napoleon stabled his horses 
in this convent and the picture is somewhat mutilated, yet its reproductions 
are to be seen everywhere and give one an idea of the glory of the original. 

A most interesting city to me is that one built on the one hundred and 
fourteen little islands in the Adriatic Sea at the west of Italy — Venice. A 
band of robbers and pirates founded tMs city which now^ numbers about one 
hundred and seventy-five thousand in population. During the time of the, 
crusades it furnished ships for transportation to the Holy Land and from 
that time to this, it has occupied an important place in the commerce of that 
part of the world. Shakespeare, in the romance of Shylock insisting tliat he 



be paid in the pound of flesh, has linked the distant past of Venice to the- 
present and shows us that even in the good old times the monopolist was in- 
sisting upon his special privilege as "he is to-day. 

I did not see a living horse in this city. The four large bronze horses on 
top of St. Mark's Church convey to the minds of the children what a real 
horse may look like . The streets are all of water and traveling is done in 
gondolas. 

I reached this city at about four o'clock in the morning and instead of 
taking a 'bus to the hotel, as I had been doing, I stepped into a gondola and 
saying to the gondolier. "Albergo Bauer Gruwald," he started to take me up 
to that hotel. Exeei)t the Grand Canal, the most of the other sti-eets or canals 
are narrow, not over eight or twelve feet wide. It was an early hour, and 
people wt re not astir generally. The first vehicle we met was another gondola 
upon which was piled beds, chairs, bedding and all those things which go to> 
make up a family moving. It reciuired some engineering skill to pass this 
hay rack load in a narrow street, but the oarsmen are experts. My gondolier 
stood on top on the rear part of his boat and with a single oar resting in a 
high oar-lock at the right of the boat, and with a pushing motion, instead of a 
pulling one, he drove the boat surely, swiftly and almost noiselessly. During 
the heat of the day, they put a canopy up on the gondola to shade the tourist, 
and for twenty cents an hour the traveler may enjoy the pleasures of touring 
Venice while somebody else does the rowing. Each gondola is required by 
law to be painted black. They will not allow the traveler to row. 

The Grand Canal is wide and, as it leads to the open sea, is filled at all 
times with craft of vai'ious kinds and sizes. Two Italian gunboats lay at 
anchor while I was hei'e. At intervals narrow bridges span the canals and 
there is some opportunity for walking. Three sides of the square in front of 
St. Mark's Church is lined with shops in which are displayed for sale fancy 
articles in lace and glassware, both of which are manufactured on a large 
scale and show beautiful designs and workmanship. One lace factory em- 
ploys about four hundred women and its skilled workers receive as high as 
twenty cents a day in our money. 

In the Doge's Palace is the largest picture in the World, "The Glory of 
Paradis(>," about eighty by thirty feet. Many other fine old oil paintings are 
here, all of whicli are by noted artists- 

St. Mark's Church is the most Important church in this city and when 
one sees the pigeons which hover about the monumerit in front of this church, 
he is reminded of that picture so often seen, "Feeding the Pigeons of St. 
Mark's." The body of St. Mark, the great evangelist, was lifted and de- 
posited here. His bones now^ repose beneath the altar of the church bearing 
his name. The wonderful architecture of the Orient certainly renders this 
church conspicuous among the great churches of the world and provides a 
sepulcher worthy of the fame of this immortal Bible character. Quaint carv- 
ings from Egypt and from the twisted columns from Solomon's Temple at 
Jerusalem decorate this temple, while th6 interior furnishes an almost endless 
study in its portrayal of Bible history. 

Another interesting building of this peerless city is the Palace of Queen 
Margherita. She will be remembered as the wife of King Humbert, of Italy, 
and the mother of Victor Emanuel, Italy's present King. When the latter 
took to himself the Montenegro Princess as a bride, the new wife became the 
Queen and the old Queen was set aside. There is in this an element of sad- 
ness; but while the old Queen no longer wears the crown, she is enthroned 
in the hearts of the Italian people, who will never cease to be grateful for 
her virtues and many kindly acts. It was my fortune to be in Venice at a 
time when she visited the city and I enjoyed the musical serenade which was 
arranged to be given on the Grand Canal in front of the Palace in her honor. 
A large ship was brilliantly lighted and decorated all over. A large corps of 
Italy's famous musicians w^as aboard and the ship floated down the Canal, 
surrounded by hundreds of gondolas, each carrying its load of human freight,. 



presenting a very pretty spectacle. I think I never heard music that sounded 
so sweet to me as this, and the climax was reached when Queen Margherita 
stepped forward on the balcony and bowing, smiled a kindly greeting to the 
multitude that had congregated in front of the Palace. I was glad of the 
opportunity to join my voice with the voices of the citizens of a foreign land 
as, in the Italian language, they shouted their love for a retired Queen and 
pledged fealty and devotion to the new now in authority. Such is the stuff of 
which patriotism is made and loyalty to one's country appeals to a man every 
time. W. F. HILL. 

Executive Committee ^e^Hiim^it 

G. W. OSTER, Editor. 



A_T the call of Worthy Master 
Hill the Executive Com- 
mittee met at West Ches- 
ter on Aug. 24th and 25th. 
We had the pleasure of 
attending one of Chester County's 
mammoth Pomona meetings we have 
been hearing so much about. There 
were members present from four 
States and the attendance was prob- 
ably 500 or more. In the evening a 
special 6th degree session of the State 
Grange was held and the beautiful 
and sublime degree of Flora was con- 
ferred on a class of 230 applicants. 
The sessions of the Executive Com- 
mittee were held on the 25th. A 
number of matters of considerable 
importaWe were considered and dis- 
posed of. . The arrangement for the 
coming meeting of he State Grange 
at Sunbury was completed as far as 
possible. 

A contract was entered into with 
Theodore Z. Root, the author of a 
new book entitled "The Dark Side of 
the Beef Trust." It contains 160 
pages and has 19 chapters telling all 
about the vile methods practiced by 
the beef trust and the big packing 
houses. It tells all about the crip- 
pled and diseased cattle that are 
slaughtered and made into canned 
beef, bologna sausage, etc. It is a 
blow at the beef trust and every per- 
son should read the book as it con- 
tains a vast amount of valuable in- 
formation. 

The books are placed on consign- 
ment in the hands of the Worthy 
Master, Lecturer, Secretary and each 
member of the Executive Committee. 
Either of these parties can supply 



the book at 55 cents each in cloth, 
or 35 cents each in paper. Order one 
at once and have your eyes opened 
on the packing house business. 

Mr. Lubin, of the firm of Lubin & 
Co., of New York, appeared before 
the Co'mmittee and together we fully 
discussed and considered the co-op- 
erative method of doing business with 
their house. We finally agreed upon 
a plan whereby the State Grange 
shall share the profits of the busi- 
ness done with Pennsylvania patrons. 
A special order blank has been pre- 
pared for the use of patrons differing 
somewhat from the other Qrder 
blanks used by this house. The 
Worthy Master was directed to ask 
the secretaries of each Subordinate 
Grange in the State to furnish us 
with a list of the Grange families 
represented in each Subordinate 
Grange. It is gratifying to know thgit 
an a rule the secretaries are respond- 
ing very promptly. At this writing 
Bro. Hill has already received some 
10,000 names and will probably get 
from 12,000 to 15,000 when all in. 

To each of these names our Grange 
Mail Order House of Lubin & Co. will 
mail a copy of their 98-page Season 
Bulletin for the fall and winter of 
1905-06. Each of these families will 
also receive a special prepared order 
book fitted up with carbon paper for 
making a duplicate of your order. 
In addition to this the Secretary of 
each Grange will receive a sample 
book containing samples of most of 
the outer garments advertised for 
men's and women's wear in the said 
bulletin. This sample book cost the 
house almiost one dollar each and it 



is gotten out for the use of the Sub- 
ordinate Granges. It will be mailed 
to every Secretary in the State, who 
of course, is expected to take it to 
the Grange hall and let it there for 
the use of the entire membership. In 
this way every member may have an 
opportunity of seeing just what the 
goods are like before ordering. 

I want to urge upon all the neces- 
sity of using none but the Special 
Grange Order blanks. It is only when 
we use this blank that the State 



Grange gets the benefit of any dis- 
count or share of the profits. 

This is ideal co-operation and the 
State Grange will participate in the 
profits just in proportion to the 
amount of business that our Mail Or- 
der House does with the Pennsylva- 
nia Grange members. Let us all pull 
together and see what the result will 
be. I am satisfied that patrons will 
get good values for their money sent 
to this house. Fraternally, 

GEO. W. OSTER. 



I 



Allied Dairy Interests Hold Important Conference in West Chester, Pa. 






State Grange Offleers Make Several 

Meetings Possible— iVid from 

Congress. 

An impoi'tant conference of repre- 
sentatives from various farmers' or- 
ganizations Avas held at West Ches- 
ter August 24tli to take action in re- 
gard to the desired elimination of the 
word "knowingly" from the federal 
law against selling oleomargarine- 

Beside the prominent Pennsylva- 
nians, Sec'y Giles of the N. Y. State 
Grange, and W. W. Ware of X. Y. 
State Grange, Ex. Com., were present. 
Mr. Hill was made Chairman of 
the conference and Mr. Durnall Sec- 
retary. 

Mr. Sharpless spoke in favor of 
making all possible efforts to secure 
the desired change in the federal law, 
and recommended that the farmers 
generally write personal letters and 
send memorials to the members of 
Congress and the United Spates Sen- 
ators asking to have this done. 

On motion of Mr. Critchfleld, a 
sub-committee consisting of Mr. Hill, 
Mr. Willetts and Dr. Warren was ap- 
pointed to draft a memorial to be 
submitted to the law makers. 

Later in the afternoon this sub- 
committee visited "Pomona Grange 
and presented the gist of the memor- 
ial, which was unanimously adopted. 
This measure is yet to be formulated 
in its completeness, but it will be to 
the general effect that as there are 
powerful influences at work seeking 
the repeal of the federal law pre- 



venting the manufacture and sale of 
oleomargarine as butter, members of 
the Granges, Farmers' Clubs and 
kindred organizations are urged to 
write personal letters to their Con- 
gressmen and U. S. Senators, request- 
ing their influence, and to request all 
farmers' journals and other papers 
circulating in farming districts, not 
only in Pennsylvania but throughout 
the territory covered by the National 
Grange to take up this matter. 

It was further recommended that 
every district should make an effort 
to elect to the Legislature at least 
one ni'-inb<:^r who .sliould be thera for 
the purpose of guarding the farm.ers' 
interests. 

Edward Walter recommended that 
there be more Legislators of the 
Farmer Creasy type, saying that from 
Farmer Creasy the agriculturists 
could always get a straight tip on 
what was going on. 

— "Local News," West Chester. 



Pennsylvania State College has a 
larger number of students entering 
this year than ever before in its his- 
tory. The faculty has been changed 
and strengthened. As the Governor 
vetoed a large portion of the appro- 
priation that the Legislature voted 
to help agriculture at the College this 
important interest remains crippled 
there as usual. Now that the College 
authorities stood ready to help agri- 
culture more it' is very unfortunate 
that the State failed to co-operate. 



/- 



^egmhtive ^ouimittee ^e^nrimmt 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 






In reply to many inquiries we will 
publish in the October No. of the 
Grange News the record of the mem- 
bers of the last Legislature on the 
measure of allowing trolleys to carry 
freight and also an explanation of 
tTie new township road law. This 
issue two new importar]i-4aws appear. 

Every member of the Grange 
should be a reader of the Grange 
News, it contains valuable informa- 
tion which is reliable. 

Pennslyvania is rapidly forging to 
the front as one of the leading 
Grange States. The spirit of united 
action is nowhere better. Our State 
ofRcers are planning a more compact 
organization in order to secure some 
of the many needed reforms advo- 
cated by our order. Join the pro- 
cession. W. T. CREASY. 



118. 
AN ACT. 
Regulating the method and procedure 
in the erection of line or partition 
"■fences. 

Whereas, From the different acts 
of Assembly in regard to fence laws 
in this Commonwealth, grave compli- 
cations and litigations arise between 
owners of real estate as to the line or 
partition fences : 

iSection 1. Be it enacted, «&c., That 
from and after the passage of this act, 
owners of improved and occupied land 
shall erect and maintain an equal 
part of all line or division fences be- 
tween them, nor shall any such owner 
be relieved from reliability under the 
provisions of this act except by the 
consent of the adjoining owner- And 
if any owner of such improved and 
occupied land shall fail or neglect to 
erect or maintain his, her or their 
share of such line or division fence, 
the party aggrieved shall notify the 
township or iDorough auditors, whose 
duty it shall be to examine such line 
or division fence, so complained of; 
and if they find said fence sufficient, 
the complainant shall pay the cost 
of their services, which shall be two 
dollars for each day's service; but if 
they find such fence insufficient, they 
shall so report to a jusitiee of the 
peace, residing in the county where 
such fence is located, designating 
points and distances of such fence, 
whether a new fence is required or 



whether the old one can be repaired^ 
and the probable costs of a new, or 
the repair of the old, fence; and said 
justice shall notify the delinquent 
owner of such improved and occupied 
land of the auditors' report, and that 
his part of ^aid fence, as found, by 
the auditors, be erected or repaired 
within forty days from .the date of 
such notice; and if such notice be not 
complied with, the aggrieved party 
may cause said line or division fence 
to be erected or repaired, and the 
costs thereof collected from the de- 
linquent owner of such improved and ' 
occupied land, as other debts are col- 
lected by law : Providing, however, 
that no owner of improved land shall 
be compelled to build or repair fence 
during the months of December, Jan- 
uary, February and March : And pro- 
vided further, That nothing herein 
contained shall be construed to apply 
to railroad companies. 

Section 2- Where an owner has im- 
proved up to and erected upon the- 
line a division fence, and an adjoin- 
ing owner subsequently improves and 
occupies up to said line, he shall be- 
come liable to the former for sucli 
part of the cost of said fence as is just 
and reasonable, taking into considera- 
tion the quantity of the fence, the 
length of time it had been erected, 
and its condition. And in case the 
parties fail to agree on the amount 
to be paid, the owner who erected 
said fence may complain to_ the au- 
ditors, aforesaid, who shall assess the I 
amount which, in their opinion, the 
other party should pay ; which amount 
with costs, may be recovered as pro- 
vided in section one of this act. 

Section 3. All acts Or parts of acts 
inconsistent with this act are hereby 
repealed. 

Section 3. All acts or parts of acts 
A. D. 1905. 

SAML. W. PENNYPACKER. 



No. 2 3. 
AN ACT. 
Permitting children, residing in school 
districts in which no public high 
school is maintained, to attend a 
high school in some other district, 
located near their homes, and pro- 
viding for the payment of cost of 
tuition and school books. 
Section 1. Be it enacted, &c., That 
children residing in school districts 
in which no public high scTiool is 
maintained, may attend a high school 
in some other district, located near 
their homes; provided the consent of 
the directors of the district in which 



8 



said high school is located be fir^ ob- 
tained; the cost of tuition and school 
books, which shall not exceed that of 
the cost of tuition and school books of 
children in the same grades or 
courses in the district maintaining 
such high school, shall be paid to the 
district receiving such children, out 
of the moneys raised by taxation for 
public school purposes in the district 
in which said children reside : Pro- 
vided, That, before admission to a 
high school, such pupils shall be ex- 
amined and found qualified for high 
school work, by the principal of such 
high school. 

Approved — The 16th day of March, 
A. D., 1905 . 

SAML. W. PENNYPACKER. 



Economy in Public Affairs. 

The Crawford County Pomona 
Grange gives considerable attention 
to political economy. At its session 
Sept. 7th and 8th, the following reso- 
lutions were adopted. 

"Eternal vigilance is the price of 
libberty," so must the taxpayers in- 
terests be continually guarded. 

Whereas, The taxpayers of Craw- 
ford County were informed over three 
years ago that the county was out of 
debt, we confidently expected that 
this meant lower taxes, but taxes are 
as high or higher than ever. And 

Whereas, This state of affairs leads 

us to believe that there must be a 
reckless- waste of the people's money. 
Therefore, 

Resolved, That we demand greater 
economy in the management of coun- 
ty affairs as follows: 

First. We most emphatically pro- 
test against the practice of allowing 

th&.. county treasurer a percentage 
which enables him to accumulate 
more money in three years than the 
average man can by industry and 
good management in a lifetime. 

Second. We are opposed to the 
practice now being fastened upon the 
taxpayers of this county in the way 
of building small bridges by the coun- 
ty commissioners believing that such 
work can be don^ by the townships 
at a great saving of money. 

Third. We are not satisfied with 
the practical workings of the law 
which creates the office of county de- 
tective, believing that altogether too 
much petty law business finds its way 
into the courts. We therefore recom- 
mend the discontinuance of this office. ^ 

Fourth. We are disgusted with the 
large and increasing num'^er of crim- 
inals who are sentenced to the county 
jail to be fed and lodged at the coun- 
ty's expense and earnestly urge the 
working upon the public roads of 



every person whose misdemeanor 
comes under the law regulating the 
same. 

Fifth. We are opposed to all 
schemes looking to a new jail or the 
removal of buildings of the county 
infirmary. The jail is plenty good 

enough for the class of human beings 
who inhabit it, if it does not suit them 
good behavior will keep them out. 
Our county farm is beautifully lo- 
cated, tlie buildings stand on gravelly 
soil, the natural drainage being the 
very best. The surroundings are such 
that it would take years to duplicate 
them. We therefore favor making 
needed repairs on the buildings, not 
with an eye to extravagance, but 
plain comforts for the inmates. 

Sixth. Our observation convinces 
us that there is altogether too much 
outdoor relief given to residents of 
Meadville and Titusville. Careful 
scrutiny on the part of the county 
commissioners we believe could save 
many dollars to the taxpayers, with 
no injustice to the worthy poor. 



Higher Honors for Many. 

Patrons of Pennsylvania are want- 
ing to be invested with the honors of 
the higher dregees of the Order. This 
is in keeping with the large growth 
the Order is making in the State and 
in harmony with the increased ac- 
tivities manifest in all departments 
of our work. Three Pomona Granges 
in different parts of the State request- 
ed that a special session be held in 
their respective jurisdictions in the 
Sixth Degree. After pledging them- 
selves to meet the conditions special 
sessions were held and classes were 
advanced to the higher degrees, as- 
follows: 

At West Chester, August 24th, Po- 
mona Grange No. 3 of Chester and 
Delaware Counties, impressively con- 
ferred the Fifth Degree upon a class 
of about 126. Immediately follow- 
ing this State Grange Ofl^icers ad- 
vanced 230 through the Sixth Degree. 
While there were many willing work- 
ers yet credit for the magnificent suc- 
cesses of the evening is in largest 
measure due to the intelligent plan 
ning, energy and devotion of two 
worthy sisters — the Misses Josephine 
Roberts and Frances Broomall. The 
former looked after all arrangements 
and for securing applicants for the 
Fifth. , The latter did the same for 
the/gixth and no detail was omitted. 



At the private Pomona meeting in 
the afternoon there were six or eight 
hundred patrons present, four States 
being represented. It was a memor- 
able occasion thruout. 

On the evening of Sept. 6th the 
"Wyoiming Pomona No. 19 held a 
s'pecial session for Degree work only 
in the opera house, Tunkhannock. 

The Worthy Master Bro. Henning 
had the officers meet in the afternoon 
for rehearsel and to decorate the 
stage. In the evening the work was 
rendered in an exemplary manner as 
a class of about twenty were inducted 
into the mysteries of this Degree. 
Eighty-six applicants later greeted 
the State officers and were introduced 
to the Court of Flora. 

Pomona Xo. 30 Tioga County took 
the precaution to have plenty of time 
and to combine the visit of the State 
officers with a regular meeting of the 
Pomona. Their meeting at Wells- 
boro Sept. 7 and 8 was very success- 
ful and satisfying. At its last two 
meetings this Pomona has" added 
fifty-nine to its Fifth Degree roll 
while on the evening of the 7th sixty- 
eight took the higher step and will 
be given certificates of membership 
in the Sixth Degree. 

At these special Sixth Degree ses- 
sions all the regular State Grange of- 
ficers are not present as the expense 
would be more than the receipts. 
"Vacancies are filled by appointment 
and in these meetings all participat- 
ing acquitted themselves creditably. 



State Lecturer's Corner. 

To the lecture department of the 
Grange largely belongs the literary 
educational work. And where we find 
a Grange having regular programs 
we are almost sure to find an active 
Grange, 

Therefore, on us lecturers of Sub- 
ordinate, Pomona and State Grange 
is resting a responsibility in carrying 
forward this work. Now that the 
busy season will soon be giving place 
to longer evenings, our activities in 
Grange work should be increased and 
all energies at our command enlisted 
to start the autumn and winter 



campaign of the forward movement 
of the Grange. 

(Since writing for the^e columns, 
Grange Rallies, or more commonly 
called Picnics, have been attended in 
several counties, namely : Erie, 
Warren, Crawford, Indiana, Potter, 
and Bradford. We would be pleased 
to give detailed account of each, 
would space allow; but must suffice 
to say that not one was a failure, 
while success and enthusiasm varying' 
in degree attended many. \ 

The estimated attendance ran 
from one hundred and twenty-five, 
caused by unfavorable weather con- 
ditions, to six thousand. Order and 
civility every^^ij|aere reigned among 
our people, causing one to admire 
more and more the high moral status 
and refining influences of the Grange, 
impressing more forcefully the value 
of the Order as a developer of per- 
fected citizenship. 

Now that the summer Grange Rally 
work is over and many without the 
gates have had opportunity to learn 
more of the Grange. It is our duty 
Fellow Patrons,' to go after the har- 
vest. Let us not be satisfied with 
merely having their names on the 
roll, but labor to have them become 
active members by providing study 
and work for them to do, for it is the 
mind as well as the hand_ of man 
that directs and moves the world and 
we are one and all acting in concert 
to the best of our ability to have this 
good old world of ours move on in 
the best possible way; that it, with 
you and I may become even better 
to-morrow than it was yesterday. 
Ever remember that to-day is the 
time to act. 

Questions to consider. 

Is a farm home more valuable if 
a Grange is near it ? 

Who contributes most to the wel- 
fare of society; the farmer or the me- 
chanic ? 

If tobacco is good for men, why do 
not more women use it ? 

WTiat is the way to avoid the ex- 
orbitant charges of the express 
companies ? 

Which is the better; fall or spring 
plowing for corn or potatoes ? 



lO 



Will You be There? 

It has become quite the thing for 
our city friends to leave home dur- 
ing the hot weather and to seek re- 
creation and new energy from an out- 
ing in the country. While summer 
is the season when they can take a 
few days off with least inconvenience, 
perhaps the month of December is 
the time when our members con most 
easily lay aside home cares and meet 
their fellows at some central point. 

This year that point is Sunbury 
and the week of the State Grange 
Meeting, Dec. 12-13-14-15, is the 
"week of weeks." 

Plan now to be there. Give the 
organization the benefit of your pres- 
ence and counsel. Get and give in- 
spiration as together we celebrate 
our year of greatest progress and at 
the same time discuss present prob- 
lems and outline plans for even 
greater conquests in 1906. All ses- 
sions (except one) will be held in the 
fourth degree. AU fourth degree 
members, in good sitanding, may at- 
tend but the privileges of voting are 
vested in those attending in the ca- 
pacity of delegates. Pomona No. 
31 — Montour and Northumberland 
Counties — will be the Pomona Host 
this year. On behalf of the State 
Grange Executive Committee, Broth- 
er Dildine, who lives in an adjoining 
county, will co-operate with tlie Po- 
mona and city officials in making lo- 
cal arrangements. With three such 
forces as these co-operating, and 
Grange enthusiasm running so high 
thruout the State, a "Bumper" meet- 
ing is predicted. Don't miss it. 



The Alphabet of Success. 

Attend carefully to details. 
Be prompt in all things. 
Consider well, then decide positive- 
ly- 
Dare to do right, fear to do wrong. 
Endure trials patiently. 
Fight life's battles bravely. 

Go not into the society of the vi- 
cious. 

Hold integrity sacred. 

Injure not another's reputation. 

Join hands only with the virtuous. 



Keep your mind free from evil 
thoughts. 

Lie not for any consideration. 
Make a few special acquaintances. 
Never try to appear what you are 
not. 

Observe good manners. 
Pay your dC'bts promptly. 
Question not the veracity of a 
friend. 

Respect the counsel of your par- 
ents. 

Sacrifice money rather than prin- 
ciple. 

Use your leisure for improvement. 
Venture not on the threshold of 
wrong. 

i'Watch carefully over your pas- 
sions. 

Extend to everyone a kindly greet- 
ing. 

Yield not to discouragement. 
Zealously labor for the right, and 
success is certain. 



Butteniialdng Fraud. 

Being accused of victimizing a 
large number of farmers and dairy- 
men in Pennsylvania and New Jersey 
by means of an alleged fraudulent 
formula prepared by Huestis & Co., 
of Jersey City, N. J., whereby it was 
asserted that a pound of pure butter 
could be made out of a pint of milk, 
but which proved upon investigation 
to be a scheme for adulterating but- 
ter, acting Postmaster General Hitch- 
cock issued a fraud order against that 
concern. 

This action was taken by the de- 
partment as a result of a complaint 
made by B. H. TVarren, Food and 
Dairy Commissioner of Pennsylvania, 
through Senator Penrose, that un- 
suspecting farmers and dairymen in 
the Keystone State had been deceived 
by the glowing accounts of the New 
Jersey concern as to what the prep- 
aration could do, and had purchased 
the formula and in consequence were 
induced unknowingly to violate the 
food laws of the various States. 

The wonderful process turns out to 
be, according to the inspector's re- 
port, simply a method for adulterat- 
ing butter already made. The form- 
ula given, the report states, is to take 
a pound of butter, a pint of cream 



II 



and a spoonful of a special prepara- 
tion, and as a result two pounds of 
butter will be obtained. 



Hill, had large and interested au- 
diences. 

As a means of advertising, this nov- 
el parade proved to be a winner. 



A Problem in Threes. 

What if three little houses stood in 
a row, 
With never a fence to divide, 
And if each little house had three 
little maids 
At play in the garden wide; 
And if each little maid had three lit- 
tle cats — 
(Three times three times tjjiree) 
And if each little- cat had three little 
kits, 
How many kits would there be? 

And if each little maid had three lit- 
tle friends, 
With whom she loved to play, 
And if each little friend had three 
J little dolls 
In dresses and ribbons gay; 

And if friends and dolls and cats and 
kits 
Were all invited to tea, 
And if none of them should send re- 
grets, 
How many guests would tliere be? 

— Exchange. 



Fantastic Parade. 

An unusual feature in connection 
with a Grange picnic was a fantastic 
parade at Shoemakersville Sept. 16. 
This Grange, No. 29, Berks Co., con- 
cluded to try something new to see 
if it could not strike the public fancy 
and attract a crowd from which it 
could get some new members. A 
brass band led the parade which was 
a quarter of a mile long and included 
some in humorous costumes and 
those whose faces had become black 
for the occasion. 

While there was an outpost of 
riders — young men and ladies on 
horseback — yet most people rode in 
vehicles decorated with grain and 
vegetable products of the good farms 
in that locality. 

This feature made a gaod hit and 
later the speakers. Senator Herbst, 
Congressman Green, and State Master 



The statement is often heard that 
a larger proportion of farmers' wives 
go to insane asylums than go from 
an equal number living elsewhere. 
Of course this is intended to be a re- 
flection upon the healthfulness of 
farm life. The assertion is untrue so 
far as Pennsylvania is concerned. In 
the great agricultural State of Illinois 
the State Grange Master there, Oliver 
Wilson, made an investigation and 
found that less than three per cent, 
of the State's insane came from the 
country. He also found that of the 
total prison pdpulation of the State 
only .49 of 1 per cent, came from 
farm homes. This shows that farm 
life preserves sanity and is conducive 
to respect for law. It shows where 
the criminals are bred who fill the 
prisons. 



Avoid Unjust Criticism. 

There is a growing tendency on the 
part of a few persons in the Grange to 
criticise harshly the actions and mo- 
tives of others in the Order, who are 
working as they believe the best for the 
upbuilding of the Order, says Overseer 
Fuller, in the Watertown Times. In an 
organization like the Grange there must 
of necessity be a diversity of opinions, 
and positive, progressive action should 
not be undertaken without careful de- 
liberation and forethought, but when 
such a course is determined upon, the 
worker should not be obliged to endure 
criticism from his brothers and sisters 
who are bound by every obligation to 
help rather than hinder. The secret of 
the defeat of the Russian army is not so 
much the fagj: that the Japs were su- 
perior fighters as it is that the Russian 
soldiers are not fighting with the support 
of the people at home. The general 
commanding the Russian army should 
be able to devote his whole energy to 
fighting the enemy, but on the contrary 
he is obliged to devote part of his time 
to answering the harsh criticism of 
those at home, regarding his campaign. 
The same thing holds true in the 
Grange. Offlcers and workers cannot 
do their best if they are hampered by 
harsh and unjust criticism of their work. 
In a battle the army wins which Is fight- 
ing the enemy first, last and all the time, 
and not fighting each other. 



12 



An Illustration of Fraternity. 

In these days of many cluljs, lodges 
^and orders, the word "fraternity" is of- 
ten heard. We know that according to 
"VVebster its meaning is a brotherhood, 
but we lightly repeat and hear it so of- 
ten that I fear we seldom give thought 
to its real significance. 

If we would have an ideal for the ex- 
pression of fraternity in our order, we 
must consider the Grange as a great 
family, and its members as indeed 
brothers and sisters, and must seek to 
practice the virtue found in ideal family 
life. This v'ould exclude much of the 
censure, the back-biting, the envy, and 
the unsympathetic spirit sometimes 
found among us, and would give place 
to more hearty appreciation, more 
thought for and kindly interest in each 
other. 

Two little lads were playing in the snow. 
The wintry sun shining out clear and 

bright, 
Had warmed the snow until it packed 

just right. 
Tliey both agreed to make a monstrous 

" ..all. 
And set to work with many a shout and 

call. 
O'er and o'er and 'round and 'round 

'twas rolled, until 
It reached the bottom of the schoolhouse 

hill, 
When, lo, they found the ball so large 

had grown 
They could not move it any more alone. 

Try as they would, the mammoth ball 

stood still. 
Although they tugged and pushed with 

hearty will. 
Weary at last, discouraged in their play, 
Tliey hailed a group of boys across the 

way. 
"Come, Tom and Joe," they cried, "and 

Ted and John," 
"Come help us roll this sonw ball far- 
ther on." 
With willing haste the boys came at the 

call. 
Their lusty shoulders placed against the 

ball. 
W'hen lo! with ease 'twas rolled from 

side to side, 
A mammoth heap that filled their 

hearts with pride. 

Our burdens like the snowtoall oft ap- 
pear; 

They rolling on, grow heavier year by 
year. 

Until at last our puny strength must 
fall, 

And We, dismayed, some passing broth- 
er hail 



To lend a hand ,to help us bear to-day 
The cares and heartaches that, beset our 

w; I y. 
How sliould we then stand ready every 

day 
To aid oui- toiling brother on his way; 
Ready to put our shoulder to the wheel, 
With hi'ar:s that know another's woe 

or weal. 
Ready to place our lamp well filled with 

oil 
When- it will light another at his toil. 
Mrs. ANNA W. STEARNS. 



A Juvenile Grange. 



Wlien the National Grange met in Cal- 
ifornia in 1889 the idea of a Juvenile 
Grange was formulated, and a commit- 
tee appointed to draft rules and a brief 
ritual for its use. Since then, several 
States have reported to the National 
Grange thriving juvenile organizations. 
The influence of the Juvenile Grange 
has no^ibly increased both the attend- 
ance and the membership of the parent 
Grange, besides assisting frequently in 
its literary exercises. 

AVhile games are played, amusement 
does not occupy too much time. Even 
these little ones know that the motto 
of the Grange i.q self culture and im- 
provement. They handle, subjects which 
require research, study and observation 
and they acquit themselves very credi- 
talily in debate and discussion. 

These children are learning to rise 
and express their thoughts without em- 
barassment. to consider with patient 
kindliness the rights of others to hold 
opposing views, to yield gracefully to 
majority rule, and to conduct a meet- 
ing according to parliamentary usages. 
Above all, these children are learning to 
know and love one another. They are 
widening their friendships and are cul- 
tivating unconsciously the true spirit 
of our nolile Order which will surely 
beautify and broaden their lives. 

— "Ocegon Bulletin." 



No Returning. 

Remember, three things come not back; 

The arrow sent upon its track, 

It will not swerve, it will not stay 

Its speed, it flies to wound or slay; 

The spoken word, so soon forgot 

By thee, but it lias perished not; 

In other hearts 'tis living still, 

And doing work for good or ill; 

And the lost opportunity 

That Cometh no more to thee. 

In vain thou weepest, in vain dost 

yearn, 
These three will nevermore return. 
.... — From the Arabic. 



B EGINNING witK tHe October i\u.ml>er, tKe price of 
"Gr ange News'* mtjII be 25 cent*. Until it appears, 
■subscriptions ivill be received at tKe present rate. yf 



■-J^'t'^'A/^ 



2-3 



<^*'*N*J 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY 
THE PEr^iMSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 





^ratig^ JteTO 





t\&%tx^ 1905 



*i^ 



"\ 



Quality vs. Adulteration 

THE VALUE OF PURE GROCERIES. 



The purchase of the supplies for the table and the ingredients that enter inta 
the things that you take into your stomach Is made largely on faith — faith In the 
name of the goods or in the name of the dealer who sells them to you. In nothing 
should you be fully as discriminating in (buying as in buying things to eat. Not only 
health Is dependent upon what you take into your body, but comfort, digestion and 
palate satisfaction is concerned. Substitution and adulteration are cries that are 
heard on every hand. Some dealers sell you inferior goods designedly. Many others 
sell them to you ignorantly. Perhaps the latter have never been in a position where 
they could make a study of the ingredients that enter into the goods they sell. Or 
perhaps they had no knowledge of the action of different ingredients upon the human 
body. Then again, perhaps, there is more profit made from selling that class of 
goods than goods that are up to the standard for purity and excellence. 

HIS EXPERIENCE IN A GROCREY 

A doctor was in a grocery store recently when a woman entered and asked for 
molasses, lard, butter and pepper. Her bill amounted to a dollar and eighty cents. 
Having but a dollar and fifty-seven cents in her purse, she had twenty-three cents 
of the amount charged. "When she left, the doctor, who had become Interested, 
followed her and, getting a sample of each of her purchases, analyzed them. He 
then computed the quantity of adulterations that he found in each at their fair 
valuation and placing an equally fair valuation upon the part of each that was pure 
he found that had the woman paid what it was worth, her bill would have been one 
dollar and nine cents. So that she should have had forty-eight cents left In her 
purse Instead of being twenty-three cents in debt. 

OF INTEREST TO FARMERS 

Farmers are interested in pure food products from another standpoint beside 
that of health or that of the consumer. They are interested because they sell their 
products in a state of purity. Later when adulterated the effect Is to increase the 
amount which lessens the demand and lowers the price. And so the farmer is 
robbed both coming and going. He receives less for the products he has to sell and 
sometimes finds no market at all, all because some substitution or adulteration has 
been practiced by the other fellow. As much of this class of goods is put up in 
sealed packages, it cannot be examined and the adulteration is so adroitly practiced 
as to avoid detection by ordinary methods, any way, so it behooves every one to buy 
where he has some assurance as to the quality of the goods and reliability of the 
dealer. 

WHERE DEALING IS SATISFACTORY 

In this connection, the old reliable house of Thornton Barnes appeals to the 
readers of Penn'a. Grange News to-day as it did to their fathers a quarter of a 
century ago. By square dealing this house has ingratiated itself into the favor of 
the buying public in thousands of Granges in more than a score of States In this 
Union. You know us either from direct dealings with our house on your own part, 
or through the satisfactory dealings that your neighbors have had with us. We 
are enjoying this confidence on your part which we have earned through the years of 
our business relations. We prize the acquaintances, made through the medium of 
the United States mails and to which your own handwriting was the introduction. 
But perhaps you are going to Atlantic City to the meeting of the National Orange In 
November, You will probaJbly go through Philadelphia. You will want to stop off 
and see some of the historical places. 

Among the long established institutions of Philadelphia Is the house of 
Thornton Barnes. This Is in the wholesale district of the city, No. 223 North Water 
Street, and we extend a cordial invitation to all to visit us here. 

THORNTON BARNES, 

223 North Water Street PHILADELPHIA 



.4 



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'ettws^wattxa 




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VyxbMsM bg the Vtrnxi^lnunm ^tuU (Snixig^ 



VOL. II. No. 3 



OCTOBER, J905 



25 Cents per Ybax. 
5 Cents per Copy 



G. W. OSTER, 

Editor Executive Committee Department, 



Editor. 

W. T. CREASY, 

Editor lyegislative Committee Departmiiirf 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered August 9, 1904, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16 ,1904. 



E33ITORIAL. 



EncouragLng. 

While the Grange membership and 
the Grange press have long advocated 
the parcels post for this cQuntry and 
so raise it to the level of most every, 
foreign country yet for quite a long 
time we got but little support. One 
by one we are gaining allies. Let us 
keep pounding away and the point 
will be won. The express companies 
will not be able to override the de- 
mands of the people forever. 

This is a good subject for every 
Grfinge to investigate and to pass res- 
olutions upon. Have the resolutions 
duly authenticated by the sigrnatures 
of the W. M. and W. secretary and 
seal. Then send them to your mem- 
ber of Congress and another copy to 
the United States senator. Congress 
will convene next December and we 
want to be in at the first table. The 
Scientific American helps along with 
the following: 

"The farmer has the rural free de- 
livery of mails — although this was 
thought to be impossible a few years 
ago. Shall he not have a parcels 
fpost? Each year the good roads 
movement originatingi. at the cities, 
Is extending Itself further into the 
real country. Trolley lines are ex- 
tending countryward; soon they will 
come actually to serve the farmer's 
needs. The telephone, as a separate 
rural enterprise is extending itself. 
Extensional educational enterprises 

are reaching further and further into 
the open farming districts. Co-opera- 
tion and organization movements are 
at the same time extending and con- 
creting themselves." 



Moral of a New Hall. 

It isn't every Grange that when It 
gets a new hall ready for occupanqy 
has as its class for the first meeting, 
therein an even half dozen young 
ladies. This is the experience of 
Lenox Grange, Susquehanna Countyr : 
But then the ladies like nice* new 
things and we suppose that this build- 
ing is the latest fall style in Halls. 
The moral is plain — ^build a hall, keep 
up to slyle and the ladies will flock 
in in half dozen bunches. 



Secretaries Make Good Showing. 

State Master Hill sent a letter to- 
each Subordinate Grange Secretary 
in the State. Altho the reply repre- 
sented considerable work, yet, with- 
in ten days from that date 371 re- 
plies had been received and filed In 
his oflfice. This promptness is highly 
creditable to the corps of Secretaries 
in the Granges of this State. It 
speaks well both for the individual 
and for the Grange of which he is a. 
type. Whenever Grange Oflficers dis- 
charge their duties promptly, accu- 
rately and courteously it elevates the^ 
entire order in the esteem of the gen- 
eral public. A Grange has a right 
to expect creditable work from Its 
Secretary. Most of the present ones- 
"make good." 



More large classes were Initlatecb 
in tihe Subordinate Granges of Penn- 
sylvania during the quarter ended 
June 30, 1905, than in any quarter 
for the last fifteen years at least. 



w 



SIGN OF CAUTION.' 

THE Secretary of a Subordinate Grange in Penn'a. some time ago 
received a personal letter from a g-entleman in his County. This 
gentleman was County Chairman or President of an organization 
there, and he wrote asking that the Grange should lend its in- 

fluence toward helping his association attain the object that it 

was aiming at. The Grange Secretary, feeling a little uncertain as to 
whether it was a matter into which the Grange should be drawn, sent the 
communication to the office of the Master of the State Grange and asked for 
. -counsel. The State Master has on different ocoasioms advised that no atten- 
tion be paid to communications that may come to Granges from outside or 
(unofficial sources. For over thirty years has the Grange been building in 
this State and now that it has become an established force and a recognized 
power, we must guard our strength jealously and reserve it for united legiti- 
mate use. While the object of the association represented by this gentleman 
Is worthy enough, yet it is not one that has been endorsed or approved by the 
State Grange. In fact, it may never be or even if it was it would be impru- 
dent for any Subordinate Grange to take action upon it at the behest of an 
individual who is in no wise identified with the offices of our "State Grange. A 
political campaign is on this fall and it behooves every subordinate Grange 
to be on its guard not to be misled by anonymous and designing circulars 
that may be sent with a view to influencing the votes or actions of members 
of our Order. Let us not allow the fire to be drawn from any Subordinate 
Grange in Penn'a. for any purpose or in any direction except authorized 
Grange purposes and in the direction toward which all of our guns are 
turned from all parts of the State at the same time. All communications 
from official sources'in the State Grange will be signed by the proper officers 
or Committees of the State Grange, Again I want to throw out the "sign of 
caution," , and urge you to ignore and throw into the waste-basket all irre- 
sponsible, unsigned or unofficial communications as it is only by being con- 
stantly guarded that the integrity of our organization can be preserved. 

W. F. HILL, 



A Lebanon County, Pa., farmer has 
'94 acres in corn and he is ready to 
wager that the entire field will aver- 
age 150 bushels of shelled corn per 
acre. What State in the Union wants 
to enter the contest with Penn'a, on 
big yield of farm crops per acre ? Of 
course, it is not forgotten that Penn'a. 
has the richest purely agricultural 
county in the United States. While 
56 per cent, of all the steel, iron and 
coal of the U, S, is also furnished by 
this great State. And she is still pro- 
gressing, as 10,000 more of her farm- 
ers are joining the Grange this year. 
She is all right. Stay with her and 
ishe will do you good. 



standing are eligible. The vote should 
be taken by ballot and without nomi- 
nations. The present incumbents are 
eligible to succeed themselves and It 
may be understood that the largest 
number of votes cast shall be con- 
sidered as the Pomona recommenda- 
tion. The Pomona Secretary should 
then promptly send to Bro. Hill the 
addresses of those recommended. 
Commissions will be issued at once 
and the addresses of the Deputies be 
correctly listed in the Register and 
elsewhere. Please do this whether 
changes are desired or not. 



The State Master uYges that each 
Pomona will, at the next meeting, 
recommend some member or mem- 
ibera for the position of Deputy. 
■S^ourth Degr«e members in good 



lona Grange No. 272 Bradford, is 
going to be up-to-date. Their new 
hall 24x50 ft. is going up this fall and 
will be a nice, two-story structure. 
With seventy-two names now on .the 
roll they have f cur applications now 
on hand, and are after more names 
to help get that 10,000. 



^ixemtive Committee ^e^mtmet\t 

G. W. OSTKR, Editor. 



The Grange Ck)-operative. 



HN Aug. 25, 1905, the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the 
State Grange concluded a 
trade arrangement with 
the Mail Order House of 

Lubin & Co., New York, which pro- 
vides a plan of genuine co-operation. 
Up to this time, trade arrangements 
have been of entirely another kind. 
It has been the custom of the house, 
with which a trade arrangement had 
been made, in some instances to al- 
low discounts to individual purchas- 
ers, in other instances to grant re- 
bates or commissions on the total of 
the purchases made. It is a fact that 
as a rule these discounts, rebates and 
commissions had to be added to the 
prices of articles before they were 
taken off. 

But the new trade arrangement Is 
made entirely on another basis. Every 
large business has its running ex- 
penses, whih are more or less uniform 
from time to time. If you know the 
total of the merchandise sold in a 
year, and the total cost of selling that 
much merchandise, then of course it 
Is easy to find how much it costs to 
sell $1.00 worth of goods. Now, it is 
the place of the wide-awake manager 
to reduce from day to day this cost 
of selling $1.00 worth of merchandise. 
It stands to reason that this cost may 
be reduced, even when the total cost 
of running the business is increasing, 
provided the total business done is 
Increasing at a still greater , rate. 

Now, the running cost may be re- 
duced chiefly in two ways: — (1) by 
Increasing the volume of business; (2) 
by decreasing the cost of advertising. 
(1) When the volume of business 
Is increased, the cost of running also 
Increases, but at a very much lower 
rate. If you double thQ business, you 
do not double the cost of rent, light, 
Insurance, labor and management. In 
fact, you may increase these but very 
little. Again, an increased volume of 
business makes a merchant a bigger 



buyer in the market, thus enabling 
him to obtain merchandise at some- 
what lower prices. 

(2) Advertising cost is decreased 
when an advertisement costing, let us 
say $10, reaches more people than a 
similar one did formerly, and brings 
in, consequently, more trade; or when 
it brings larger orders from former 
customers. 

The Grange Co-operative Arrange- 
ment makes it practically certain that 
Lubin & Company's cost of running 
will be reduced in these two ways. An 
increase in the volume of business is 
sure to be one result. And when you. 
Patrons of the Pennsylvania State 
Grange, understand the value of Lhe 
services the Mail Order House of Lu- 
bin & Company is prepared to render, 
you will become its voluntary adver- 
tisers. You will talk about It whe-> 
you meet your fellow patrons, and 
when you meet other acquaintance.-*. 
When it may cost Lubin & Company 
$1.00 to reach other customers, it may 
cost them only half that, qv even con- 
siderable less than half, to become 
favorably known to Patrong of the 
Grange. 

The Pennsylvania State Grange Is 
asked to share whatever saving re- 
sults from this new Co-operative 
Trade Arrangement. Any profit it may 
obtain is not an amount added to the 
prices of articles shown in Lubin & 
Company's advertisements. This Mall 
Order House does a. large business 
outside of the Grange. The values 
it offers In Its general bulletins are 
not excelled by any other mail order 
house, or by any large city store. The 
prices quoted in the Grange Co-oper- 
ative Editions are exactly the same as 
those given in Its general publications 
which compete with the largest cata- 
logues in the land. The Executive 
Committee, then, thinks It has made 
no mistake by arranging to co-oper- 
ate with this Mail Order House In 
such a way that you will obtain the 
best values to be found In the coun- 



try, and the most intelligent service, 
at the same time that the State 
Grange will receive financial benefit 
from any effort you will make in be- 
half of the Co-operative Arrangement, 
either by way of purchasing from Lu- 

bin & Company, or by way of speak- 
ing weli of them. 

But it is not enough to let the house 
«peak for itself. In a letter adressed 
to the secretaries on September 21st, 
as Secretary of the Executive Com- 
mittee, I said: 

"Before your Executive Committee 
finally concluded a Co-operative ar- 
rangement with this Mail Order 
House, we were fully convinced of 
their ability and their willingness to 
serve us well. 

"I have carefully examined more 
than, a hundred letters which they 
have received from Patrons through- 
out the country telling of the general 
satisfaction they are giving to the Pa- 
trons. In patronizing them, you have 
a double inducement. You are deal- 
ing with a House that is prepared to 
give you first grade service, a House 
that does not misrepresent in any way 
and that is second to none in the val- 
ues that it offers. But, furthermore. 



whatever profit is made on our pur- 
chases is shared with the State 
Grange. In other words a certain 
part of the total profits of the Penn- 
sylvania Grange trade is turned back 
into our surplus fund of the State 
Grange Treasury. 

"As a point of no little importance 
it might be well for you to call atten- 
tion to the fact that a considerable 
amount can be saved to each pur- 
chaser in the matter of express or 
freight charges by combining and 
clubbing your orders in bulk as much 
as possible and convenient. Further- 
more I wish to urge that you make 
plain to your membership this one 
point, that the State Grange will get 
credit for purchases made by mem- 
bers for outsiders provided that their 
orders are sent in by a Patron, and on 
the special Grange Co-operative Order 
Blank. It is therefore of the utmost 
importance that Patrons shall at all 
times use nothing but this specially 
prepared blank. For only then will 
we get credit for our purchases made. 

"This arrangement is, in my opin- 
ion, the most perfect and complete 
business arrangement that the State 
Grange has ever entered into with a 
house of this kind, and it will supply 
a long felt want and need of the 
Grange in our State. 

GEO. W. OSTBR, 



Nuggets from the State Secretary. 




INCE the earth and the full- 
ness thereof were made 
for all of God's creatures 
those who use a portion 
of them to the exclusion 
of others should pay for the privilege. 
Franchises, no less than coal beds, 
ore banks, oil fields, forests, etc., be- 
long to the community and should be 
held by the community. In most 
cases no doubt it would be better for 
all if they were operated by the com- 
munity. The selfish interests now in 
control seek to make the idea odious 
by the cry of paternalism. Paternal- 
ism has done much to preserve and 
truly develop the resources of Ger- 
many. It would do no less here. Pa- 
ternalism in this country has noth- 
ing of odium in it. Here the people 
are the source of power. They are 
the government. Hence what Is done 
by the government is their act. So 
f^r then as the government's action 



is paternalism, the people are their 
own parents. 

Government ownership of the 
bounties of nature and public utilities 
has not been formally endorsed by 
the Grange, but all granges are at 
liberty to discuss th^m and many do 
discuss them. 

The man or woman who h3,s gone 
to a Grange meeting and listened to 
and participated in a discussion on 
this or any other subject that is of 
interest to him as a man, a citizen or 
a farmer; and who has been, at the 
same time, entertained by music, Ift- 
erature and social Intercourse, has 
had an educational and moral uplift 
that has placed him a step in advance 
of his neighbor who has spent the 
same time nodding by the fire or loaf- 
ing in the country store. 

* 4t * 

It is a question whether any one 
should have a legal monopoly of an 



P 



Invention beyond the life time of the 
generation of the inventor. Without 
being able to use the brains and the 
labor of others how few men could 
produce a million dollars' worth of 
wealth! The claim that wealth right- 
ly belongs to the man who produced 
it is not easily assailable. Nor can 
the conclusion be resisted that men 
who have wealtlh that they did not 
produce, have that which rightly be- 
longs to some one else. Vast accu- 
mulations in the hands of the few are 
made at the expense of the many 
and must be harmful. In fact the 
equitable distribution of wealth is 
the great problem of the age. The 
inequalities are growing. The mil- 
lionaire of yesterday counts his hun- 
dred millions to-day. To-morrow he 
will talk of billions. How they do it; 
whether it should be done and if not 
what is the remedy are questions of 
great importance. They must be 
solved by the common people. 

Again the tax collector has posted 
his notices and the farmer will call 
upon him and pay four times as 
much tax as his neighbor who has the 
same amount of money invested in 
some other form of property. This 
will not always be so. The organized 
farmers in the Grange have won sub- 
stantial victories in the past and they 
will win even greater ones in the 
future. The Grange is fully equipped 
to do this work. The great need is 
numbers. The unorganized farmers 
Tiave no influence where law makers 

meet. 

* * * 

It is reported that Judge Parker, 
late Democratic candidate for Presi- 
dent, has been retained by a New 
York traction company at a salary of 
$100,000 per annum, and that a cer- 



tain railroad president hag h^d his 
salary increased to $120,000 a year. 
Most people will say that is a good 
thing for the Judge and the President 
and no doubt their employers will get 
in service full value for their money 
and that it concerns no one else. 
There are those, however, who look 
at the matter in a different light. The 
traction company and the railroad 
are not the real paymasters. In fact 
they do not pay at all, they take it 
from the users of the roads and 
many of these take it from some one 
else. The man who produces some- 
thing that men nee<i finally pays the 
bill. Some day, possibly, men will 
be paid on the basis of what they 
are really contributing to the 
general welfare. In that day there 
will be little need for corporation so^ 
licitors and railroad presidents. The 
work of these men now is not nearly 
so mudh to help make the enterprises 
with which they are connected more 
serviceable to the people as it is to 
enable their employers to get the ad- 
va'ntage of their competitors or to 
trample with impunity upon the 
rights of others. What is true of 
these 'two men Is no less true of many 
more of the brightest men of the age. 
Large salaries are paid them to use 
their talents In ways that confer no 
benefit whatever on the body politic. 
While we live in the best age, under 
the best government that the world 
has ever seen, the thoughtful, how- 
ever, cannot help but conclude that 
there is yet much room for improve- 
ment. Prpgress comes only with the 
growth of public sentiment and sen- 
timent from thought. Thought Is 
stimulated by contact of mind with 
mind. This is secured by organiza- 
tion. J. T. AIDMAN. 



We are in receipt of a copy of the 
annual statement of the Briar Creek 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, Bro. 
H. H. Brown, Sec'y. This company 
has been doing business thirty years 
and placed $1,757,495 of insurance 
last year, giving it a total of $5,995,- 
484. Co-operative insurance is a 
winner but they require careful at- 
tention and good business manage- 
ment. 



Bloomfield Grange, No. 958, Craw- 
ford County, initiated nine of its 217 
members at its last meeting in Sept. 

Two new Penn'a. Grange Halls 
are to be dedicated next month. Lenox 
Grange, 931, Susquehanna County, 
and lona Grange, No. 272, Bradford. 
Penn'a. Grange News extends con- 
gratulations to these two hustling 
Granges. 



8 



^egishihe §animittee §e^Hrtmmt 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 



Trolley Legislation at the Session 
of 1905. 



THERE were two bills Intro- 
duced allowing trolleys to 
carry freight. One in the 
Senate and one in the 

House. The one in the 

Senate was introduced by Senator 
Herbst, of Berks County, and reads 
as follows: 

Supplement to an Act, entitled, "An 
Act to provide for the incorporation 
and government of street railway 
companies in this Commonwealth." 
approved the 14th day of May, 1889, 
giving said companies the right to 
carry freight. 

Be it enacted, etc. That street rail- 
way companies heretofore incorporat- 
ed under the provisions of the Act of 
14th May, 1889, and its supplements, 
sTiall have in addition to the powers 
and privileges conferred by the said 
Act of 14th May, 1889, the right to 
carry package and bulk freight origi- 
nating on the line of said railway 
companies, to any point within the 
termini of the charter limife of said 
companies. 

As will be noticed this is a milder 
measure than the one introduced in 
the House. The Senate being in close 
touch with the great corporate in- 
terest of the State, it was thought 
possibly this might pass that corpo- 
ration body. But it didn't. It was 
reported out of committee and then 
reported back to the committee and 
never heard from. "Whether it died, 
strayed away or was stolen, no one 
knows. 

The House bill wag introduced by 
the editor of this department and 
reads as. follows: 

AN ACT. 

To authorize street railway companies 
and traction motor companies. 
Lessees of any street railway com- 
pany to carry freight and to charge 
and collect compensation therefore. 

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the 
Senate and House of Representatives 
of tbe Commonwealth of Pennsylva- 
nia in General Assembly met, and it 
Is hereby enacted by authority of the 
same, That any street railway com- 



pany heretofore or hereafter Incor- 
porated under the laws of this Com- 
monwealth, wliether under a general 
or special law, and any traction motor 
company, lessee of the whole or any 
part of the lines of any street railway 
company, is authorized to carry 
freight and to charge and collect a 
reasonable compensation therefore, 
and any limitation in the charter of 
any such company as aforesaid which 
restricts to the carriage of passengers 
only, is hereby repealed. Provided 
that the provisions of this Act be sub- 
ject to regulations of Borough and 
City Councils. 

This bill met with great favor 
throughout the State. It was framed 
and supported by the Grange as well 
as by all other business interests in 
the State except the steam railroads 
and their agents. 

The bill was brought before the 
House in one form or the other on 
four different occasions. At each 
time a vote was taken which Is re- 
corded in the jourual of the House 
proceedings. The bill was introduced 
early in the session and was referred 
to the committee on city passenger 
railways where it quietly slept for 
nearly two months, when on March 
6th a resolution was offered to dis- 
charge the committee from furth'er 
consideration of the bill. This reso- 
lution was defeated by a vote of 43 
in favor to 93 against. See Legisla- 
tive Record, page 814. 

On the 16th of March notice was 
given to the House that on Monday 
evening, March 20th, a resolution 
would again be offered to discharge 
the committee from further consider- 
" ation of the bill. In the meantime 
the committee met and agreed to re- 
port it out with a negative recom- 
mendation. When on the 20th of 
March a resolution was offered to 
discharge the committee, the commit- 
tee said they were ready to report but 
would not report. The resolution was 
declared out of order by the chair 
from which decision appeal was taken 
which was lost by a vote of 12 to 134. 
See Legislative Record, page 1206. 



I 



\ 



\ 



The only object I can see for not re- 
porting the bill was in the hope that 
no vote would be reached on the bill 
during the session. On March 21st 
the bill was reported froni committee 
with a negative recommendation. On 
the 27 th of March a resolution was 
offered to place the bill on the calen- 
dar. Under the rules of the House 
this resolution was laid over until 
next resolution day. On March 29th 
an efCort was made to amend the 
Street Railway bill of Representative 
Huhn by inserting a proviso that trol- 
leys should have the right to carry 
freight but this amendment was lost 
by a vote of 100 to 53. The test vote 
was taken on April 3d, when the res- 
olution w£is called up to place the bill 
on the calendar, notwithstanding the 
negative recommendation of the com- 
mittee. 

It was necessary under the rules 
of the House to have 103 votes to pass 
the resolution, while to discharge a 
committee it only required a majority 
of the members voting. 

The resolution was defeated by a 
vote of 66 in favor to 97 against it. 
The yeas and nays were as follows: 
This is the way the Legislators went 
on record: 

AYES — Ammerman, Balthaser.Bar- 
rett. Berry, Bowersox, Brann, Cope, 
Councilman, Creasy, Cressman, Duns- 
more, Eckels, Farley, Flack, Flynn, 
Garner, Hagerty, Harman, Hays, Her- 
riman, Hitchcock, Hockenberry, Hol- 
comb, Houck, Hoyt, James, King, 
Lambert, Lesher, Longsdorf, March, 
Matson, McLane, MoNeely, Mohr, 
Morse, Moyer, Noll, O'Brien, Pendle- 
ton, Place, Pomeroy, Reitmeyer, Rey- 
nolds, Robertson, Ross, Santee.Shock, 
Schofield, Sheller, Shields, Sipes, 
Smith, Stevens, Thomas, Thomas, 
Thompson, Thompson, Troxell, Walk- 
er, Wayne, Weida, Weingartner,With- 
erspoon, Zoortman. 

NOES — ^Alslip, Ambler, Bacon, Bei- 
delman. Black, Blough, Borger, 
Bougher, Buckley, Call, Clarency, 
Cook, Cook, Cooper, Crout, Dunn, 
Eaton, Edlis, Ehrhardt, Esler, Fahey, 
Field, Fliehr, Flyte, Funston, Gabriel, 
G-raybill, Haines, Heister, Henderson, 
Hohmann, Hoke, Homsher, H)o.od, 



Hostetter, Howard, Huhn, Hunter, 
Hutt, Jackson, Johnston, Kayser,Ken- 
nedy, Kennedy, Kline Landis, Laugh- 
lin. Little, Lukens, Maaree, Magee, 
Marsteller, McClaln, McElroy, Mint- 
zer, Moore, Morris. Morrison.Mumma, 
Murphy, Ober, Osborne, Ouram, Pal- 
mer, Palmer, Philips, Puhl, Pusey, 
Reese, Rex, Richards, Riebel, Riley, 
Ripp, Rose, Scott, Sedwick, Sheatz, 
Shenkel, Shern, Sitler, Smith, R. H. 
Smith, T. B. Smith, Snader, C. A. Sny- 
der, C. R. Snyder, Stradling, Stroup, 
Walton, Watkins, Wichersham, Wil- 
liams, Wittig, C. M. Wood, W. L. 
Wood, Woodward, Wrigley, Zietz. 
Ayes, 66; noes, 97. 
The balance of the 203 members 
either dodged the vote or were absent. 
Thus ended one of the hardest 
fights for trolleys to carry freight. 
But it can be won at the next session 
if the farmers go at it with a wilL 
Keep all members at home who are 
not openly in favor of this measure. 
The time has come that half-way 
promises are no good. Be sure not 
to return those members who dis- 
obeyed your wishes in this matter. 



In reply to many inquiries I will 
say that Hon. J. Lee Plummer, a 
member of the Legislature of 1905, 
and now a candidate for State Treas- 
urer, did not vote in favor of trolleys 
carrying freight. 



The Editor of this department is 
always pleased to receive the Ideas 
and suggestions of any patron. My 
address is Catawissa, Pa. 



The fight against the Beef Trust Is 
taking practical form. Five hundred 
retail butchers in New York have 
formed a company and are co-oper- 
ating for self protection. They re- 
cently celebrated the dedication of a 
fine slaughter house; 4,000 steers and 
18000 smaller animals may be dressed 
here per week. 

In Chicago restaurants and hotels 
have united with wholesale butchers 
and are erecting independent slaugh- 
ter houses. Each reader of Penn'a. 
Grange News who will buy and read 
"The Dark Side of the Beef Trust" 



lO 



will have a revelation made to him 
on the methods of that trust. Then 
we should all patronize the butcher 
who will buy and dress home grown 
stock. It will encourage and help 
him if we grow good beef cattle like 
the Durhams, Angus or Herefords. 
We need to all stand together. Or- 
ganization will tell here as every- 
where else. 



A Lucky Mishap. 

Under date of October 3, Bro. 
Oster writes as follows : 
Dear W. Master : 

I will scribble you a few lines to 
let you know^ my condition at present. 

There came mighty near being one 
Oster less on the Grange rolls. 

Last Thursday at 11 a. m., when 
I was up in a big pound apple tree 
some 20 or 25 feet, the limb broke 
and I lit on the ground about 2 or 
3 seconds later, "right on my head." 

Result : A badly bruised and cut 
forehead, face, nose and lip, and a 
broken cheek bone, a sprained neck 
(mighty near broken) a bruised shoul- 
der, and a badly stoved up body from 
my lower limbs up, a continual head- 
ache and soreness all over, and ex- 
cruciating pain all the time all over 
my left lip, nose and cheek from 
broken bone on down. 

I am getting around again now, and 
am trying to work some because I 
have it to do and can't get any one 
for love or cash- Everybody must look 
out for himself, it seems. I am not 
In shape to work, but must, in order 
to get it done in season. 



Important State Work to Help All. 

An effort is being made just now 
by Prof. H. A. Surface, of the Division 
of Zoology of the Pennsylvania State 
Department of Agriculture, at Harris- 
burg, to locate the San Jose Scale in 
every township of Pennsylvania in 
which this serious pest Is found. He 
wishes to call upon organizations such 
as the Grange to aid him in his im- 
portant work. He is commencing 
this month a series of practical dem- 
onstrations or public orchard meet- 
ings in each township in the State, 
where the San Jose Scale occurs, for 
the purpose of showing persons who 
attend the meetings how to make 
and apply the best remedies for this 
serious pest. He has recently sent 
out a circular saying : 

"This office will furnish, without 
charge, the necessary materia,! for 
demonstration at each orchard select- 



ed, a mounted spray pump and other 
apparatus, and an expert to do the 
spraying and give a talk at the or- 
chard on the day appointed and to 
examine specimens of twigs and fruits 
that may be brought to him to tell 
what pests infest them, and make in- 
spections of other premises and an- 
swer other questions. 

"The owner or manager of the or- 
chard is asked to do the necessary 
hauling of apparatus or to care for 
the operator and his horse (or do 
both) and to furnish a workman to 
help during the demonstration. All 
other expenses will be borne by this 
office and printed posters will be fur- 
nished to announce the dates and 
places of meetings. As soon as it Is 
decided to hold such a meeting at any 
orchard the owner will be notified and 
posters will be sent. 

The following questions should be 
answered fully and carefully : 1. 

Your name Post Office 

County 2. How far is your 

orchard from the post office ? What 
diir ction ? 3. Do you wish a meet- 
ing held in your orchard ? 4. Are 
'^ou willing to comply with the above 
conditions ? 5. Total number of trees 

in orchard 

No. of Apple Size or age 

No. of Peach Size or age 

No. of Plum Size or age 

No. of Pear Size or ag-e 

Are your trees badly, moderately or 
slightly infected with San Jose Scale ? 

(Which) 7. Have you 

sprayed your trees ? If so, when ? 
With what ? 8. Have you a spraying 
apparatus ? 

Please fill this sheet and return it 
with an infected twig to H. A. 
Surface, Economic Zoolog'ist, Harrls- 
burg, Pa. 

Members of the Grange and other 
persons interested are especially re- 
qustd to give this their attention at 
once, and if they wish a free public 
demonstration in their neighborhood 
fill the above blanlcs, and send the 
circular to Prof. H. A. Surface as soon 
as possible. This is a movement that 
can be handled by each Pomona for 
e- ery township in Its jurisdiction. 
Penn'a. Grange News suggests to Po- 
monas that they take It up. Write to 
Bro, Surface for full Information. 



Hegins Grange No. 1242 of Schuyl- 
kill County, has bought a lot In He- 
gins and is preparing to also build a 
hall for itself. Will the Order stand? 
No one now questions its continuance 
with all the evidences of permanency 
that are apparent In every county. 



II 



\tdte ^ectnr^/s ^otmti 



'J/ 

I' ' 

I 




1 DESIRE to urge the impor- 
tance of individual respon- 
sibility to forward the op- 
portunities now at hand 
for active Grange progress 
in all its far-reaching influence and 
usefulness. 

Do not wait for an invitation to at- 
tend the meetings and take part, for 
you and the Order ^ose each time you 
are absent. 

Every citizen has an influence and 
owes a duty to society to use that in- 
fluence for the common advancing to 
a higher standard of citizenship those 
with whom they are brought in touch. 
WTien using that influence in a good 
way the individual becomes stronger, 
that is more useful and more influen- 
tial; on the other hand, if opportuni- 
ties be neglected or the influence 
abused, the citizen and community 
weakens and suffers. 

(Strive to live out the teachings of 
the Grange and you will be building 
individual character that will not only 
make useful members of society but 
will help to make your community a 
better place to reside and the county, 
State and nation will profit by your 
precept. 



Questions to Consider. 

Do the citizens of your township 
favor the money road tax as provided 
by the law enacted by the last State 
assembly ? 

To what extent is the use of lime on 
land, beneficial to the production of 
crops? 

What measures does your Subor- 
dinate and Pomona Grange desire the 
next session of State* and National 
Grange to take action on ? 

To what extent does the so-called 
Beef Trust affect prices to the pro- 
ducer and consumer? 

The student of economic questions, 
who is familiar with the growing 
power and influences of the great or- 
ganizations of capital must rejplce to 
note the active interest the President, 
Mr. Roosevelt, Is taking In these mat- 
ters. In the address he delivered at 
Chautauqua, N. T,, Aug. 11, we were 



fortunate in hearing the closing sen- 
tence after discussing at length the 
great corporate interests, is so close- 
ly allied to Grange principles and 
contains such a ringing truth that we 
here invite all to read. 

"This republic will come to an 'end as 
surely as all republics in the past have 
come to an end, if this ever becomes 
a government of a class and it does 
not make any difference whther it is 
one class or the other. In either case 
the end of a republic is inevitable as 
soon as it becomes a republic of a 
class instead of a republic in which 
all men stand on an equal footing. 
Our republic should more and more 
become a government in which every 
man, rich or poor, stands on the same 
footing and has his rights guaran- 
teed to him." 

The Grange in a measure may be 
made the farmers' school. The de- 
bating society, the Agricultural Col- 
lege, the farmers' institute, the tax- 
payers' alliance, the social centre, the 
business and co-operative purchas- 
ing house, the musical institute, the 
insurance company, the political 
economy league, the domestic science 
circle. In short the Grange Is just 
what you make it, a broad and fer- 
tile field, ready for Immediate and 
future usefulness. 



Traveling IJibraries. 

People can not all own all the dif- 
ferent books they would like to read. 
Our State is supplying a long felt 
want with its provision for traveling 
libraries. The conditions can be easily 
met. Any Grange in fhe State can 
secure one containing fifty books. 
These can be kept six months and be 
then exchanged for another library 
of different books. Would it not be 
well for your Grange to have the Sec- 
retary write for full infoirmation upon 
the matter ? Address State Librarian, 
Harrisburg, Pa., and tell hirl^ that you 
wish to know about the libraries for 
Granges. These have been specially 
made up and contain a larger propor- 
tion of books that pertain to farm 
life. 



I 



12 



BELIEVES IN REFERENDUM. 



Obadiah Gardner Will Accept Presi- 
dency of New Maine Organiza- 
tion. 

Obadiah Gardner, of Rockland, 
Master of the State Grange, who re- 
cently was elected vice-president of 
the State Referendum League, said 
that the first he knew of his election 

to the office of president of the State 
Referendum League, was when he 
read of it in the papers. 

Mr. Gardner stated, however, that 
he thought that he should accept the 
ofilce. He was in sympathy with the 
principles of the referendum. He 
thought there was altogether too 
much government by commission and 
too little heed given to the voice of 
the people. 

"There are no politics in the meas- 
ure," said Mr. Gardner, "nor is it a 
Socialist measure as some regard it." 
Upon being asked if the Grange had 
endorsed it he replied some States, 
notably Pennsylvania, had done so, 
but there had been no attempt at en- 
dorsement by the Grange of Maine 
as a body. 

The State master said that he had 
been asked to take hold of the matter 
last year, but did not do so as he did 
not wish to commit the Grange to a 
policy which some of the members 
did not favor. 



of buying feed stuffs, etc. in carload 
lots. 



No. 



No. 



Since last report these granges have 
been organized. 

ROSEVILLE. 
12.90 — Master, R. J. Fitzsimmons, 
Brookville, Jefferson County. 
Lecturer, C. R. Morrison, Baxter. 
Sec, W. B. Cowan, Brookville. 

FRIEDENiSBURG. 
1291 — Master, S. B. Rylands, 

Friedensburg, Schuylkill Co. 
Lect.,H.W. Bressler,Friedensburg. 
Sec, H. S. Mengel. 
Re-organizations have been as fol- 
lows: 

UNITY. 
No. 793 — Master, J.R. Truxal, Greens- 
burg, R.F.D. 6, Westmoreland Co. 
Sec, Mrs. J. R. Truxal. 

JUNIATA. 
352 — Master, John N. Thompson, 
Petersburg, Huntingdon County. 
Sec, Miss May Hamer, Peters- 
burg, Huntindon County. 



No. 



On Sept. 16th the patrons of Lack- 
awanna County Pomona effected 
county organization for the purpose 



Pomona Meeting. 

The fourth quarterly meeting of 
Pomona No. 5, consisting of lower 
Luzerne and Columbia County for 
the year 1905 will be held at Ben- 
der town Hall, Friday, Oct. 27, at 
10 a. m. 

Every member of Pomona should 
make an effort to be present as it is 
the time of election of officers. The 
programme for the day will be both 
interesting and entertaining, consist- 
ing of music, recitations and Question 
Box. 



The next pieeting of Blair County 
Pomona Grange will be held Nov. 15, 
at Juniata, Pa. Fifty-six took the 
fifth degree at the last session of this 
Pomona and Grange principles are 
supreme in Blair. 



I have been receiving the Grange 
News and like it very much, and 
think that the Subordinate Granges 
should encourage it by sending ad- 
vertisements of wants and sales, and 
I will bring X before our Grange at 
next meeting and have no doubt but 
that they will be interested in it and 
will contribute to it. We are build- 
ing our new hall, Brandywine Grange, 
and' hope to have it completed before 
Thanksgiving, so we all are very busy 
at the present time. I hope to at- 
tend the National Grange so will see 
you there. Fraternaly yours, 

W. H. H. DAVIS, 



Advertises His Stock. 

Bro. R. S. Hartley, Grange No. 407, 
Warren County, sends in a card for 
our "Dicker" column and states that 
he will also exhibit at the Chicago Pet 
Stock Show. He writes that their 
Grange has added sixty members to- 
ward that 10,000 mark. Have had 
iniation at every meeting this year 
and are doing plenty of other good 
work besides. We are glad to see 
this Grange wakening from its leth- 
argy of a few years ago. It should 
bear its pretty name forward to a 
position beside the leading Granges 
of Pennsylvania. 



13 



Have just received a letter from the 
Trunk Line Association in which they 
grant us a rate of fare and a third 
to Sunbury without card orders. 
Tickets to be sold and good going 
Dec. 11 to 14, returning to 16th, in- 
clusive. J. T. AILMAN. 



WANTED TO BUY— One registered 
Holstein cow to become fresh this fall. 
Also one Chester White Boar; this fall 
pig. No fancy prices given. Address 

L. WINSHIP, 
Moscow, Pa. 



WANTED— 100 head of sheep. Good 
young breeding stock. Shropshires pre- 
ferred. Will buy small bunches. 

LOUIS PIOLETT, 

Wysox,. Pa. 



FOR SALE — ^Registered Jersey Cattle. 
Grolden Lad and St. Lambert strains at 
farmers' prices. 

Ouemsey Bull Calves, eligible to reg- 
istry. $25 each at four months old. 

Registered Tamworth swine all ages 
pairs not akin, two months' old at $12.00. 

R. S. HARTLEY, 
Master Brokenstraw Grange, No. 470 

Youngsville, Pa. 

WANTED — By the Lackawanna Coun- 
ty Pomona Grange, to buy mixed feeds 
in car load lots. Address, 

LIONEL WINSHIP, 
Purchasing Agent. Moscow, Pa. 

WANTED— 10 Black Minorca pullets; 
also, four cockerels. Write giving price, 
F. M. BALDWIN, 

Grange No. 1188. 
iSkinner's Eddy, Pa., R. F. D. No. 1. 



DO YOU want a good shorthorn cow, 
bull, heifer or calf of choice dairy 
breeding at reasonable rates. If so, write 
L. R. HOTOHKISS. 
West Springfield, Erie County, Pa. 
Grange No. 1257. 

FOR SALE — One McCormick corn 
husker and shredder, nearly new, at less 
than half price. Address, 

J. T. DAVIS, 
Grange No. 534, Grampian, Pa. 

FOR SALE — One thoroughbred Short- 
horn bull, IS months old, color red, price 
$50. One red bull 13 months old, price 
$40; and one roan bull, 13 months old, 
price $40. All eligible to registry. 

D. B. FISHER, 
R. F. D. No. 2, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 



GREENWOO- STOCK FARM. 

Thoroughbred stock for sale. Guern- 
sey cattle. Chester White and Poland 
China Swine a specialty. Young stock 
for sale at all times. Fancy show stock 
or the large prolific kind. * Barred 
Plymouth Rock Poultry. All breeding 
stock recorded. Write for prices. Farm 
and residence. Greenwood, Pa. Address, 
C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Pa., 

Route No. 1. 



OUR 



Christmas Catalog 

^ 1905 ^ 



Now ready. Sent free upon receipt ot postal 
^card ^ith address. 

Hoover & Smith 

\ 

Succeeding the Diamond, Watch, Jewelry 
and Cut Glass Departments of the well-known 
and long established firm of 

SIMONS, BRO. & CO. 

6i6 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



To Grange Members — Upon presentation 
of Trade Card we allow lo per cent, discount. 



TIVADC 



Pratt's Scalecide pS«m 

MARK 

■ 

The Best and Cheapest Spray 

for 

San Jose Scale 



Remarkable results obtained 
wherever tried. Favorably 
commended by experiment 
stations in the Northern Fruit 
Belt. Write for Circulars. 



B. G. PRATT CO. 

II BROADWAY. 

NEW YORK CITY. 



14 



PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT — ^It's time for you to go. 




5 



Reproduced from the Ohio State Journal, August 13, illustrative of President 
Roosevelt's prreat scoring of the Beef Trust at the Chautauqua Assembly, 
August 11, 1905. 



HAVE YOU READ THE GREAT BOOK, 

THE DARK SIDE OF THE BEEF TRUST 



.Before you buy Extract of Beef, C5omed Beef, Canned Meats of any 
description, Sausage, or any of the Manufactured Products of the great Pack- 
ing Houses of the Beef Trust, you shouild read tlds book, and learn how all 
these products are manufactured, and what becomes of the hundreds of thou- 
sands of old and disordered animials and "Canners" that are gathered from all 
parts of the country and shipped to tiie Beef Trust and manufactured Into 
animal foods for the people to eat. And learn how the farmer and the cattle 
raiser are compelled to sell animals at low prices, and how meat and meat 
pi*oducts are sold at exorbitant prices. 

The great newspaper press and public opinion says this book should be 
read by every human being. 

Buy it now— -on sale everywhere.. 160 pages, bound in cloth, 75 cents^ 
Paper 50 cents. 

Order from State Grange Officers, or direct from the publisher, 

THEODORE Z. ROOT, Jamestown, N. Y, 



i HMMr, W. r. HtU. ChaAI>or>M>s P*. 
Hi UotaKr,.A. M. CoiMU, ColumtXt X. Rooda, P» 
^ tttwanM'. S. K.'IUvlii, UadaobUF^, Pa. 
accrturr, i. t. Anm>a,*Tbom;*OD(awn, Pa. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

STATE&GRANGE 

PATRONS OF HUSBAKttRt 
orr/cr or mastch. 



m txtcvTtve coMM/rrre roii ims X 

^ W. r. um, ClumbtnbiUT. Pa, # 

j>. f'Frank.Ckai>dler,Ta«gtiliraamoo,Pa. S 

c. H..OlMiM, ■okn^Uf, Pit. S 

O.W.o««ar;Oacer»)jvg,Pa. secy of comijititea f 
aadlaciurg«ocBantaeflD(onutlon. * 



■^ ClIA^^DERODURO, l » A., 



West GheBtej-, Au^st 25, 1905, 



1905. 



Peiaovf Patrons X 

« 

On this date we hare made s Cooperative arrange- 
ment with the Mail Order Hou-se of txibin & Company of Hew York, 
whereby the State Grange is to ehare in the profits resulting 
from all business done between Lubin & Company and the patrons of 
the Pennsylvania State Gfange, Bhe arrangement provides for a 
sharing of the profits, not^for .the glvljag of.«iscountB 6f rebileS. 

Pull details of this au-rangement , and an explan- 
ation of -the exact benefits to be derived by the ^brange will be 
Itlvien in the next issue of the Orange News, a copy of which wfll 
be sent to you^ 

Always use tlxe special order-1)aanlt when ordering, 
to the end that the State oraiige aiay; get credit for ^11 purcAases 
Aade under this Co-operative Arrangement, 

nratemaljy yoTirt^^ 



^Isecutlvd' (fomniittee 







"New Toric Is the Commercial Center 
of America. The large manufacturers 
and importers have their main offices 
here. Styles are made or modified here. 
Buyers from all over the country flock 
here to learn what are the season's cor- 
rect things. This Is America's greatest 
Market-place, 

"But can you take advantage of all 
the great opportunities New York has 
to offer 1 

"The exclusive New York Mall Order 
House has Its buyers always on the spot. 
They are ever ready to take advantage 
of the best, In value and style, which 
this niaiket afTorda 

"The exclusive Mall Order House has 
Its force of trained people, whose pur- 
pose Is to please those whom they know 
only through correspondence. 

"We are an exclusive Mail Order House 
situated In New York City. Our sole 



business Is to fill your orders In a satis- 
factory way; we do not turn them over 
to sales-people to be filled at their leisure 
moments. Our Bulletins bring before 
you the best values and the best styles 
New York can show; oetter styles ana 
values than you couM obtain by personal 
retail shopping, If our experience counts 
for anything. 

"We sell for cash In advance only. We 
give no discounts, premiums, or commis- 
sions; things that In the end benefit, If 
they benefit anyone, those only who get 
them at the expense of those who do 
not. 

"We permit no exaggerations to eniter 
Into the makeup of our pictures or de- 
scriptions. Accuracy and truthfulness 
characterize our advertisements. We 
fill your orders promptly. We answer 
letters courteously." 



THE GRANGE • 
CO-OPERATIVE MAIL ORDER HOUSE 

(by ARRANGBMENT with the PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE) 

LUBIN 6 COMPANY, 27 WALKER STREET, NEW YORK 

*^This arrangement is, in my opinion, the most perfect and complete business arrange- 
ment that the State Grange has ever made."*^ — -Geo. W. Oster, Sec^y Exec, Com. 



Golf Blouse 

Gi. GOLF BLOUSE 
of all wool zephyr yarn. 
Knitted in new fancy stitch 
with pla,in front narrow 
ribbed turn-over collar, 
narrow cuff and ribbed 
waist. Perfectly finished, 
all seams being covered ; 
with 6 pearl buttons d(|)wn 
front. Come in Wnite, 
Cardinal or Navy. S^.^es, 
34 to 42. Weight, /s oz. 

$1.45 




LUBIN & COMPANY'S 

SEASONJULLETIN 

If you have not received a 
copy of the 

''Special Grange Co- 
operative Edition, " 

write for one to 

LUBIN & CO. 
27 Walker St. N««w York 



Write to Lubin & Co. for 

Ml of Spscial Grange 
Co-operative Ord^r Blanks 




G2. DRESS SKIRT, made of an al- 
most all wool Broadcloth. The cotton 
threads give firmness and durability to 
the cloth. In the most favored style for 
this season, a circular effect, with 52 
plaits, which are stitched to a line below 
the hips, and then open into wide flare. 
The plaiting and the fulness are the 
features of this skirt. In Blue, Black 
or Brown cloth. Weight, ready for 
shipment, 35 oz $3.90 




G3. RAIN COAT, double breasted, 
with loose fitting front. Collarless 
effect with four rows of stitching. Wide 
box plait in center d'f back, with plait 
on either side ; self-ljelt witli four but- 
tons. Full sleeve, plaited at top; fancy 
turn-over cuff trimmed with three self 
buttons. In Tan, Olive or Oxford Gray. 
Weight, wrapped for shipment, 3 
pounds $6.85 



# 



If 

k 









Ai 




THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



4lranfl^ JteTO 



\A 



V 




^ommhcVf t905 



■-. . , ■ v; ■■ .,,'#., 



r 



Pennsylvania State Grange 
Meeting Next Month. 

Most important, largest attended, 
most representative gathering of the 
entire year, in behalf of the farm in- 
terests of Pennsylvania. Preserve this 
copy. If you come to Sunbury you 
will need the Hotel and Railroad in- 
formation it contains. 

Sunbury Arrangements. 

This issue contains announcements 
of the railroad and hotel arrange- 
ments for the State Grange meeting at 
Sunbury, Dec. 11-16, 1905. This su- 
percedes the circular sent to Masters 
of Subordinate Granges in previous 
years, as Penn'a. Grange News is be- 
ing made the official medium for con- 
veying and disseminating Grange in- 
formation. Preserve your copy, as 
you will probably want to take it with 
you to the State Grange meeting. 

This publication ig authorized to 
announce that any who wish to en- 
gage board and lodging in adyance 
may do so. Address Mr. J. G. Ches- 
nutt, Sunbury, Pa., and state wha^ 
price you wish to pay, whether you 
want a room witli or without board, 
number in your party and number in 
a room. Mr. Ohesnutt, of the city, is 
taking a very active interest in see- 
ing that every comfort may be en- 
joyed by all Patrons attending this 
session. The best people of the city 
are appreciating its importance. The 
Judge has dismissed court for that 
week, fche ministers announcing the 
meeting from the pulpit and com- 
mending its importance to their 
parishioners. 

Bro. Dildine is leading the forces 
and it is now assured that Decembe^ 
11-16, "All Roads Will toad to Sun- 
bury. 

Has your Grange added its share 
of those 10,000 ne^ members ? 
There's a little time yet. 

Better Get "After 'Em." 



■^ 



J 




m 




VOL. n. No. 4 



NOVEMBER, J905 



25 Cents peh Year. 
5 Cents per Copi' 



Editor. 
G. W. OSTER, W. T. CREASY. 

Editor Executive Committee Department. Editor I^egislative Committee Departtceat 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered August 9, 1904. at Chambersburg,' Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



EDITORIAL. 



Pennsylvania State Grange Headquarters, Atlantic City, N. J. 

A temperance: hotel. 



MANY letters of inquiry are reach- 
ing this office with reference to 
hotel accommodations at Atlantic 
City for the meeting of the National 
Grange there November 15th to 24th. 
Not knowing the character of the 
many hotels at this resort, I made a 
trip there recently to see whether it 
were possible to arrange with a hotel 
that would be satisfactory in all re- 
spects for Pennsylvania Patrons, as 
there was a desire to have a Penn'a. 
headquarters where we might meet 
and associate with our own friends 
from this State. After considerable 
investigation and careful considera- 
tion I became satisfied that it was 
the part of wisdom for us to go only 
to a first-class hotel of recognized 
standing and good repute. I have ac- 
cordingly arranged with the Hotel 
Strand ag headquarters for the Penn'a 
State Grange at th«> rate of two dol- 
lars per day, per guest, for board and 
lodging. We are promised first-class 
care and treatment in all respects at 
this hotel. It is of brick; its bed- 
rooms, dining room and general in- 
terior impressed me as being a most 
desirable, home-like hotel. It is di- 
rectly on the ocean front. From the 
dining room as well as from many 
of the bedrooms guests have an un- 
obstructed view of the ocean nearby. 
It is a temperance houise, having no 



bar. It is within one minute's walk of 
the new Steel Pier where the grange 
sessions will be held, is directly across 
the street from the National Grange 
headquarters and is at the foot o-f 
Pennsylvania Avenue, the finest and 
widest avenue at Atlantic City. It is 
free from outside noises as no street 
car or railroad tracks are allowed on 
this Avenue. I am assured by the 
proprietor that the rate given us is 
fifty' cents a day lower than they ever 
accorded any convention before and 
as it will be more plca.sant for us all 
to be together, I suggest to those who 
expect to attend this session that you 
write Hotel Strand, Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, tell them the number that will 
be in your party, the date that you ex- 
pect to arrive, and ask that accommo- 
dations be reserved for you. Be sure 
to state the number of rooms that are 
desired so that they will know wheth- 
er one or two will occupy a room. The 
booking will then be made for you 
in advance, and when you reach the 
hotel your rooms will be ready for 
you. There are two railroad stations 
at Atlantic City, the Pennsylvania, 
and the Reading, and upon arrival at 
either of these stations you will no- 
tive a large number of 'buses backed 
up to the curb. The arrangement made 
with the management of this hoteJ 
is to the effect that if you take a 'bus 



m.-' 



having on it a placard "STRAND" 
the charge for your transportation to 
the hotel is to be ten cents. Other- 
wise it may be twenty-five cents or 
more. These matters are mentioned 
for your protection, as there are al- 
ways plenty of people at every such 
resort who know how to charge for 
every accommodation rendered. 

A booklet descriptive of this hotel 
is being sent to the Master of each 
Grange In Penn'a. direct from the 
hotel. 

If you check your baggage and will 
hand the check to the Hotel Clerk he 
will have it brought up from the sta- 
tion and put in your room at a reason- 
able charge. 

While $2.00 per day seems a little 
high, yet at a resort like this, it al- 
ways pays for a few days this way, to 
stop at a good hotel, where one feels 
secure from risk and dissatisfaction. 



If Good For One; Good For All. 

A year ago the steel rail manufac- 
turers of America, Germany, France 
and England arranged an internation- 
al pool for regulating markets and 
competition. 



There are also several international 
Unions for regulating public business. 
The latest enterprise to seek the ben- 
efit of an international organization 
is agriculture — the foundation indus- 
try. The proposed International Ag- 
ricultural Institute at Rome is at- 
tracting favorable attention of the 
leading statesmen in the various 
countries of the world. In convening 
Parliament recently. King Edward, of 
England, spoke sympathetically and 
encouragingly of it in his message to 
that body. The Minister of Finance 
for Denmark hjis recommended to his 
Government that it make appropria- 
tion for its share of the necessary ex- 
penses. The United States Govern- 
ment should share in the benefits of 
th|s world movement and the farmers 
sl^uld insist that this recognition 
shall be accorded to them, to their 
interests and to the importance of our 
Government among the Governments 
of the earth. Members of Congress 
and the President will soon be called 
upon to accept the proposition for the 
United States. Let them know that 
you want this Government to partici- 
pate In It. 



Please present this at your next Grange meeting. 

The Congress of the United States will convene in a few weeks and a 
measure of great importance that will come before it for action is the amend- 
ment of the Oleo Law of August 2, 1886. Line 15 of Section 6 of that Act 
reads now : "Every person who KNOWINGLY sells or ofCers for sale * ♦ 
oleomargarine," etc., "Shall be guilty," etc. Altho this law was passed 19 
years ago many violators of its provisions escape their proper punishment, by 
pleading that they did not "knowingly sell," etc. The amendment proposes 
no change in the law except to strike out the word "KNOWINGLY" in that 
connection. Pennsylvania is a great dairy State and it is proper that the 
State Grange shall continue to lead in the fight for the adequate protection 
of the dairy interests. I suggest, therefore, that each Subordinate Grange 
pass resolutions favoring this amendment so that violators may not escape 
punishment because of this loophole. Then send a copy, duly attested, to the 
Member of Congress from your District, one to each United States Senator, 
and one to President Roosevelt. In the work of strengthening the law the 
co-operation is asked of all kindred organizations and of the agricultural 
press of the country, and of all who stand for respectful observance of law. 

There should be a Legislative Committee in each Subordinate and Po- 
mona Grange. Do you have such a committee ? If not it will be well to 
appoint one — of say three members — with the W. Master as one. By co- 
operating with the State Grange Legislative Committee there would be a 
complete chain and our organization would be strengthened. Penn'a. Grange 
News will, thru its Legislative Department (Bro. Creasy Editor) suggest work 
for all Committees on oleo, tax, road and other public questions as occasion 
shall demand. These Committees should see to it that matters referred to 
Granges by the State Grange Committee are considered in their Granges and 
acted upon. ' Fraternally 




mcntive Committee ^ef^urtmerft 

G. W. OSTER, Editor. 




Official Aimouiicemeaits for the State 
Grange Meeting. 

H E Thirty-third Annual 
Sessions of the Pennsyl- 
vania State Grange will 
convene in Sunbury, Pa., 
in the Armory at 10:30, 
a. m., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 1905. The 
Credentials Committee will be in ses- 
sion at 9:30 and all who can should 
present their credentials before the 
opening. 

Any delegate who may not be al- 
ready provided with representative 
badges should send at once to The 
Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, N. 
J., and '^et them. Send $1.00 for two, 
giving the name and number of youi 
Grange. 

The mileage of delegates will no 
doubt be paid as usual. The delegates 
themselves decide the matter. 

As to who are members of the 
State Grange, see Constitution of 
Penn'a. State Grange, Article 2, Sec- 
tions 1, 2 and 3. 

In case the wife or husband of the 
delegate cannot come, the Grange 
cannot substitute another member 
and have his fare paid. 

The Sixth Degree will be con- 
ferred on Wednesday evening. All 
Fourth Degree members who bring 
evidence of good standing in their 
Subordinate Granges may receive this 
degree. Any who have not already 
taken the Fifth Degree, may be obli- 
gated in this degree and receive the 
Sixth in full form. The initiation fee 
for the Fifth will be taken and after- 
ward sent by the State Secretary to 
the Secretary of the Pomona Grange 
to the jurisdiction of which the mem- 
ber belongs^ The fees for member- 
ship in the Pomona are $1.00 for 
men and 50 cents for women. The 
Sixth Degree fee is $1.00 for all alike. 

Rail Road Arrangennenta. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad, Includ- 
ing all of its branches, the Lehigh 
Valley, the Philadelphia & Reading. 
New York Central & Hudson River, 



the Delaware, Lackawana & Western, 
the Erie, the Central R. R. of New 
Jersey, the New York, Ontario & 
Western and the Baltimore & Ohio 
will sell excursion tickets to any one 
who wants them without card orders. 
The roads in the western part of the 
State, which belong to the Central 
Passenger Association, will sell as 
heretofore on the certificate plan. Any 
one traveling on these roads will buy 
a ticket and pay full fare for it. The 
local agent will give you a certificate 
which you will present to me at Sun- 
bury. I will sign it and return it to 
you. You will present it to the ticket 
agent at Sunbury and he will sell you 
a return ticket at one third the reg- 
ular rate. That these certificates may 
be of use to you, it is necessary that 
you buy your ticket through from 
your home station to Sunbury. 

Arrangements with branch roads 
have not yet been completed. Most of 
them will no doubt do as they have 
done before, sell tickets on the same 
plan as the roadg of the Trunk Line. 
Should any of them require card or- 
ders these will be mailed in due time 
to those needing Ihem. You should 
look up your route in good time and 
consult your local agent as to wheth- 
er he has received instructions in re- 
gard to the sale of tickets. Our ex- 
perience in the past has been that 
while these rates have been ' granted 
to us by the Passenger Association 
not all local agents are notified. If 
you inquire in time at your local of- 
fice and inform me at once if he has 
not been instructed to sell excursion 
tickets without card orders, I will 
see to it that he gets proper instruc- 
tions. Do this in time. Do not wait 
until you are ready to start for Sun- 
bury and then expect to have things 
' straightened out on a moment's no- 
tice. 

Hotel Arrangements. 

Neff Hotel (headquarters) 75, pos- 
sibly 100 persons, $1.50 per day. One 
square from the Opera House, 3 from 
the Armory. 



Clemont House, 50 persons, $1.25 
per day, 3d St., one-half square from 
Opera House, two and one-half from 
Armory. 

Fairmount House, 20 persons, $1.00, 
6 squares from Opera, 2 from Ar- 
mory. 

Packer House, 25 persons, $1.25, 
2% squares from Opera, 2% from 
Armory. 

Zerbe Hotel, 10 persons, $1.00, 4 
squares from Opera, 1 from Armory. 

St. Charles, 14 persons, $1.25, 3 
squares from Opera, 4 from Armory. 

Susquehanna, 12 persons, $1.00, 2^ 
squares from Opera, 3 from Armory. 

Hotel Eyster, 8 persons, $1.00, 2% 
squares from Opera, 1 from Armory. 

Empire, 6 persons, $1.25, 1 square 
fro'm Opera, 2 from Armory. 

City Hotel, 100 persons, $2.00, 2^^ 
squares from Opera, 1 from Armory. 

Central Hotel, 100 persons, $2, 2 1^ 
squares from Opera, 2 from Armory. 

Arrangements are being made at 
many private houses for the enter- 
tainment of guests at $1.25 per day. 

Rooms fifty cents per day with 
privilege of taking meals at any of 
the half dozen excellent restaurants. 
Prices are very reasonable in the res- 
taurants. 

Three good hotels are located at 
Shamokin Dam, just across the 
river. A steam ferry connects the 
two places charging 5 cents for the 
round trip. Northumberland and 
Selinsgrove are within easy reach 
both with good hotel accommodations. 

NOHTHUMBERIjAND. 

Vankirk, 14 people, $1.50 per day; 
lodging and breakfast, 75c, Queen 
and Front Streets, 1 square from 
Station. 

Kessler, 12 people, $1.50 per day; 
lodging and breakfast, 7 5c, Duke 
Street, opposite station. 

Palmer, 10 people, $1.50 per day; 
lodging and breakfast 75c, Water 
Street, opposite station. 

Washington, 6 people, $1.25 per 
day; lodging and breakfast 75c, Mar- 
ket and Northway, 3 squares from 
station. 

Exchange, 2 people, $1.25 per day; 
lodging and breakfast 75c, Queen and 
Fourth Streets, 4 squares from 
station. 



Ulps (Boarding) 6 people, $1.0(>- 
per day; lodging and breakfast, 50c, 
Duke Street, opposite station. 

Trains leave Northumberland for 
Sunbury : 6:05, 7:46, and 9:37 a. m.; 
1:40, 5:07, 6:40, and 8:21, p. m. 

Trains leave Sunbury for North- 
umberland at : 6:00, and 9:42, a. m.; 
1:13, 5:10, 6:30 and 9:53, p. m. 

The reception committee headed by 
Bro. C. H. Dildlne, a member of the 
State Grange Executive Committee, 
will have a reception room or Bureau 
of Information in the Armory and all 
Patrons on arriving in the city should 
go there. 

The coming session promises to be 
large and enthusiastic. Come pre- 
pared to help make it profitable. If 
you intend to introduce resolutions do 
not fail to have them ready, having 
at least two copies, one for the com- 
mittee and one for the SP'^'-etary. 

J. T. AIIvMAN, Secretary. 



Resolutions for consideration by the 
National Grange. 

The delegates to represent the State 
of Pennsylvania Patrons of Husband- 
ry, in the National Grange, consist of 
the Master of the Penn'a.State Grange 
and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. 
Hill. Resolutions, or any matters of 
interest that the Granges or members 
wish to have brought before the Na- 
tional Grange at Atlantic City,conven- 
ing Nov. 15, should be forwarded to 
the Master's ofl;ice,Chambersburg,Pa., 
at earliest convenience, or not later 
than Nov. 18, to headquarters. Seaside 
Hotel, Atlantic City. Remember, we 
are willing to present to the National 
Grange all practical matters of im- 
portance Or interest to the order and 
to farmers generally. 



Copies of Penn'a. Grange News were 
sent, last month, to each family in 
several Granges. If the Secretary 
were to give the members an opportu- 
nity to subscribe, thni him, he doubt- 
less could get a good list from his 
Grange. Twenty-five cents a year is 
pretty cheap for so much solid read- 
ing matter of a high order 

Will we get a list from you ? 



I 



'I 
I 



\tnte ^ectur^/s ^arnei[ 



Bro. Oster's fall of twenty feet out 
of an apple tree resulted in two or 
more broken bones. We all hope that 
he will be patched up "good as new" 
again. 



Through the kindness of the several 
Pomona Grange Lecturers, data, rela- 
tive Grange libraries in the State 
has recently been gathered for mutual 
benefit and to stimulate greater ac- 
tivity in extending the usefulness of 
this branch of Grange work. 

Many people of rural life do not 
have access to an assortment of de- 
sirable books and do not feel that 
they can afford to procure them; but 
by that "concert of effort" among 
many, there is scarcely anything that 
can not be attained by the "Going 
after it." 

Therefore, we are pleased to find 
there are a number of Granges in the 
State that have been after libraries 
and got them, that offer fine oppor- 
tunities for their members. 

Wellsboro Grange of Tioga County, 
for instance, have a library of value 
and have of late added a very desir- 
able work, entitled, "The Nature Li- 
brary," published by Doubleday, Page 
& Co., New York, consisting of ten 
volumes, four thousand pages, 10^/4 x 
8 inches, two thousand, two hundred 
and fifty illustrations, treating fully 
on the specie and nature of vege- 
tables and animal life, making it pos- 
sible for their members to have a 
better knowledge and love of naure 
and the wonderful works thereof. 

While we rejoice that there are 
Granges in the State not only enjoying 
and profiting by the use of their own 
library, yet we find there are many 
Granges that have not as yet made 
the effort that has resulted in bring- 
ing success and to those we would 
suggest that the matter be consid- 
ered and possibly the time is now ripe 
for your Grange to start a library. 

It is a work that would be 
well for the Lecturer to take up as 
the leading spirit, yet do not expect 
too much on the start, but remember 
"Mighty oaks from little acorns 
grow." 



Below is given the date and place 
of several Pomona Granges, that are 
to hold their fourth quarterly session 
for 1905. 

No. 10, Warren County is to meet 
with Columbus Grange at Columbus, 
Dec. 7-8. Young people have a spec- 
ial feature. 

No. 19, Wyoming County is to meet 
with Tunkhannock Grange at Tunk- 
hannock, Wednesday, Dec. 6. Bi- 
ennial election of officers. This Po- 
mona grange has large and interesting 
meetings with a growing interest and 
now has a membership of 275 fifth 
degree members. 

No. 23, Bradford and Sullivan Coun- 
ties, is to meet with Towanda Valley 
Grange at West Franklin Nov. 10-11. 
Bi-ennial election of ofl^icers. 

No. 25, Mercer County, is to meet 
at New Vernon Grange Hall, Nov. 1. 

No. 33, Clearfield County, is to 
meet at Clearfield, Nov. 16; three 
sessions, 10, a. m., 1:30 and 7:30, p. 
m. Bi-ennial election of ofl!icers in 
the afternoon. 

No. 37, Blair County, is to meet 
at Juniata Nov. 15. Fine program 
arranged with discussions on the fol- 
lowing topics : "The Parcel Post," 
"Potato Culture," How can Farmers 
Better Secure Enactment of Legisla- 
tion Such as is needed for the Pro- 
tection of their Interests," etc. 

No. 41, Wayne County, is to meet 
with Pleasant Valley Grange at Dy- 
berry, Nov. 15-16. Bi-ennial election 
of officers. Arrangements are being 
made for an interesting meeting. 

No. 44, Luzerne County, is to meet 
at Beaumont, Dec. 16. Luzerne Coun- 
ty has good Pomona meetings. 

No, 54, Potter County, is to meet 
at Gold, Dec. 21, There is a growing 
interest in Grange work in this 
county. 



In a recent letter from a good 
Brother, who is just passing middle 
life, and only a member of the order 
a few years, these impressive lines 
appear : "What a pity I was not a 
member of the Grange when I was 
a young man; I feel as if I have lost 
many golden opportunities." 



8 



Possibly more truth than flction.and 
do not all who have been actively 
affiliated with the Grange owe a last- 
ing debt of gratitude to the order, for 
the developing influence it has had 
upon their lives, and knowing this, 
what better offering for the order 
could be put forth than to labor to 
bring many more farmers and their 
families in touch with this great de- 
veloping influence of the Grange, that 
displaces ignorance and uncouthness, 
with culture and refinement, which 
brings progress and success out of 
indifference and failure — establishing 
system and order where confusion 
and degeneracy reigned — planting 
fraternal fellowship and brotherly 
love where many have grown that fa- 
tal tree enmity. 



State Grange, he helps to make 
Penn'au" Grange News. Tell your 
friends to send a quarter of a dollar 
and get all the good things. 



Months and weeks have rapidly 
Bhortened into a few days, seemingly, 
now before Penn'a. Patrons assemble 
in the thirty-third annual session at 
Sunbury for that great and growing 
business, social and fraternal occa- 
sion, that has come to be the crown- 
ing yearly event of the order, noted 
for enthusiasm and inspiration, that 
radiates over all parts of the State, 
stimulating those who attend with 
renewed devotion and activity. 

That the greatest good to the larg- 
e&t number may result, it is essential 
for all who can to be present. Come 
you will be welcome to take part and 
partake of the many desirable fea- 
tures that present themselves. Come 
with the feeling that it is our meet- 
ing not their meeting — a meeting of 
farmers to counsel and act relative to 
the welfare of the Agriculturist, his 
home, and his country. 

; 

Those who have access to Bro. 
Creasy's articles can congratulate 
themselves that they have such a good 
authority on legislative matters. He 
is now a member of the Pennsylvania 
House of Representatives, and, hav- 
ing been there for ten years, knows 
the work of that body thol'oly. He 
assumes full responsibility for his 
writings and no one has ever ques- 
tioned his honesty and fairness. His 
statements are reliable. As Secretary 
of the Legislative Committee of the 



Wonder if Penn'a. Grange News 
wouldn't be a good missionary to 
"pull" members into your Grange ? 

How would it do to pick out a few 
families in the neighborhood whom 
you would like to have in, send the 
address of the head of each, together 
with a quarter to Penn'a. Grange 
News, Chambersburg, Pa., and let It 
talk to the family every month for 
a year ? It will fetch them into your 
Grange — with your assistance — and 
then everybody will feel better — will 
be better. 



The Importance of Agriculture 

Grain Crop Figures — Train to haul 
United States grain crop thig year 
would be 11,931 miks long. 

There would be more than 1,500,- 
000 cars to the train. 

To haul it 37,500 locomotives wou/d 
be needed. 

The value of the crop at present 
prices is $1,873, 518,333. 



UNCERTAIN. 



'Tis money makes the mare go. 

They say; 
But tlien statistics do not siiow 

Which way. 
Sometimes the beast treads straight 

ahead 
To where fame's brilliant light is shed. 

'Tis money makes the mare go 

'Tis True; 
She may ride swift to joy, I know. 

With you. 
But then, again, the nag may stray 
And carry me some other way. 

'Tis money makes the mare go 

No doubt; 
Her steps a halting gait would show. 

Without. 
And oftentimes cash stirs the pluck 
And leads the animal to luck. 

'Tis money makes the mare go 

But tlien. 
She has been known to balk and throw 

Some men. 
One can not vouch that she will trot 
To any safe or given spot. 

— ^Lurana W. Sheldon in New York 
"Times." 



Nuggets from the State Secretary. 




IGHT has already asserted 
her superiority and claims 
the greater part of the 24 
hours, bringing to the 
farmer his opportunity for 
intellectual recreation and improve- 
ment. Between the autumn and the 
vernal equinoxes no farmer does 
himself justice nor fully improves his 
opportunity who does not spend at 
least one hour a day in reading and 
thinking upon something else than 
what is found in the local newspaper 
or his favorite political sheet. 

The farmer who does this and goes 
to church on Sunday and to a live 
Grange meeting once a week or at 
least once in two weeks will be a 
progressive and almost certainly a 
Buccessful farmer. Did farmers gen- 
erally do it, they would so assert 
themselves that they would receive 
due recognition and secure for 
themselves their share of public 

honors and general wealth. 
* * • 

At the recent meeting of the Ameri- 
can Street Railway Association, Pres- 
ident Ely sounded the alarm at the 
great and rapidly growing sentiment 
throughout the country in favor of 
municipal and public ownership of 
public service corporations, declaring 
that unless the corporations became 
more active in their opposition they 
would be swept away and their prop- 
erties would become the property of 
the people. He asserts, and was 
cheered by the 800 delegates i)resent, 
that under our present form of gov- 
ernment municipal ownership cannot 
succes^sfully operate street railways. 
He follows the very common practice 
In these days of denouncing all, who 
do not think that existing conditions 
and systems are perfect, as dema- 
gogues. 

Just why the government could not 
run the railroads he does not say. 
Why the government could not em- 
ploy the same men to do the work 
that now do it is not apparent. 
Whether or not the administration 
would be efficient and the work faith- 
fully done would depend altogether 
on public sentiment as expressed at 
the polls. If the people in town 



would give more unbiased thought to 
public affairs and the people in the 
country would vote less for party and 
more for principle the public servant 
would be more impressed that hon- 
esty is the best policy. It is hardly 
necessary to say that the corporations 
themselves do not seem to be entirely 
free from graft. Nor need it be ad- 
ded that the people finally pay all 
the steals. 

Government ownership is coming, 
fellow farmer, and that yo'a and I 
may measure up to our responsibility 
in this wider stretch of public power 
we must do our share of thinking and 
see to it that our influence goes to 
the right side. This we will do effec- 
tually only through organization. 

" * * * 

The other day, two or three farm- 
ers were heard talking together and 
complaining about a local merchant 
who was buying apples and potatoes 
and retailing thpm to local consum- 
ers. The complaint was that he paid 
less than the conditions would war- 
rant and sold them for less than the 
consumers, who are for the most part 
employees of the railroad.could afford 
to pay for them. Thus discriminating 
against the farmer and in favor of 
the wage earner. At the same time 
they complained that it was next to 
impossible to hire a man to do a 
day's work on tihe farm. It was hint- 
ed to them that with the power in 
their own hands they have no rea- 
son to complain. Did these men and 
their neighbors get together in a 
Grange meeting every week and keep 
themselves posted on crop and mar- 
ket conditions throughout the coun- 
try, they would know exactly what 
the merchant could afford to pay 
them for their products and they 
could easily agree not to let him have 
them for less. 

Men work for the corporations 
rather than for the farmers because 
the former can pay better wages than 
the latter. It might be worth while 
for the Granges to discuss the ques- 
tion why those who transport commo- 
dities can pay better wages than those 
who produce them. 



lO 



^egmhUve ^animittee ^e^Hvtmmt 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 



THE new Township Road 
Law was passed by the 
last Legislature and was 
signed by ±bje Governor on 
the 12th of April, 1905. 
Thig new road law was published in 
full in the April number of the 
Grange News, to which the reader is 
referred. But in order to get ready 
for the new law, we give a short syn- 
opsis and a few comments and ex- 
planations. 

Section 1 of the Act provides that 
Townships of the second class, elect 
at the next February election a Boafd 
of three Road Supervisors, one for 
one year, one fpr two years and one 
for three years. Nearly all the town- 
ships in the Slate come under this 
second class. Those of the first class 
are governed somewhat like a Bor- 
ough and must have a population of 
300 to the square mile. 

The second section provides for the 
organization of the Board which shall 
have the same rights about laying tlie 
tax as the present system provides; 
but, in addition, every taxable shall 
be assessed one dollar in addition 
to the millage tax. This section also 
provides "than any township may, by 
a majority vote of the electors there- 
of, at the February municipal election, 
after 30 days' notice thereof change 
the system of taxation for working 
the public roads." A petition must 
be handed to the Court — signed by at 
least twenty-five taxpayers of the 
township. If the vote carries for a 
cash tax the State will furnish fifteen 
per cent, of the amount raised in 
cash, which, of course, will be paid 
the year after, just as the school ap- 
propriation is paid. This is a very 
important feature of the bill, and we 
are satisfied another Legislature will 
increase the amount to 40 or 50 per 
cent. We have, as a Grange, for many 
years protested against paying all the 
road tax and this is an opening to 
get the other parties to help. New 
York State pays 50 cents for every 
dollar the Townships raises in cash, 
and about one-half of her roads are 



under this system. Of course, the 
work plan will be the one in oper- 
ation if not changed as indicated and 
the same notices must be given as 
under the old law. 

Section 3 provides that the Board 
of Road Supervisors divide their 
townships into road districts of not 
less than 5 miles each. And shall ap- 
point the road masters who are to 
work on the roads and carry out the 
plans of the Board of Road Super- 
visors. This Board of Supervisors 
shall fix the wageg paid per hour to 
the. road masters and laborers. In 
addition, the Board will have the 
right to contract with any citizen in 
the township for the keeping in re- 
pair of not more than three miles of 
road for not a longer period than 
three years. 

We would suggest where only two 
supervisors have been elected under 
the old law and have not too much 
territory, that but two road masters 
be appointed for the reason that it 
will not disturb the present methods 
of doing business. Objections have 
been raised that the Board might ap- 
point too many road masters; we fail 
to see the force' of thig argument for 
the fact that they must work and 
are subject to discharge at any time. 

Section 4 provides for purchasing 
materials, etc., and permitting two- 
townships to. purchase these machines 
in partnership, and a method of dis- 
solving the partnership. 

Section 5 requires the treasurer to 
give bond and that he be a person 
outside the Board, pay out all monies 
on written orderg and be paid for his 
services an amount not to exceed 2 
per cent. 

Section 6 provides for the laying 
and payment of taxes, etc. 

The Board is to have monthly 
meetings, bu-t-are not to receive any 
pay. This is copied after the school 
law and is one of the best features 
of the new road law. The idea is that 
men who take an interest in road 
matters will be elected to the office, 
thug taking it out of the hands of 



II 



persons who want the offloe only for 
the pay there is in It. Some object- 
ions have been raised to this part 
of the law, but I am confident from 
the opinion of many leading farmers 
on this subject that this is a wise pro- 
Vision. The Board shall submit an- 
nual statements and make report to 
the State Highway Commissioner. 
The Board shall keep minutes of 
their proceedings and shall not be in- 
terested, directly or indirectly, in 
purchases, work done or contracts. 

They shall perform the same duties 
as imposed by existing laws on super- 
visors of roads, bridges and high- 
ways. Two shall constitute a quorum. 

The last section repeals all acts, or 
parts of acts, general or special, or 
local, inconsistent lierewith, or sup- 
plied hereby; except the acts of June 
12, 1893, act of June 26, 1895; 
act of April 28, 1899, and the 
act of May 24, 1901. These acts 
not repealed refer to some townships 
where large corporations pay the road 
tax and make the roads : The Flinn 
act, which allows counties to build 
roads; the act creating townships of 
the first class and an amendment to 
that act, respectively. 

Where townships at present are 
working under a special law having 
three supervisors whose terms are not 
all expired, no election shall take 
place for such office except as their 
terms expire. 

Upon the whole, we think this a 
good law, putting our roadg under 
a system and ultimately getting 
assistance in the building and repair- 
ing of our roads. We are sure if this 
law is taken hold of in the right 
spirit tliat in the course of ten years 
we will have better roads and less 
tax. There ig no politics in the law. 
It passed bo^h Houses unanimously. 
It has received the endorsement of "all 
people Interested in better roads and 
a better road system. We would ask 
that all newspapers publish the law 
in full for the information of the pub- 
lic. Those townships wishing to take 
advantage of the cash tax must apply 
to court at least 30 days before the 
•coming February election. 

In a later issue we will take up the 
management of a township under this 
■new law; or in other words, arrange 



a kind of program that can be fol- 
lowed or changed to suit conditions. 

W. T. CREASY. 



The Grange wants to "insure" ypur 
neighbor. To insure him to be a 
better citizen. Of course it can also 
insure his life and his buildings and 
insure better conditions for his whole 
family. You help by soliciting him 
to join. Don't forget it. Ask the wife 
to join, too. The Grange Insures both. 



Liability of Auto Drivers. 

Automobilists are liable under the 
law for damages which may result 
from runaways caused by horses be- 
coming frightened at their machines. 
So declares the Indiana Supreme 
Court. A case appealed to that tri- 
bunal was decided a few days ago and 
judgment of the lower court awarding 
damages to a man who had been In- 
jured in- a runaway wag affirmed. 
This is the way the court puts it, and 
it is interesting to automobilists gen- 
erally, because the courts of one State 
are governed by decisions of the 
higher courts of other States : 

"It cannot be said as a matter of 
law that appellants were guilty of 
negligence for using an automobile In 
a public highway. The law does not 
denounce motor carriages, as such, on 
the public ways. For as long as they 
are constructed and propelled in a 
manner consistent with the use of the 
highways and are calculated to sub- 
serve the public as a beneficial means 
of transportation with reasonable 
safety to travelers by ordinary modes 
they have an equal right with other 
vehicles In common use to occupy the 
streets and roads. Because novel and 
unusual In appearance and for reason 
likely to frighten horses unaccustom- 
ed to see them is no reason for pro- 
hibiting their use. But appellants, in 
operating on the highway a novel 
wheeled conveyance of uncommon ap- 
pearance and noise owed to the plain- 
tiff and other travelers the duty to 
carefully control and drlve"^ the same 
alon'^ so as to avoid causing needless 
Injury. This duty required appellants 
to take Into account the character of 
their machine, its general appearance, 
the loud pufllng noise sent forth while 
going, its new use in the vicljnity and 
Its tendency to frighten horses. When 
the defendants saw that plaintiff's 
horse had become frightened at the 
rapid approach of the strange, noisy 
carriage, and that the plaintlfC was 
in danger, which was reasonably 
certain to increase by the nearer ap- 
proach of the motor, and from which 



12 



it was plain he could not extricate 
himself except by defendant stopping 
or slowing down jjntil plaintiff could 
reaoh the cross street, it was the 
highest moral, as well as legal, duty 
of the defendants to stop and remove 
the plaintiff's peril." — Ex. 



Tioga County Pomona No. 30, rec- 
ommended for appointment as State 
Deputies for the County for 1906 : 
E. B. Dorsett, No. 1009; J. M. .Sea- 
man, No. 1088; J. L. Hager, No. 918; 
Mrs. Stella Pratt, No. 913;; Jerry 
Desmond, No. 1056. 

Cambria County Pomona, No. 51, 
recommends James Parabaugh, Brad- 
ley Grange, No./ 1126; John Wright, 
No. 1119. The/ State Master has »ecit 
commissions to the above. 
L 



A New Wrinkle of the oleo people 
is to sprinkle a few short hairs in 
their products so as to make the con- 
sumer think that this is butter sure 
enough. Their whole business Is 
based on fraud and deceptions from 
beginning to end. 



you know what you got for that 
produce you sold. Let's see ! How 
much did you have in it ? I would 
just like to know whether there is 
any money in keeping at that line, 
that's all. I suppose you know. "To 
calculate Intelligently on probabil- 
ities" is, you remember, Grange prin- 
ciples. 

The hardest worked farmer is the 
good woman at the head of the farm 
household. Do you appreciate her at 
her full value. Do you provide labor- 
saying appliances for her with the 
same solicitude as for yourself ? 



The Granges are booming on all 
aides. Large classes of candidates 
are being initiated. Exercises are be- 
ing made attractive. Business and 
pleasure are combined in the meet- 
ings. The Patrons have the con- 
sciousness of belonging to 'an order- 
that commands the respectful atten- 
tion of the nation. They begin to un- 
derstand the immense power that 
could be exerted by a farmer organi- 
zation that, embracing the maj^orlty 
of the farm population of the coun- 



try, and risiing above all mere sec- 
tionalism and partisanship, would de- 
mand of the national and state gov- 
ernments the same rights and privi- 
leges for the soil tillers that are given 
without question to other citizens. 
Keep the Grange growing and mov- 
ing. It is already a power in the 
land, and it may be and will be, made 
indetfinitely more powerful than ft 
now is. It educates and elevates the 
rural community It relieves the 
"isolation" of the country. It Is the 
school, the club, the theatre, the so- 
cial college of the rural people. It 
develops the social side of the farm 
community. In it each member can 
invest the best that is in him, with the 
certainty that he will receive his in- 
vestment back with large interest, 
with an "earned increment." No 
other one thing visible in the rural 
firmament offers or promises so 
much for farmers In the future as 
does the Grange. Be a Granger. 
Dive Grangerism. Practice Grange 
tenets. Then you will have reason to 
be glad that you are a farmer. 

— N. T. Farmer. 



n 



WISHING. 

Do you wish the world were better 7 

Let me tell you what to do : 
Set a watch upon your actions — 

Keep them always straight and true. 
Rid your mind of selfish motives; 

Let your thoughts be clean and high. 
You can make a little Eden 

Of the sphere you occupy. 

Do you wish the world were happy 7 

Well, suppose y*u make a start, 
By accumulating wisdom 

In the scrap book of ytfur heart. 
Do not waste one page on folly — 

Live to learn and leam to live. 
If you want to give men knowledge 

You must get it ere you give. 

Do you wish thie world were happy 7 

Then remember day by day 
Just to scatter seeds of kindness 

As you pass along the way. 
For the pleasures of the manly 

May be oft-times traced to one 
As the hand that plants an acorn 

Shelters armies from tn6 sun. 

—Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



National Grange, Atlantic City, Nov. 
15-25; State Grange, Sunbury, Dec. 
11-16. "See you there." 



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£ COLLEGE 

E, PEMK* 



%xm^t Jtetr^ 







gecemliet:^ 1905 



Officers of tHe Pennsylvania State Grange 

Master, W. F. HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
Overseer.pON. A. C. BARRETT, NewMilford, Susquehanna Co. 
Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 
Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Co. 
Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, GoshenviUe, Chester Co. 
Chaplain,^ REV. J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 
Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 
Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 
Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 
Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 
Flora, MRS. J. S. Dale, State College, Centre Co. 
Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHER, Lincoln University, Chester Co. 
L. A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, Millvillage, Erie Co. 



S^xecutive Contmittee . 

I. FRANK;CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 

G. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



Finance Committee 

D. B. McWILLIAMS, Burnham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

J OHN T. P ATTON, Warriors Mark, Hnntingdon Co. 



I^egislative Committee 

W. ¥. HILL. Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co. 
E. B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



Secretary Wilson or Asst. Secretary Hayes, Dept. of Ag(ri- 
culture. Washington. D. C, is expected to address the State 
Grange at Sunbury during the week of Dec. 12. 







VOL, IL No. 5 



DECEMBER, J905 



25 Cents per Year. 
5 Cents per Copv 



w. F. hilt:., 

BditoR. ' 
G. W^. OSTER, W. T. CREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. Editor I^egislative Committee Departmect 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered August 9, 1904, at Chambersburg,' Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



KI3ITORIAL. 




Election and Installation of Officers 
in Subordinate Granges. 

iHE Constitution of the 
Penn'a. State Grange in 
Article III Sec. 2, says: 

"The Subordinate 
Granges shall elect their 
officers annually at the last regular 
meeting in each year." 

This language is very clear and is 
the law for our State. Granges that 

have been established during the year 
are also to elect at the last regular 
meeting in December. It is custom- 
ary to conduct all Grange elections 
without nominations. Every patron 
in good and regular standing is privi- 
leged to participp^te in the selection ol 
the ofHcers in the Grange pf which he 

is a member, writing upon a blank 
ballot the name of the member he 
prefers for the position that is being 
filled. A majority of all the votes 
polled shall be necessary to constitute 
a choice. 

When the election is over the pres- 
ent secretary (for year 1905) should 
at once send to the State Secretary, 
Bro. J. T. Ailman, Thompsontown, 
Pa., the name and correct address of 
the elected Master,^ Lecturer and Sec- 
retary. 

As the State Secretary needs these 
names and addresses early, kindly 
send at once, without waiting for in- 
stallation or a later request. 



Thi^ Constitution provides for the' 
installation at the first meeting in the 
following month, January. For differ- 
ent reasons it is desirable that the 
installation shall take place as soon 
as practicable after the election. It 
is fitting also that Granges observe 
the installation occasion by having 
something a little extra, in the line of 
music and literary exercises . Even a 
feast is not objectionaljle to the most 
of us hungry mortals. It is well to in- 
vite the Deputy, some past or present 
State Grange OfRcer to install your 
officers. If in the economy of his 
plan he can not be present at your 
regular me.etirLg the installation may 
take place at a special meeting later. 
It may be public if desired. In fhis 
latter event aim to have everything, 
planned to go off well and it might 
have a good effect if spe<;ial invita- 
tions to be present were sent to cer- 
tain persons outside the order wha 
would make desirable members. 



Bro. Oster writes that Bro. Joe P. 
Imler, a member of his Grange, was 
elected Sheriff of Bedford County at 
the recent election by a handsome ma- 
jority. Bro. Imler is a whole soul 
genial good fellow and will make a 
good officer. 



Grange Birthday Dec. 4. 
are we? 



How old 



The Election of Officers. 

It is our "bounden duty" to begin 
to look about, carefully, for those who 

can and will make good officers for 
the ensuing year. It is not wise to 
elect to office a new member, who 
has not been tested by some labor. 

Never elect any one to office just as a 
compliment, or as a recognition of tal- 
ent or of social popularity. An officer 
is needed to do some special work, 
and, while it is an honor to be chosen 
for any of our positions, the only way 

In which a member can express prop- 
er gratitude is by rendering the best 
service in his or her power. To hold 
office anywhere, with or without sal- 
ary, is the test of one's character. Se- 
lect for the principal places in the 
Grange, those members who have 
proved their ability and fidelity; those 
who attend regularly and who have 
time to give to the duties required of 
them. 

While we do not make nominations 
in the Grange, but use the ballot, it 
is right to talk over, out of session, 
this matter of election of officers, 
and, it would save much waste of 
time. Especial care must be exer- 
cised in the selection of master, lec- 
turer and secretary. No true Patron 
of Husbandry should 'shirk the duty 
of electing officers, and be absent at 
the December meeting. Vote your 
own choice first, and then try.in a fra- 
ternal spirit, to so vote as to secure 

good officers for your Grange, and to 
accept without comment, the majority 
rule. Neither personal ambition nor 
prejudice should have place at our 
elections. — Oregon Bulletin. 



Erie Co., Pa., Pomona Xotioe. 

Erie County Pomona Grange will 
meet with Corry Grange No. 55, Dec. 
6th and 7th. Grange will open Wed- 
nesday at 10:30, a. m., in Fourth De- 
gree. Wednesday afternoon will be 
open session to which every o^e is in- 
vited. Wednesday evening, Fifth De- 
gree session, banquet of Pomona, elec- 
tion and installation of officers. 
Thursday's meetings will be held in 
the Fourth Degree, and be devoted to 
the discussion of questions, music and 
recitations. 



REWARti^t). ? 

I cooked the breakfast, fixed with cafe 
Lunch baskets for three lassies fair, 
I aired the beds, each room swept out 
And dusted everywhere about. 

I washed the dishes, darned apd sewed 
Of garments wee an endless load; 
Prepared the dinner, bread did bake, 
And for the children made a cake. 

Aye, on and on; so much to do, 
A housewife never gets all through; 
That night I felt so tired that I 
Somehow unconsciously did sigh. 

An instant, and upon my knee 
Had jumped my baby, not yet three; 
I heard in accents lisping low, 
"Sweet Muvver, I do love oo so." 

That mine was not a rose-wreathed lot, 
That I .was tired, I quite forgot; 
I was so happy, happy, that 
Far, far. into the night I sat. 

His little arms around me pressed, 
His sunny head against my breast. 
I, princess, Queen of Love and Joy, 
The mother of my blue-eyed boy. 
'^ — Kathleen Kavanaugh. 



POMONA. 

In olden times the ancients had a 
god and goddess for the earth, the 
sky, rivers, mountains, trees, fruits, 
flowers and grain. To some beautiful 
temples were erected, elaborate cere- 
monies conducted at different seasons 
of the year and the stories and leg- 
ends of those early days are still a;,** 
part of our literature, and hold place 
in our speech and lives. 

The Grange, to impress some of its 
important truths, seeking to develop 
a happier, more prosperiou farm life; 
to develop a better and higher i^aan- 
hood and womanhood, uses in its 
forms and ceremonies these olden 
symbols. We have a Ceres, Pomona 
and Flora. In the ages past, Pomona 
was worshiped as the Goddess of 
Fruits, hence our names, Pomology, 
Pomolo, Pomegranate, etc., etc., and 
she in all our Grange work repre- 
sents fruit. Her emblem is the 
branch laden with fruit blossoms; her 
encouragiing word is always "Hope." 
"Let the fruit blossoms be to you 
an emblem of hope. When you see 
the blossoms open in the early sunq- 
mer, Hope is there for the luscious 
fruit. That life may be profitable, 
laden with good fruits,let all endeavor 



that youth may be studious and vir- 
tuous, replete with the blossoms of 
observation and study — the promise 
of future wisdom and usefulness." 

Pomona was one of the Wood 
Nymphs, and no one excelled her in 
love of the gardens and the culture 
of fruit. She' cared not so much for 
forests and rivers, but loved the cul- 
tivated country and trees that bear 
delicious fruit. Her right hand bore 
for its • weapon not a javelin, but a 
pruning knife. Armed with this she 
busied herself at one time to repress 
the luxuriant growths, and curtail the 
branches that straggled out of place; 
at another,- to split the twig and insert 
therein a graft, making the branch 
adopt a nursling not its own. She 
took care, too, that her favorite should 
not suffer from drought, and led 
streams of water by them that the 
thirsty roots might drink. This occu- 
pation was her pursuit. One of the 
poets says : 

"Bear me Pomona, to thy citron groves, 
To where the lemon and the piercing lime 
With the deep orange glowing thru the 

green, 
Their lighter glories blend. Let me re- 

, cline 
Beneath the spreading tamarind that 

shakes, 
Fanned by the breeze, its fever-cooling 

fruit." 

Pomona had many lovers and for a 
long time resisted all comers, so well 
did she love her trees and vines. Ver- 
tuinnus loved her best, and came to 
her in all sorts of disguises, once as 
an old woman giving advice, sitting 
down on a bank looking up at the 
branches laden with fruit which hung 
over her. Opposite was an elm en- 
twined with a vine loaded with 
swelling grapes. She praised the 
tree and its associClte vine equally. 
"But," said she, "if the tree stood 
alone, and had no vine clinging to 
it, it would have nothing to attract 
or. offer us, but useless leaves. And 
equally the vine, if it were not twined 
around the elm, would lie prostrate 
on the ground. Why will you not 
take a lesson from the tree and the 
vine and consent to accept a lover ? 
I wish you would, if you will let an 
old woman advise you, dismiss all the 
rest and accept Vertumnus. I know 



him as well as he knows himself. Nor 
is he like too many of the lovers now- 
a-days, who love any one they hap- 
pen to see; he loves you, and you only. 
Take pity on him. Remember the gods 
punish cruelty, and Venus hates a 
hard heart." Then, dropping his dis- 
guise, he stood before her a comely 
youth. He would have renewed his 
entreaties, but there was no need; his 
arguments and the sight of his true 
form prevailed, and the Pomona no 
longer resisted, but owned her love 
for him. 

Let us heed the teachings of the 
Grange and strive to nurture Hope. 
— American Grange Bulletin. 



All the money sent Penn'a Grange 
News goes to help the State Grange 
to make the magazine better. No 
individual gets a single penny for his 
work or trouble. 



JIIPPLES. 

Result is simply a matter of desire. 

More smiles at home mean fewer 
smiles at the corner. 

Children are unvarnished imitations 
of their elders. ^ 

The world may owe you a living, 
but you'll starve trying t ' collect it. 

Fortune's wht el turns tiv the mark 
who pushes. 

Do the right thing in the right 
way at the right time, or don't do it. 

Our train of thought too often runs 
into an open switch. 

Xo man can put himself in cold 
storage and keep fresh. 

Character and T-eputation are very 
different sometimes. Reputation 
melts in the sun of publicity; charac- 
ter grows stronger. 



Bedford County Pomona Grange 
meets Dec. 6 in Osterburg Grange 
Hall. One of the topics for discussion 
is "Would it be w<se to organize a 
Bank in this county under Grange 
iniative? If so, where should it be 
located? 



Suggestive Program for State Grange Meeting. 



Tuesday, December 12, 10:30 a. m. 

iCalled to order; receiving credentials 
and opening Grange. 11 a. m., Grange 
to go into open session for the delivery 
of the annual address of the Worthy 
Master. The general public admitted at 
this hour. 

Tuesday, p. m. 

Reports of other officers; appointments 
of committees; reception of resolutions. 

Tuesday evening. 

A public reception to the officers and 
delegates of the Penn'a. State Grange 
by the c^y of Sunbury and Pomona 
Grange No. 31. 

"Wednesday, a. m. - 

General discussion and addresses. 

Wednesday, p. m. 

Reports of Executiv^e Committee and of 
T^egislative Committee. Introduction of 
' further resolutions, addresses, discus- 
sions, etc. 

Wednesday evening. 

Session will be held in the Sixth De- 
gree, when the beautiful Degree of Flora 
will be conferred on all qualified appli- 



cants, to be followed by an illustrated 
lecture upon grafting chestnuts, their 
cultivation and adaptaoillty to Penn'a. 
conditions. 

'J'hursdaj^ A. M. 

Reports of committees, discussion of 
their reports and of resolutions. 

Thursday, p. m. 

The election of one member to serve 
three years upon the Executive Com- 
mittee; one member to serve three years 
upon the Finance Committee; reports of 
committees and discussion upon tlie same. 

Thursday evening. 

Final reports of all cammittees; ad- 
dress; closing in time to allow for a so- 
cial, literary and musical hour at the 
respective hotels. 

Friday, a. m. 

Payment of all bills, including R. R. 
fare of delegates by the Treasurer; com- 
pletion of unfinished business; final clos- 
ing of the Grange in full form. The 
closing ceremony of the State Grange 
is very ampressive and no one should 
miss it who can possibly be present. 



Bro.. O. H. Kelly at Sunbury. 

The following letter is self explanatory: 

"Dear Brother Hill :— 

As my trip to Atlantic City im- 
proved my health, my wife and daughters 
want me to accept your kind invitation 
to attend your State Grange; hence I 
am at your service. Will want to shake 
han(4.s with all your good Patrons and 
may make a short speech. Please re- 
serve for me a warm room at the Hotel. 
Best wishes for a grand meeting. 
Fraternally, 

O. H. KELLY." 

So it will l)e seen that we may hope to 
greet this surviving founder of the Or- 
der at Sunbury week of Doc. 12th. This 
w.ill be a rare treat indeed, and is itself 
worth the effort of going to this session 
of the State Grange. 



The last meeting of the National Grange 
was attended by a goodly -nfumber of 
Penn'a Patrons. It did a large amount 
of good work which was generally re- 
ported by the press thruout the State. 
'Copies of the annual address of Brother 
Jones will be at the State Grange for 
distribution. 



Full of Meat. 

In this issue space ds given for an ad- 
dress delivered by Bro. John G. Mc- 
Henry, at the Pomona Grange Picnic last 
sumimer in his home county — 'Columbia. 

It is a very thoughtful production. 
After reading It, the reader will enjoy 



digesting it. His banking proposition 
has taken root already in Tioga County, 
where there has ))cen enough stock sub- 
scribed and they propose to have there a 
Grange National Bank. More about this 
move, ton. at Smlr^-^-. 



Officers elected at a meeting of York 
County Pomona No. 40, P. of H., held at 
Glenville, Pa., Nov. 11th, 1905, and duly 
installed : 

Master — Henry Wagnor, Hanover, Pa. 

Overseer — Ira D. Keller, Hanover, Pa. 

Lecturer — Hon. D. S. Dubs, Marburg, 
Pa. 

Steward— Daniel F. Bittinger, Hanover, 
Pa. 

Asst. • Steward — William S. Newcomer, 
Glen Rock, Pa. 

Chaplain — ^Prof. Daniel Eberly, Han- 
over, Pa. 

Treasurer — P. S. Bowman, esq., Han- 
over, Pa. 

Secretary — -C. A. Grote, Brodbecks, Pa. 

Gate Keeper — Wm. R. Rolubaugh, Glen 
Rock, Pa. 

Ceres — Alice C. Y. Keller, Hanover, Pa. 

Pomona — Martha E. Bowman, Hanover, 
Pa. 

Flora — Mabel Newcomer, Glen Rock, 
Pa. 

Lady Asst. Steward — Fannie Geiman, 
Hanover, Pa. 

Executive Committee. 

P. S. Bowman, Hanover, Pa. 
H. Oscar Lange, Hanover, Pa. 
Milton E. Bowman, Hanover, Pa. 
John Garman, Brodbecks, Pa. 
John W. Miller, Glenville,' Pa. 



CONDITIONS AND HOW TO BETTER THEM 



hi an Address delivered at a Grange Pic7iic, John G* Mc Henry 
of Columbia County, Reviews Problems and Suggests Remedies. 




FEEL, highly complimented to 
Ibe invited to address this 
(body of intelligent men and 
women of the Columbia Coun- 
ty farms. 

There is always a reason 
for a man's special likes and dislikes and 
sometimes those reasons are directly 
traceable to incidents which cariy iiim 
back to his boyhood days. One reason 
perhaps that causes me to feel so deeply 
the (Farmers' interests is due to the fact 
that I have served a full apprenticeship 
upon the farm. 

At the age of sixteen I was placed on 
my father's farm and made a full hand at 
all kinds of work until I was twenty years 
old. During this time, in my dally Inter- 
course with the farmer and his family, I 
learned to know him as a class. I learned 
to know something of his trials and some- 
thing of his pleasures, of his disappoint- 
ments and of his hopes. And so deep waji 
the impression made upon my young 
mind that it has not Qnly never become 
eradicated; but with advancing years 
comes an increasing respect and love for 
the farmer folk; a deeper desire in my 
heart to do what little may ever be in 'my 
power to advance their interests or ele- 
vate their condition. 

I think upon festive and social occa- 
sions of this kind that in some respect 
speeches are out of place and keeping 
with the time, and bearing this in mind, 
I will be as brief as possible and confine 
my remarks to the young men and women 
of the farms in particular and discuss, 

THE OPPORTUNITIES OF THE AMER- 
ICAN FARMER. 

It is not my purpose to tell you farmers 
who have had far more experience than 
I have ever had, how to grow greater 
crops; but I do want to tell you what I 
think you can and should do to secure a 
greater income from the crops which 
you do grow. 

To the man who is dissatisfied with his 
lot — always bemoaning his fate, always 
grumbling and finding fault with his fam- 
ily, never finding any good in anybody 
or anything — I have nothing to say, for 
his case Is a hopeless one. But to the 
man and woman who are striving with 
noble efforts to make the best of a hard 
situation, who (believe there Is some good 
Izx humanity, who are toravely looking for- 
ward with cheerful hopefulness to a 
brighter future, I hope to advance a few 
words of cheer and encouragement and 
most especially do I want to give some 



words of hope to the young men and 
women who by nature will soon be called 
to places of responsibility and trust upon 
the farm. 

Did you ever stop to think for a mo- 
ment, that the farmer is the hub around 
which the American Wheel of Commerce 
and Trade revolves ? Did it ever occur 
to you that if the Hub was removed or 
stopped that the wonderful fabric of this 
great Commercial Wheel would collapse 
absolutely ? Did you ever think of the 
immense good you are to humanity ? 
That the balance of the Commercial 
World can stop or go on as it pleases and 
it is of little moment to you, so far as 
your living goes; but should your work 
of production cease; imagine for a mo- 
ment the result of all the farmers in the 
country saying : we have enough provis- 
ions and supplies on hand to feed and 
clothe our families, so we won't raise 
any more grain for a year or two. Of 
what value, I ask you, would the wealth 
of Rockefeller avail against the tremen- 
dous cry for bread that would go up 
throughout the land. 

I would never want to see such a step 
taken, nor would I advise it even though 
your organization was complete through- 
out as I hope some day to see it; be- 
cause it would not provide the remedy 
for existing conditions. Your mission In 
life is to create and not destroy. 

The farmers' and laborers' interests are 
mutual. When I refer to laborers, I mean 
all classes of people who labor either 
with their hands or brains, because they 
are joint producers and working in part- 
nership with you. 

When we carry our memory back to the 
Colonial Period and remember that at 
that time the farmers and laborers were 
the real owners of all the wealth of this 
country; that the signers of the "Decla- 
ration of Independence" were all farmers, 
thus demonstrating that you had the con- 
trolling voice In your Government, and 
compare those times with financial and 
political conditions as they exist to-day; 
when we find that now one- eighth of our 
population is owning seven-eig'hts of the 
wealth of the country and Wall Street 
through its various ramifications owning 
and controlling this Government, It would 
appear that there Is something vitally 
wrong either with farming as an Industry, 
or the farmers themselves, or the condi- 
tions which surround the farms. 

Admitting this to be a fact, let us see 
If we eannot locate the cause and suggest 
a feasible remedy for Immediate applica- 
tion. 



THE REAL CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY. 

It is astonishing to me to hear of all 
this talk about Captains of Industry; wor- 
shiping at the shrine of "Gold," as idol- 
aters of old. Who are the Captains of In- 
dustry and the real producers of wealth ? 
The echoing answer comes to me from 
the breasts of all honest men, "The Amer- 
ican Farmer !" 

It is the product of his toil that puts 
every wheel of every industry in motion. 
It is the product of his labor that has 
caused the American Continent to be en- 
tertwined with the greatest net work of 
railroads that any country in the world 
has ever witnessed. It is the product of 
his toil that keeps the mighty fleets of 
commercial going craft upon our ocean 
and like the law of life, the law and foun- 
dation of commerce begins and ends with 
the farmer. 

When the world first began, man's 
earliest struggle was for existence, for 
his food to eat and his raiment to wear, 
during all these years this same struggle 
continues; not with the abatement which 
should come with modern conditions, but 
with a seemingly added fierceness and 
intensity which can only come from ab- 
normal conditions. After all is said and 
done, we are all working for a living and 
at the final end it is all we get and we 
have to go to theffartner to get it. When 
the last trumpetV call is sounded, the 
Rockefellers, the Morgans and the Car- 
negies with all their millions, can only 
say like you and I, we have lived. 

But have they paid the farmer who fed 
them a fair price? If so, why is it that 
to-day farming seems a greater struggle 
than ever before and is the farmer him- 
self entirely free from blame for this con- 
dition? Let us hold up the glass and 
look not only rival conditions, but our 
own situation squarely in the face. 

Where does wealth begin. Let us go 
back to the beginning and trace it. As 
time went on it was found necessary for 
men to sepanate their labor into differ- 
ent classes. That is, while some tilled 
the soil others made shoes, while others 
weaved clothing, and still others devoted 
their time to becoming skillful in the 
various crafts. For a time they all lived 
as one people and divided the results of 
their toil equally. The next financial 
step was exchange of commodities, for 
instance the man who made a pair of 
moccasins or shoes would exchange them 
for so much wheat or corn. Later on 
money was devised and a basis of values 
fixed. 

For some years after the establishment 
of a imoney value all men were upon an 
equal footing and before a man could re- 
ceive a dollar he must first give its 
equivalent in value either In labor or the 
products of his labor. For a time the 
farmer thrived and made more money 
than any other class, because in addi- 
tion to the labor of his own hands, the 
earth, the sun, and the rain were all 
handmaidens helping him in his work 
of production and because of this help 



It was but natural that he should create 
and contribute more of real value to the 
world in general than any other class of 
workmen, but for the past half-century 
not withstanding the fact that he has 
broader acres, improved machinery, pro- 
ducing his crops at a less cost, a broader 
market, increiised consumption keeping 
pace with increased production, still pro- 
ducing the greater share of the wealth 
of this nation, yet his prosperity has not 
been keeping pace with the prosperity 
along other lines. 

In fact he has not even been holding 
his own and if the values of farm land 
as compared with other properties are a 
fair basis of comparison, the farmer of 
the United States is neither going ahead 
nor standing still, but is steadily going 
backward in this great race for money. 
It is a common law of evolution that 
neither an individual, a corporation, a 
State, nor a nation can stand still. The 
natural law of progress is as fixed as 
the laws of gravity and drives us either 
forward or backward, according to our 
ambition, our energy and our abilities. 
Is the American farmer keeping up with 
the procession, or is he falling behind, 
and why? 

HOW FICTITIOUS VALUES ARE 

CREATED AND MAINTAINED. 

After the money came into use, the 
gambling instinct which seems inherent 
in all men to a greater or less degree 
sprang into toeing as though touched 
with a magic wand. Vast financial 
schemes that were previously impossible 
and unheard of blossomed over night into 
the full bloom of a* mushroom growth. 
Each scheme having for its prime object 
the creation of fictitious and commercial 
values to exchange with the farmer and 
laborer for their real and honest values 
of wheat and labor. 

For the benflt of my younger hearers I 
will explain how fictitious values are 
created and maintained. 

The shoemaker says, I will build a 
factory to make your shoes, and he goes 
to his banker and lays his plans before 
him. The first question the banker asks 
is, "How much is there in it for me?" 
The shoemaker needs fifty thousand dol- 
lars to build his plant; the banker says 
all right. I will advance you the money 
to build your plant upon these conditions, 
you will give me a first mortgage against 
the property of one hundred thousand 
dollars, we will call this mortgage a 
bond issue and I will take the bonds at 
fifty cents on the dollar. And as I must 
have something for my trouble, I will 
sell them to my friends and clients for 
one hundred cents on the dollar, thus 
the banker has in this one transaction 
and by this magical process converted 
fifty cents of actual value Into a dollar 
of commercial value. But he is not 
through yet, he says to the shoemaker 
another condition of this transaction is, 
you must issue shares of stock for twice 
the amount of your bond issue or two 



I 



i 



hundred thousand dollars isnd I want ono- 
half of that stock. Now you may think 
that all this does not concern you, that 
it is a matter between the shoemaker and 
his banker. 

Never lose sight of this fundamental 
principal, that the consumer — the user — 
Is the man who always pays the manu- 
facturing cost and the profit upon every 
article sold. Let us see how this affects— 
you; the factory is built and started)^ 
now the shoemaker ^must pay interest 
upon his bonded indebtedness of one 
hundred thousand dollars, in addition to 
this he must pay interest in the form of 
dividends upon his capital stock of two 
hundred thousand dollars, thus you see 
the wonderful creation of value, where 
the fifty thousand dollar investment has 
grown over night to a com^mercial value 
six times as great, or three hundred 
thousand dollars. 

In order to pay all these interest 
charges, officers' salaries, etc., it is nec- 
essary for the shoemaker to charge a 
greater price for his shoes. Thus, where 
a farmer or laboring man once paid $1.50 
for a pair of shoes under the old way and 
under the old law of honest exchange of 
values, he is now paying two and two 
and a half dollars for the same pair of 
shoes. 

THE FORMATION OF A TRUST. 

ler^ of this sort and the shoemaker finds 
that there are other shoemakers playing 
the same game and competition in the 
sale of his shoes has not only reduced 
his. price, but made it hard for him to 
control his old trade, so he says to his 
stockholders, let us buy up all the shoe- 
making plants in the coynlry so that no 
one will sell shoes cheaper than we do. 
Yes, they say, that might be all right, but 
some other fellow will still go on fcuilding 
factories and will buy hides and make 
shoes and continue to give us the same 
trouble. All rig'ht, we have a plan to 
meet that condition, we will not only 
own and control all plants, but we will 
form a pool to buy and control al the 
hides and raw material from which shoes 
are made, so the great leather trust is 
finally born. 

THE CREATION OF A HIGH PRO- 
TECTIVE TARIFF. 

They found after its first creation that 
there was another contingency which 
they hadn't counted upon, that other 
countries were dressing hides and were 
wlllin'g tx> sell them to the American peo- 
ple for less than the Trust prices, so the 
Trust appeals to Congress and it; has one 
of the most' seductive appeals in the 
world, and demands that a tax be im- 
posed upon all importation of hides. Thus 
we find all the machinery completed 
■with the aid of our own Government 
which we have created, to make a per- 
fect 'monopoly of an article that must be 
used by every man, woman and child. 
The farmer now finds that if he must 



buy a pair of shoes, he must help pay the 
interest on a lot of watered stock and 
bonds, he must pay the high salaries of 
these Trust officials v/ho nearly all re- 
ceive greater salaries than the- President 
of the United States, and where a pair 
of shoes once cost him $1.50, he now pays 
two and two and a half dollars for the 
same shoes. 

If he buys one pair of shoes a year he 
is paying one dollar to the Trust that 
should rightfully go into his own private 
bank account, if he buys ten pairs of 
shoes for his family, he is being robbed of 
ton dollars which rightfully belongs to 
his wife and children. 

The comparison which I have endeav- 
ored to briefly draw in reference to shoes 
applies to every article the farmer and 
mechanic buys, from the matches with 
which he lights his morning fire, to the 
reaper that harvests his wheat. 

Every housewife here knows that dur- 
ing the canning season of every year 
sugar is advanced from a half to a full 
cent per pound. This seems a trifling 
matter, but it means in the aggregate, 
millions of profit to the Sugar Trust, and 
enables them to pay an unlawful profit 
upon their fictitious stock. 

THE PURCHASING POWER OF THE 
FARMER'S DOLLAR DECREASING. 

So you see the dollar which you have 
received for your wheat is used to buy 
so many fictitious values, that its use- 
fulness to you and its real purchasing 
value to you is growing less each year 
and under the present order of things 
your capacity for increasing the number 
of dollars you receive is limited. 

Here we find the man who is the real 
producer of wealth between two fires, 
in no instance is he permitted to name 
his own price, neither for that which he 
buys, nor for that which he sells. He 
is obliged by the force of necessity to ac- 
cept the price that the merchant and 
miller offers hini for his produce and is 
compelled to pay the price demanded by 
the merchant and manufacturer for the 
goods he must^buy. Thus we see under 
this monopolistic control, the farmer's 
earning capacity growing less under this 
■ inverse ratio of proportion. The Trust 
compels him to take a little less for what 
he has to sell and keeps charging him a 
little more each year for what he must 
buy until they have reached the limit of 
human endurance. 

Therefore, I claim the deal is not a fair 
one; that the farmer who is the original 
and true distributor of wealth is not get- 
ting his share; and as a house cannot 
rise above the height for which its foun- 
dation has been designed, neither can 
the general' prosperity of our people as 
a whole rise to its greatest level until 
there is a general re-adjustment of the 
foundation structure of values, and that 
foundation begins a'bsolutely with the 
farmer and laborers of all classes and 
the dollars which they create. 



10 



WALL STREET. 

You are all of course familiar with th(f 
term Wall Street, and know what it 
stands for. It is nothing- more or less 
than a great gambling- institution and is 
doing- more to undermine the indviidual- 
ity of the American people, doing more 
to aid in the concentration of wealth in- 
to the hands of a few, robbing the many, 
than all other agencies combined. 

Young men; you who are now standing 
upon the threshold between youth and 
manhood, with an eager ambition to take 
up life's duties and with an earnestness 
that bespeaks a gentle mother's careful 
training, let me add a word of warning 
to her daily prayers — Never gamble in 
any form or m;inner. 

Of all the vices it is one of the worst 
and places you at once under the ban of 
suspicion. And you lose not only your 
money, but what is of vastly more im- 
portance to you, the confidence of your 
friends. 

Wall Street is where the watered bonds 
and stocks of these wonderful Trust 
Organizations are exchanged for the peo- 
ple's money. Think of the irony of it, 
they lirst throttle all competition, crush 
the small manufacturer and dealer, and 
then not only make the people put up 
more of their hard earned money to buy 
their products, but actually get the 
money from the people to build and equip 
their plants. 

In this respect the banks and trust 
companies of the United States and the 
United States Government are to a great 
extern in this conspiracy against the 
common people, in the application of 
cunningly devised methods called 

MODERN FINANCE. 

In conversation with a prominent Wall 
Street operator he described the opera- 
tions of Wall Street to me in the follow- 
ing language. He says: "Throw a 
twenty dollar gold piece into the gutter 
and a hundred' brokers will fight for it, 
one will get it; now what happens, at 
night you will fln^ those ninety-nine 
brokers lying awake planning each to 
get the twenty dollars from the other 
and for himself. " 

The American farmer is to-day stand- 
ing in the very center of this mad money- 
getting life and character-killing arena. 
Go into any broker's office and read the 
little tape that comes over the wire and 
see the grave concern that is expressed 
concerning the crop reports. Read the 
financial columns of the city papers and 
note the crop reports. What does this 
mean ? 

My friends, it means that you are the 
fellows with the twenty dollar gold pieces 
and that the hundreds of thousands of 
brokers and so-called finajnciers are lay- 
ing awake nights planning schemes to 
get it away from you and your family. 
What does it mean? Why it means that 
the figures representing the value of your 
crops are positively startling in their im- 
mensity. 



Last year's corn crop alone was two 
and a half billion ^bushels, valued at forty 
cents per bushel, makes the wonderful 
value of a billion dollars. 

An annual total for all crops and pro- 
duce, including live stock, for the year 
1904, makes the astonishing total of be- 
tween three and four billions of dollars, 
and the reports from this year's harvest 
promisi; to exceed by large figures the 
general average for the past ten years. 

Can you not see what this enormous 
wealth means? Can you not see why the 
whole world waits anxiously the final 
report of the last harvest field? If the 
crops are good it means that the farmer 
has plenty and that he immediately toe- 
gins to spend his money; he keeps fac- 
tories and millions of employees busy 
supplying his wants. The miners are 
kept busy supplying the heat and fuel 
that this demand has created. If the 
crops are good it means that the horde 
of Wall Street gamblers have so much 
more to play on. 

It means that the Rockefellers can sell 
another hundred million dollars worth of 
oil. It means that the railroads of the 
Goulds and Vanderbilts are busy night 
and day carrying freight and showing 
enormous profits for their stockholders'. 

It means that the ^mighty Steel Trust 
can keep their mills going and pay their 
hundreds of thousands of employees fair 
wages. But what if the crops are poor, 
or the price below a living profit to the 
farmer? It follows as surely as tihe night 
follows the day, that when the farmer 
has no money, nobody else has any. And 
when the farmer is prosperous he sheds 
his prosperity throughout all humanity, 
and like the rays of the morning sun, It 
penetrates and carries its life giving 
warmth throughout all classes of society. 

If it is true that the farmers and la- 
borers arc the real producers and the 
rightful and original owners of the real 
wealth of this country, and this fact 
seems undeniable, why then should they 
take second place anywhere for anybody. 

I tell you, men, it is your own fault if 
you do. After creating this dollar you 
should not be content with the first 
transaction, but should follow that dol- 
lar through its many changes and as It 
continues to grow and double and treble 
in value, you should get your s]tiare. Is 
it any wonder that your condition gets 
harder each year ? 

There was a time which I have already 
described when every man in the United 
States worked with 'his hands for a liv- 
ing. Now we find hundreds of thousands 
of imen trying to live with their 
brains. They have ceased to be real 
producers in a physical sense and have 
become drones in this great beehive of 
humanity. In this great clamor for a 
higher education we find thousands of 
our brightest young men entering our 
colleges with the idea that they are go- 
ing to make an easy living without work. 
My young friends get all the education 
you can, but get it with the idea that It 



f 



II 



is going to fit you to do more work and 
that work more intelligently. Get a col- 
lege education if you can, but if this is 
denied you, remember that some of our 
brightest statesmen and greatest finan- 
"ciers never saw the inside of a college. 

I would rather see a boy or girl filled 
with common sense and no education as 
Jt is so called, than to see them cnimmed 
with education and no common sense. 
Idleness should be viewed as a crime 
against society. 

Each year we find the number of farm 
workers growing less and the number of 
people standing around to be fed grow- 
ing more, and as these numbers increase 
in this inverse ratio, we find the non- 
producers less willing to pay the farmer 
a fair price for his investment and labor. 
They seemingly say to him, we are forced 
to buy your wheat because we must live; 
but v/e will get this dollar which we 
have just paid you for your wheat away 
from you so quick that the little time 
'you keep it does not interrupt our finan- 
cial plans. 

So after harvesting your crops and 
collecting this tremendous sum of money 
you turn right around and send it back 
to Wall Street through the depositories 
of your local banks and say to them, take 
it, we are afraid to irust ourselves to 
handle it. But you say, how can 
this state of things be remedied. 

THE REMEDY. 

When we talk about a remedy for the 
farming industry, I am reminded of the 
story of the East India vessel upon which 
the bubonic plague or cholera had got 
started and men were dying in great 
numbers. The surgeons would make a 
chalk mark at the head of each bunk 
containing a corpse; in going his rounds 
he placed his mark on a bunk whose oc- 
cupant raised a great cry and said be 
wasn't dead yet, when the surgeon re- 
plied : "Shut up, you fool, do you 
suppose you know more about it than I 
do. " 

So it is with the farmer, every time he 
raises 'his voice in protest an^d suggests 
a remedy, we hear the voice of Wall 
Street through the Government at Wash- 
ington, saying to us, "Shut up, we know 
what ails you better than you do." For 
years and years we have been deluded 
with political promises. 

Each four years our flagging hopes are 
renewed with pledges and each time we 
are unfailingly disappointed. 

The Government says wqflwill investi- 
gate. So investigators are appointed who 
have a faculty of always finding a su- 
preme Court decision or a Constitutional 
reason Why the Trusts cannot be de- 
stroyed. 

Take for instance the recent report of 
Garfield, who was appointed to investi- 
gate the Beef Trust. Time does not per- 
mit me here to give you a statement of 
•his figures, but the result of his report 
was, first, there was no Beef Trust. 
Second, that the large packing houses 



were hardly making expenses, and third, 
that the Beef Trust was accomplishing 
a real benefit to suffering humanity. 

He didn't t'ell us what is true, that the 
price of beef has advanced from sixteen 
cents for sirloin steak in 1900 to twenty- 
two per pound in 1905 in the average city 
market, and that a steer that was worth 
$46 in 1900, was worth $44, in 1902; $42, 
in 1903, and $41.50, in 1904. The actual 
figures show these results. As in the 
a^se of the shoe manufacturer the great 
combination of capital into what is com- 
monly called a Trust has enabled them 
to control absolutely the price of all raw 
material. Steadily forcing the price of 
raw material down and with correspond- 
ing certainty forcing the price of the 
finished article hig'her. 

Thus we see in every transaction In' 
which the Farmer and laborer is Interest- 
ed, a combination against him which is 
gradually lessening his earning capacity, 
by giving him less for what he has to 
sell and compelling him to pay more for 
what he is obliged to buy. 

Why should we be longer deceived ? 
We need no longer took for hope or help 
from this Government until you learn to 
join hands in a movement which has for 
iLis purpose a Government of the people, 
for the people and by the people. 

The politicians of all parties know full 
well that the Constitution of the United 
States gives to the capitalist the same 
privilege of spending his money as it ac- 
cords to you, and just so long as you are 
willing to rus'h into Wall Street and buy 
the watered stocks of these Trust cre- 
ations and continue to place your surplus 
earnings in th.e hands of insurance and 
trust companies for their use and manip- 
ulation, just so long will Trusts continue 
to thrive. regardless of any political 
party which may be in power, because 
the Government is powerless to prevent 
them by any present or past methods of 
procedure. 

The remedy, my friends, lies both with 
our Government and with ourselves. But 
before the common people can expect any 
help from their Government, they must 
win back the control which they once had 
in the days of Washingtoh and Lincoln. 
As to ourselves, let us see If we are doing 
what we can individually before we con- 
demn either the Government or the man 
behind the Trusts. 

The time is here for all men who toil to 
join hands for mutual protection. When 
any law or condition is created, that ben- 
efits the farmer; then the miner, the me- 
chanic, the laborer and all humanity are 
correspondingly benefitted, for we are all 
of one brotherhood. 

Brotherhood. 

The crest and crowning of all good, 
Life's final star, is Brotherhood; 
For it will ibring again to earth 
Her long-lost Poesy and Mirth; 
Will send new light on every face, 
A kingly power upon the race. 
And till It come, we men are slaves, 
And travel downward to the dust of 
graves. 



12 



Come, clear the way. then, clear the way; 
Blind creeds and kings have had their day. 
Break the dead branches from the path; 
Our hope is in the aftermath — 
Our hope is in h'croic men. 
Star-led to build thQ world again. 
To this Event 'the ages ran : 
Make way for Brotherhood — make way 
for Man. 

The first istep towards the solution of 
this great problem is Organization. The 
miners are organized into one great pow- 
erful oirganization. Winning for them- 
selves (by reason of the strength of their 
organization fair wages and fair treat- 
ment. Likewise every trade and profes- 
sion — we S'ee capital organized into the 
rrros't wonderful combination of Trusts 
and series of Trusts with a self protec- 
tive alliance binding them all together; 
whose present aggregation of wealth con- 
trolled directly and indirectly is greater 
than the United States Government. 

It is dictating the policies of our Gov- 
ernment, it is dictating the earning ca- 
pacity of our people and if not soon 
checked our boasted American freedom 
will have pnssed into his'tory and in its 
place will be seventy millions of white 
slaves bowing to the will of this mighty 
money power. 

In the face of all this evidence which 
we see of the fruits of organization along 
other lines, j^et we pause and hesitate — 
we find the farmers representing forty 
per cent of the population of the United 
States, the real producers of all this 
wealth, the foundation and support of 
commerce, the original creators and sup-» 
porters of this Governmlent, standing 
with folded warms in a spirit of abject 
helplessness. Plodding along alone with 
practically no organization. 

HOW SHALL WE ORGANIZE ? 

In what way and through what medi- 
um shall we get together ? "We all know 
that single handed and apart we are 
powerless to accomplish any results; but 
united as one man, for the common good 
of humanity, a,n organization of all work- 
ers can be effected that will make Wall 
Street look like 'thirty cents. 

Think of it ! A handful of a score of 
men, through the banks and trust com- 
panies of this country controlling abso- 
lutely the affairs of not only this Gov- 
ernment, but your destiny and my des- 
tiny, and this, 'too, when you have it in 
your power to fight these foes of Gov- 
ernment and of individual liberty to a 
victor'ious finish. 

Do you know of any good reason why 
any person should n'Ot become a member 
of the Grange ? To you men who have 
not joined, is it because you are afraid 
you will make your condition worse ? 
Are you afraid some thing will happen to 
you ? Let us arise in oiur might and take 
a hand in the fight between giants. Let 
us not he mindful of what the name of 
our vehicle may ibe, but choose the oldest 
and strongest and join hands to a man. 

THE ORDER OF THE GRANGE. 

The order of the Grange stands before 



the world with a record of high motives 
and the accomplishment of much good. 
It carries with vt the ennobling influence 
of full membership to women — ^God blesis 
them. There never was in all the history 
of the world any -really great achieve- 
ment, either national or individual, ac- 
complished without the aid of her love 
and hel'p and the present and future suc- 
cess of the Grange is, and will be, large- 
ly due to the uplifting influence of the 
good women who are members. While it 
is yet in its infancy it is forging ahead 
with rapid strides and my friend it don't 
make any difference how many other or- 
ders of a like chartaoter you may belong 
to, by all meanis beconfe a member of the 
Grange without delay— organization, con- 
solidation, is the watchword and the 
battle-cry to victory. I^et us no longer 
stand idly by in futile fault finding, but 
lot us get ready for the battle which is 
to come — not a battle of sword or musket, 
God forbid; but a battle glorious of bai- 
louts, a battle of brains and a battle of 
money. 

You have each of these factors in ma- 
jority numbers and the only thing you 
lack is concentration land organization. 
The time is not far distant when 'the 
control, the management, the domination 
of this Government and the making of 
our lawis will be transferred from Wall 
Street to you — it lies with j^ou to say 
how soon. 

Young man, I say to you, stick to the 
farm. The near future holds better and 
safer opportunities for you in this line 
tha.n any other I know of. The time is 
near when your calling will be fully rec- 
ognized by all classes as the most honor- 
able and most lucrative of any. 

There is just one wuy to win 'success, 
work unceasingly, work intelligently, 
study your conditions to increase your 
producing capacity. Train your life and 
mind that you may be fitted for any po- 
si'tion of trust to which you may be called, 
and above all else, my young friends, 
alK)ve money, power, eduoa.tion, brains, 
is eharact'^r. upon this depends the suc- 
cess and strength not only of our nation, 
but your siiccess individually. No man 
nor woman can win without it. 

I^et us eliminate all petty strife and 
jealousies from our order,l'et us widen the 
scope of our work and extend a cordial 
invitation to all toilers to jo'in our ranks. 
With the farmers of the country, the 
miners, tae mechanics, and the workers 
of all classes j'oined together into our 
great society, free from political pur- 
poses and beliefs, there will 'be such an 
array of forces presented upon the field 
of battle that the enemy will strike the 
fiag of truce; but when that 'time oomes 
there will be no truce, nothing but an un- 
conditional surrender. 

WHAT OUR GOVERNMENT WILL DO 
WHEN CONTROLLED BY THE PEO- 
PLE IN PLACE OF WALL STREET. 

We will say to this Government, we 
have created you and supported you, when 



13 



you needed men and money to defend our 
•country's flag you drew both from our 
ranks, we do not now ask for any 
special Legislation, we do not want any 
favors, all we ask is simple justice. And 
that we win have. 

We do not seek any monopoly, nor do 
we want to increase the cost of bread 
to those we feed, beyond a fair and hon- 
est value; but if you say that the combi- 
nation of capital in the 'manufacturing 
industries, for the purpose of impdver- 
ashing us by forcing us to take less for 
what we have to sell and to pay more for 
what we must buy, cannot be prevented, 
we want you, the creature of Govern- 
ment which we have created, to protect 
your people. We want you ito say to 
these Trusts, go on with your trafllc, we 
will go into the Trust business ourselves. 
We will build a government shoeshop, for 
illustration, and restore the old price of 
hides and shoes toy honest competition, 
pay fair wages for labor, and still make 
a profit for the Government into which 
everybody will share. 

Say 'to the sugar Trust, we will go into 
the sugar business and restore to the 
farmers 'the P'rofitable business of raising 
sugar beets, earn a profit on our Govern- 
ment investment and sell sugar for a 
cent a pound less than it is now being 
sold for, and save 'to the pockets of the 
great American people millions of dollars 
annually. 

Say to 'the Standard Oil Trust, the 
Supreme Court says you are doing a le- 
gal business and we do not want to harm 
you, we do not in'tend to confiscate your 
property, because in the first place it 
would not be fair nor right to do so, and 
in the second place we do not want your 
property, but we are going to withdraw 
Government protection. We will first 
remove the tariff on imported oil — so 
that if Germany or Russia can sell us 
finished illuminating oil at five cents per 
gallon (which is the standard seaboard 
price foT both import and export oil) we 
want every American family who uses 
oil to have the privilege of buying it at 
five cents per gallon in place of twelve 
and fourteen^ — as now charged by the 
Standard Oil Trust. We will say still 
further to this mighty Trust, we are go- 
ing to divide your hundred millions of 
annual profit among the farmers of the 
United States. We will do like Germany, 
remove the internal revenue tax 
from alcohol for manufacturing purposes 
only, such as light, heat and fuel, and 
let it become a natural competitor wi'th 
oil in accordance with the laws of God 
and nature. Germany last year produced 
three hundred million gallons of alcohol 
for this purpose and sold it cheaper than 
coal oil. 

Think for a moment what this would 
mean to every man, woman and child in 
the United States. Every field and every 
garden containing a vegetable, a corn 
stalk, or a grass blade, would have an 
additional earning power because of the 
alcohol they contain.and this man Rocke- 
teller who now Tx)as'ts that he h*s more 



money at his command than the United 
States Government, would have to look 
for another job. 

THE HIGHER REALMS OF FINANCE. 

I might go on and enumerate a dozen 
more articles of manufacture whereby 
the Government could restore honest com- 
petition; sell the product to the public 
for less money than they are now paying 
and still earn a net profit each year suf- 
ficient to pay off our national debt and 
lower our taxes. From the manufactur- 
ing class let us turn to the higher realms 
of finance. Take the Equitable Life In- 
surance Company for 'the illustration of 
a condition. 

The Equitable Life Insurance Company 
was founded about fifty years ago with a 
capital stock of one hundred thousand 
dollars, and to-day has assets to the value 
of four hundred millions of dollars. Think 
what a fabulous sum of money this is 
and think of the possibilities for a Na- 
tional life insurance company, operated 
by and for the people of the United 
States through the agency of this Gov- 
ernment. If a little one hors'e individual 
company with a capital of one hundred 
thousand , can earn four hundred millions 
in fifty years, I ask you hi all fairness, 
is It not reasonable to believe that the 
profits to the Government from a national 
insurance company would be something 
fabulous. I venture this assertion with- 
out fear of successful contradiction, that 
a national insurance company would be 
earning within three years enough money 
working along the same lines of the pres- 
ent insurance companies to pay one-half 
of the entire taxation of the United 
States and a,t practica,lly no risk of loss 
to Government moneys. I believe that a 
farmers' and laborers' national life in- 
surance company in the near future is 
possible. 

And why should not some of these 
things be ? Why should our Government 
not be run in the interests of all people, 
instead of a few ? Why should not this 
Government be a creator instead of an 
absorber of our nation's vitality ? Why 
not be an earner instead of a spender of 
money ? 

When we remember that our taxes are 
levied merely to pay the running cost of 
our Government, why should it not be at 
least self supporting through legitimate 
commercial enterprises ? I would not 
have our government enter the field of 
competition as against our snnaller ajid 
diversified industries;nor should It go to 
the extent of suppressing Individual am- 
bition which has made this country com- 
mercially famous; bait when we see all In- 
dividual ambition, all competition crush- 
ed by ruthless monopolies along certain 
lines,. It is then the duty of this Govern- 
ment to restore honest competition for 
the benefit of all the people through the 
agency of I'ts great influence, and power. 

To silence all unfair criticisms which 
will probably arise concerning these 
statements, I wa;nt to say to you publicly 



14 



here and now, that I will be one of five 
public spirited men to furnish a bond to 
the Uni'ted States Government in the sum 
of five hundred thousand dollars guaran- 
teeing this Government against loss in 
appropriating the sum of money or any 
sum necessap^ to establish a Government 
life insurance company — such a company 
under the management of an honest, 
fearless, able man like President Roose- 
velt would be an immediate and lasting 
success. 

The successful political party of the fu- 
ture must emuraice municipal or Govern- 
ment ownership along conservative lines. 
We are not, in my judgement, ready yet 
to embrace the idea of the .municipal 
ownership of railroads, and it will prob- 
ably be a long way ofT and is a problem 
to be approached with extreme caution. 
In trying to lessen our burden of debt 
and increase our individual income thru 
Government help, by tne restoration of 
honest competition, we do not want to 
make the mistake of plunging headlong 
in debt, buying a lot of watered stock and 
increasing the very 'burden of indebted- 
ness we seek to avoid. But the Govern- 
ment can approach the solution of this 
problem along paths of absolute safety by 
beginning with a national insurance com- 
pany and with these profits enlarge the 
sphere of national commercial activity 
along the lines I have briefly mentioned. 

THE PEOPLE OF WALL STREET. 

I believe, my friends, you all agree with 
me in this matter and also agree that it is 
not a question of party or politics. It Is 
a question of the people, or "Wall Street. 
And the only way foY- you to help an- 
swer the question and accomplish the 
good work which is apparently before you 
is for all classes of men and -women who 
toil for their daily bread, to unite in one 
co'mmon brotherhood. 

Ask yourself this question : If in fifty 
years one-eighth of the people can ac- 
quire and control seven-eights of all the 
wealth of the country, how long at this 
same rate will it take them to get the 
remaining eighth ? It is a question worthy 
of the most serious thought of -every 
patriotic, home loving citizen. 

' WHAT CAN WE DO OURSELVES. 

"While we agree that the Government 
can do a great deal to help us and that 
we must become nationally strong before 
we can expect such support, now let us 
see if there is not something we can do 
ourselves, in the meantime. 

Tou all know the Biblical story of the 
ten talents. Before you can conscien- 
tiously ask this Government to help you 
or before you can rightfully condemn the 
greedy capitalists, you must first demon- 
strate your own strength and your own 
willingness to help, yourselves. My friends 
what are you doing with your talents ? 
"What are you doing with this thing called 
money ? "With this thing of man's cre- 
ation which of necessity has made every 



man's and woman's life a fierce battle 
from the cradle to the grave — 'the dollar ? 
Have you got It working for you Intelli- 
gently, while you work and while you 
sleep, No ? Ah, here is the supreme fault 
in this whole problem. 

Single handed and alone you could not 
accomplish much in the commercial world, 
but unite your forces and you become 
the powerful factor you have a right to 
be. Men, why don't you get togetheg^and 
grasp the opportunities which await you? 
Why don't you create places in the busi- 
ness world for some of these bright, man- 
ly boys and young men I see before me, 
whose frank.open countenances bear the 
stamp of honesty and clean manly char- 
acter which the mothers of Columbia 
County, second to no motherhood in the 
world, know how to give their sons. 

I tell you, my friends, I am proud of my 
county and still prouder of her people, 
and with all the earnestness I possess, let 
me persuade you to rise in the strength 
and means which God has given you, 
and act. 

In Columbia County there are 8,000 
farmers, mechanics, miners and laborers 
over twenty-one years old. Thus we see 
that 95 per cent, of our male population 
are toilers and real producers of real 
wealth. The man who works as a day 
laborer is just as much a producer to the 
extent of his efforts as the farmer or 
manufacturer. 

There are nine banks and one trust 
company in this county, carrying an ag- 
gregate line of deposits ai-ound $2,000,- 
000. Now this money belongs to the people. 
It is fair to say that 60 per cent, belongs 
to the farmers and laborers. Here Is a 
point I want you to remember — you have 
been content to create the dollar, now 
why don't you make that dollar earn 
something for you ? 

The Individual actual cash balance, not 
including any property of the farmers and 
laborers of Coluimbia County as nearly as 
I can estimate is $1,200,000. 

In the State of Pennsylvania, there is 
over four hundred million dollars of actual 
cash, belonging to the farmers and labor- 
ers now lying in the vaults of our banks 
and trust companies, or enough money to 
buy the Pennsylvania Railroad, and if you 
owned the Pennsylvania Railroad, you 
would find that in some unaccountable 
way you had at the same time secured 
the ownership of the Pennsylvania Legis- 
lature, for they seem to be one and in- 
separable, 

Think of the things you could accom- 
plish If you had this vast shm under 
scientific control In your own interests. 
It is all your money, and yet you will 
stand back and transfer this stewardship 
which 'has been entrusted to you to the 
keeping of other hands. In doing so, you 
are guilty of criminal neglect to the in- 
terests of your families and to the mem- 
ories of OUT Revolutionary fathers whose 
blood purchased our freedom and estab- 
lished a Government for all people. And 
to the trust that God has placed in you 
in making you the stewards of this earth. 



J% 



OWN AND CONTROL YOUR OWN 
BANKS. 

The solution of this great political, so- 
cial and financial problem Is just as easy 
and simple as It Is safe and soamd — own 
your own toanks and control your own 
money. 

Suppose, by way of illustration, the 
farmers and laborers of Columbia County 
would organize their own national bank 
and trust comi>any. Making a central 
place of deposit, for your working ajnd 
surplus money. You would have on de- 
posit a half million dollars within the 
first year of starting your bank. That 
bank stock which would cost you one 
hundred dollars per share would within 
two years be worth one hundred and 
fifty dollars per share. 

If I would say to you, I will sell you a 
horse for one hundred dollars, you can 
use him two years and I will pay for his 
feed and give you one hundred and fifty 
dollars for the same horse at the end of 
two years, you would want a carload of 
such horses right away and would borrow 
the money if necessary to buy ithem. 

Now compare the value of your farm 
property with the bank stock of Columbia 
County. I know, and so do you, that 
farm land is selling to-day for from 
twenty-five to forty per cent, less than it 
did ten years ago. I know of instances 
in our own comanunity where farms are 
offered to-day for sale for little more 
than the cost of the buildings. Farm land 
is about the only thing that Wall Street 
don't want to buy, because it takes too 
much hard work to handle it, and as Wall 
Street regulates all prices of all commo- 
dities, It is plain to see why the values 
of farm land do not advance in keeping 
with other values. Wall Street says to 
you, go ahead and work your land, we 
don't want it. All we want is the money 
you receive from your crops and through 
the presein't system of flhance you imme- 
diately turn your crops over to Wall 
Street and while you sweat and groan and 
labor and complain in farming the land, 
the families of Wall Street are having 
a good itime, making fortunes and farm- 
^Ing you while you farm the land. 

On the other hand, there is not a bank 
stock in the county that can be bought 
for less than fifty per cent above par, and 
from that on up to two hundred per cent, 
ajbove par and they are all showing this 
splendid value from a cash earning stand-- 
I)oint. 

Now you men and women should be the 
real owners of these banks, because it is 
your deposit money that makes every 
National or State bank a success. Some 
of the New York banks, which you are 
helping to feed through your home bank 
depositories are paying from one hundred 
to two hundred per cent annual dividends. 

Think of It ! Getting back in dividends 
each year the amount of this original in- 
vestment. Can you not see now how 
money grows and how through your own 
neglect, you are not getting your share ? 
Can you not see why It Is that other men 
in othep callings are outstripping you in 



this race. Can you not see that the 
money which you make during the sum- 
mer should be working for you and earn- 
ing something for you during the long 
winter months when nature enforces com- 
parative idleness ? 

The ownership and management of 
your own banks is the second step in the 
advancement of your cause^ BVom the 
profits of this enterprise will come other 
investments that will increase your pres- 
ent earnings one hundred per cent. 

Of the first profits from your bank you 
should build a county elevator, where the 
farmer of small means can take his grain 
at any time of year when prices are low 
and deposit his grain and take his ware- 
house receipt to the bank and get seven- 
ty-five per cent of the value of his grain 
advanced until the market price is suf- 
ficiently high for him to sell. I know 
hundreds of farmers who are too poor 
to carry their grain over a low market 
and are compelled to sell to get their 
money regardless of price. 

I hope soon to see the day when farm- 
ers and laborers of Pennsylvania will set 
the example for the world and begin the 
concentration of their energies along 
scientific lines. Own your own commer- 
cial enterprises, own your own banks and 
trust companies under the management 
of yourselves and your sons. 

Your sons are ambitious; they want to 
make money;th6y want to go to the cities 
in a vain search for opportunity. They 
know that your money is going there. Keep 
your money at home and let your sons 
know that you need their help to manage 
it and this problem of keeping the young 
men upon the farm will have been solved. 
Your stewardship has been faulty, cor- 
rect it at the earliest moment before it 
is too late. It is not merely a question 
of immediate or future profit, but a duty 
which you owe to your families and hu- 
manity. 

Suppose the farmers and laborers of 
any one county unite in the mutuarown- 
ership of their own savings ^bank and 
trust company, and it proves a great suc- 
cess, which it surely will — then suppose 
each county in the -State and nation fol- 
lows, which it will as surely as the day 
follows the night. Then I ask you, who 
are the money kings of the country — ^Wall 
Street, which does not create a single 
real dollar, or you men and women who 
are each year producing in actual wealth, 
more money than the entire gold pro- 
duction of the United States from the 
time of the first gold discovery up to the 
present day ? This is not a mere state- 
ment, but an actual fact. 

The total sum of gold produced in the 
United States since the date of the first 
discovery up to the present day, is less 
than two and at hallf billion of dollars, 
while the American farmer is now pro- 
ducing each yea;r in actual cash from his 
crops and live stock between four and 
five billion of dollars. Can't you see, my 
friends, that the farmers and laborers 6f 
this country are the producers and the 
real owners of the actual cas-h. 



i6 



In marketing this season's crop, this 
vast sum of money passes through your 
hands first, and if you would retain con- 
trol of your surplus after deducting your 
producing cost, you are at once the kings 
of the money power of this country, 'be- 
cause Wall Street has no money of lt» 
own. It has nothing but stocks and bonds, 
you are the real possessor of the real cash. 

The farmer and the laborer need have 
no quarrel with capital if they can be 
trained to use the surplus wealth which 
they produce as represented in their own 
net cash earnings, in a scientific manner. 

In no instance do we seek to 'antagonize 
capital. "We merely want to husband and 
control our own forces ajnd "with this aitti- 
tude the capitalist can find no fault. 

If through this means we can elevate 
the farmers' condition individually and as 
a class, it means that all other classes, 
business men and financiers as well, ajre 
correspondingly benefitted, for the true 
source of wealth and prosperity must 
spring from ithe prosperity of the many 
and not the few. 

All local bankers should welcome this 
condition — full 40 per cent of the farmers 
and laborers do not caircry any bank ac- 
count. It is infinitely better that we teach 
them to save their money and invest it 
wisely than that it should be squandered 
in the indiscriminate investment of 
mining and other wild cat/ schemes. 

Strong banks in a community reflect 
the financial strength ^f^/the community. 
It is the strength of th6 individual that 
makes strong communities. So in our 
effort to strengthen the farmers and la- 
borers class individually and collectively 
we should have the hearty co-operation 
of all broad minded bankers and business 
men in general. 

THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A 
GRANGERS' BANK IN ANY COUNTY 
WILL NOT ONLY NOT T/GSSEN IN ANY 
DEGREE THE EARNING POWER OJt-' 
ANY OTHER BANKS ALREADY ES- 
TABLISHED, BUT ON THE CONTRARY 
WILL GIVE THEM ADDED STRENGTH 
BECAUSE OF THE NEW BUSINESS 



CREATED AND THE INCREASED 
AND WIDE SPREAD INDIVIDUAL. 
PROiSPERITY AND THRIFT THAT 
MUST NECESSARILY FOL.IX)W THIS 
MOVEMENT. 

Shall we wait, or shall we take the 
lead, shall we coax and beg, or shall we 
demand our rights in the name of 'hu- 
manity and of those we love. The owner- 
ship of railroads, the ownership of the 
trusts, the ownership of the commercial 
supremacy of this world, and above all 
else the control of this Government which 
rightfully belong to you, lies within your 
reach. Will you grasp the' opportunity ? 
It is for you to say if Pennsylvania will 
be the central, star in this movement to- 
ward the people's freedom — the people's 
happiness and the world's prosperity. 

With the means 'that Is annually being 
placed in our hands, and with the help 
of Him who is always behind the right, 
we fail in our duty as citizens, we fail in 
our duties to our families, and in our 
duty to God in the refusal of our indi- 
vidual aid, in this struggle to save our 
people and ourselves from the money 
slavery which is surely closing in upon us. 

Opportunity. 

"Master of 'human destinies am I; 
Love, Fame and Fortune on my foot- 
steps wait; 
Cities and fields I walk. I penetrate 
Deserts and sca>s remote, and passing by 
Hovel- and mart and palace, soon or late 
1 knock unbidden once at every gate. 
If sleeping wake ! If feasting rise 
Before I turn away ! It is the hour of 

Fate 
And those who follow me, reach every 

state 
Mortals desire, and conquer every foe 
Save death; but they who doubt or hesi- 
tate, 
Condemned to failure, penury and woe, 
Seek me in vain, and uselessly implore 
I liear them not, and I return no more." 

Farmers and tollers of all classes, your 
opportunity is before you; may you have 
the strength and courage and help of 
God to unite and grasp it. 




/ 



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PENNSYLVANIA 

GRANGE NEWS: 



JANUARY, 1906. 



% 



Containing the Journal of Proceedings of the 
Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of thePennsylvania 
State Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 



i 
It- 




I 



_^UNBURY, F^. 

DECEMBER 12, 13, 14, 15, 

1905. 






3a!WCFS??^!S^- 



'> 






'. ■ ^■■- 1^ 






i6 



jr^' 



In marketing 'this season's crop, this 
vast sum of money passes through your 
hands first, and if you would /retain con- 
trol of your surplus after deducting your 
producing cost, you are at once the kings 
of the money power of this country, 'be- 
cause Wall Street has no money of lt» 
own. It has nothing but stocks and bonds, 
you are the real possessor of the real cash. 

The farmer and the laborer need have 
no quarrel with capital if they can be 
trained to use the surplus wealth which 
they produce as represented in their own 
net cash earnings, in a scientific manner. 

In no instance do we seek to antagonize 
capital. We merely want to husband and 
control our own forces and with this atti- 
tude the capitalist can find no fault. 

If through this means we can elevate 
the farmers' condition individually and as 
a class, it means that all other classes, 
business men and financiers as well, are 
correspondingly benefitted, for the true 
source of wealth and prosperity must 
spring from the prosperity of the many 
and not the few. 

All local bankers., sliould welcome this 
condition— full- 40 per cent of the farmers 
and laborers, do not carry any bank ac- 
count. It is' infinitely better tliat we teach 
Ihem to pave their money and invest it 
wisely than that it should be squandered 
in the indiscriminate investment of 
mining and other wild cat schemes. 

Strong banks In a community reflect 
the fiiiJincial strength ^f the community. 
It is the strength of the individual that 
makes strong communities. So in • our 
effort to strengthen the farmers and la- 
borers class individually and collectively 
we should have the hearty co-operation 
of all broad minded bankers and business 
men in general. 

the establishment of a 
grancrers'- bank in. -any county 
wit.i.^^'ot ont.y no'l^ i /essen in any 
i}Bg6ee the earning power of 
<\^x other b vnks at:reat)v es- 
tablished, BUT ON the contrary 
will give them added strength 
because of the new business 



CREATED and THE INCREASED 
AND WIDE SPREAD INDIVIDUAX. 
prosperity AND THRIFT THAT 
MUST NECESSARILY FOLLOW THIS 
MOVEMENT. 

Shall we wait, or shall we take the 
lead, shaill we coax and beg, or shall we 
demand our rights in the name of hu- 
manity and of those we love. The owner- 
ship of railroads, the ownership of the 
trusts, the ownership of the cornmercial 
supremacy of this world, and above all 
else the control of this Govern.ment which 
riglit fully belong to you, lies within your 
reach. Will you grasp the opportunity ? 
It is for you to say if Pennsylvania will 
be the central star in this movement to- 
ward the people's freedom — the people's 
happiness and the world's prosperity. 

With the means that is annually being 
placed in our hands, and with the help 
of Him who is always behind the right, 
we fail in our duty as citizens, we fail in 
our duties to our families, and in our 
duty to God in the refusal of our indi- 
vidual aid, in this struggle to save our 
people and ourselves from the money 
slavery which is surely closing in upon us. 



Opportunity. 



V. 



•"Maslcr of 'human destinies am I; 
!.o\'c\ Fame and Fortune on my foot- 
steps w'ait; 
Cities and fields I walk. I penetrate 
l~)eserts and sea-s r -mote, and passing by 
!!ovel;!nd mart and palace, soon or late 
1 knock unbidden once at every gate. 
If sleeping wake ! If feasting rise 
]!efore I turn awav ! It is the hour of 

Fate 
And those who follow me, reach every 

state 
INIortals desire, and conquer every foe 
Save death; but they who doubt or hesi- 
tate, 
Condemned to failure, penury and woe. 
Seek me in vain, and uselessly implore 
I hear them not, and I return no more." 

Farmers and toilers of all classes, your 
opportunity is 'before you; may you have 
the strength and courage and help of 
God to unite and grasp it. 




INTENTIONAL 2ND EXPOSURE 



1 , T 



\ 



^"■^ 







vo. 



^< 



PENNSYLVANIA 

GRANGE NEWS: 



JANUARY, 1906. 



NV 



Containing the Journal of Proceedings of the 
Thirty-Third Annual Meeting of thePennsylvania 
State Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 




SUNBURY, PA. 

DECEMBER 12, 13, 14, 15, 

1905. 



I..,,..-:.:; 



-J*.».'i ,L.'.^f-t^iiiLJ^-/:£ •!., ^jL.tuJ^\*i,, .■W.iW-ji-^^Vl* i^_-.-W;^i:.^i%.j.1;i 



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VOL. II. Nc 



G. \ 

Editor Bxecutiv( 

Official pul 




record of 
and will I 
worthy of 
The 
be read in 
to alL T 
Let t 
known to 
Wew 
the worfcin 
State Grai 
informatioi 



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Txrbltslrerl bg the T^nnsglxranta ^tuU (Srauge 



VOL. 11. No. 6 



JANUARY, J906 



25 Cents per Ybak. 
5 Cents per Copy 



Editor. 
G. W^. OSTER, W. T. CREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. Editor I^egislative Committee Department 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered August 9, 1904. at Chambersburg, Pa. 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress ol July 16, 1894 



COMMENT. 




E devote this issue to a report of the Proceed- 
ings of the Thirty-third Annual Session of 
the Pennsylvania State Grange, held at 
Sunbury, on December J 2, 13, J4, 15, 1905.- 
This Journal of Proceedings is the official 
record of that meeting as kept by the State Secretary, 
and will be found to be interesting reading and well 
worthv of preservation. 

The Master can find many selections that may 
be read in the meetings of your Grange with benefit 
to alL The same applies to the Lecturer. 

Let the good news and good suggestions be 
known to all of the Patrons. 

We want each member to be fully informed upon 
the workings, the condition, and the progress of the 
State Grange, and this issue gives a lot of valuable 
information along these lines EDITOR. 



\ 



L 



H 



V 



si 



1 



-'I 



INDEX 



Opening '^ 

Programme 4 

Worthy Master's Address • 5 

Appointment of Committees 13 

Committee on Master's Address 14 

Report of Overseer 14 

Report of Lecturer 15 

Report of Steward 16 

Report of Treasurer 17 

List of Representatives 19 

Report of Secretary 22 

Report of Ciiaplain 26 

Public Meeting 26 

Report of Ceres • 27 

Report of Flora 2S 

Report of Pomona 2S 

Report of L. A. S 29 

Reception of Bro. Kelly , 31 

Committee of 59 31 

Report of Executive Committee 33 

Prize Banners f 33 

Report of Legislative Committee 37 

Supplementary Report of Legislative Committee 40 

Press Editor ! 41 

Report of Committee of 59 43 

Fifth Degree Conferred 50 

Sixth Degree Conferred 51 

Committee on Good of the Order , 59 

Committee's Report on Master's Address 62 

Report of Committee on Transportation .< 64 

Report of Committee on Constitution and By-Laws 64 

Report of Finance Committee 65 

Report of Resolutions 65 

Report of Committee on Grievances 66 

Report of Committee on Education 67 

Report of Committee on Domestic Economy 68 

Report of Committee on Dairy Interests 69 

Report of Committee on Temperance 69 

Report of Committee on Co-Operation 70 

Report of Committee on Dormant Granges 71 

Report of Committee on Fruit and Honey Interests 73 

Report of Credential Committee 75 






PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE 

Patrons of Husbandry. 



PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 



Thirty-Third Annual Session, held at Sunbury, 
Pa., December 12, 13, 14, 15, 1905. 

TUESDA Y FORENOON. 

The Pennsylvania State Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, met in its Thirty- 
Third Annual Session in the Armory in Sunbury, Pa., at 10:30 o'clock, a. m., 
with Worthy Master, W. F. Hill in the chair, and all of the other officers in 
their places. 

An unusually large number of Delegates were present at the opening 
session. 

The State Grange was duly opened in full form. 

The Worthy Chaplain, Rev. J. W. Johnson, offered prayer as follows : 

We acknowledge Thee, Oh God. Author of all life; giver of all good; we 
bless and praise Thy holy name. 

Through another year Thou hast safely brought ua By its experiences 
we are made richer in body, mind 'and soul. 

To-day we come to this, our annual meeting, bearing the harvest sheaves 
from the sowing of the past. We thank Thee for material prosperity; for seed- 
time and an abundant harvest. We thank Thee for every victory won in 
the interest of the great calling we represent. Above all, we thank Thee for 
the nobler, truer manhood and womanhood wrought in us through Thy bless- 
ing, by our beloved order. 

And now. Oh God, as we again assemble to take account of the past, con- 
sider the present, and plan for the future, let Thy blessing rest upon us. En- 
dow us with prudence and wisdom in our deliberations, that in all things Thy 
name may be honored and glorified. 

Bless him who presides over us, we pray Thee, and give him a heart, 
honest in purpose, a mind quick to apprehend, and a hand steady to guide us, 
so that the greatest possible good may be accomplished. Oh, Thou God of 
the seed-time and harvest, grant that we may here be able to sow such seed 
as shall spring up and bring forth an hundred fold of blessing in the year 
that is before us. Take from us all that is selfish in spirit, and while we seek 
to advance our own interest in everyMegitimate way, give us the desire and 
. the power to help every interest and be a blessing to the world. Bless us, we 
pray Thee, in our National life. May righteousness triumph and evil be 
overcome with good. Remember kindly and endow with wisdom our beloved 
President and all tliat have authority over us. 

- Let Thy peace abide in the hearts and rule in the actions of men until the 
world's antagonisnis shall be forgotten, and the ideal peace shall be brought 
forth. And now. Oh God, thanking Thee for Thy blessings upon the grreat 
order of Patrons of Husbandry, we earnestly pray that Thou wilt help us, and 
all Patrons that we may merit the continuance of Thy favor, and to Thy 
name will we ascribe the honor and glory, now and evermore. Amen. 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE^ 



The following were appointed Assistant Stewards by the Worthy Master : 
William E. Wright, 1177, Crawford. 
C. S. Bates, 1074 Wayne. 
W. Logan Rogers, 1220 Chester. 
John S. Dale, 109 Centre. 
A. S. Worden, 1183 Potter. 
O. C. Tingley, 289 Susquehanna. 

Bro. G. W. Oster, of the Executive Committee presented the following 
resolution : 

Resolved, that the hours of opening and closing the State Grange shall he 
from 9 a. m., until 12 m., and from 2 p. m., until 4:30 p. m., and the evening 
session from 7:30 until the labors of the day are completed, and that the 
suggested program as published in the December issue of the Penn'a Grange 
NewiS on page 6, be adopted. 

Tuesday, December 12, 10:30 a. m. 

Called to order; receiving credentials and opening Grange. 11 a. m.. 
Grange to go into open session for the delivery of the annual address of the 
Worthy Master. The general public admitted at this hour. 

Tuesday, p. m. 

Reports of other officers; appointments of committees; reception of reso- 
lutions. 

Tuesday evening. 

A public reception to the officers and delegates of the Penn'a State 
Grange by the city of Sunbury and Pomona Grange No. 31. 

Wednesday, a. m. " 

General discussion and addresses. 



Wednesday, p. m. 

Reports of Executive Committee and of Legislative Committee, 
duction of further resolutions, addresses, discussions, etc. 



Intro- 



Wednesday evening. 

Session will be held in the Sixth Degree, when the beautiful Degree of 
Flora will be conferred on all qualified applicants, to be followed by an Il- 
lustrated lecture upon grafting chestnuts, their cultivation and adaptability 
to Penn'a. conditions. 

Thursday a. m. 

Reports of committees, discussion of their reports and of resolutions. 

Thursday, p. m' 

The election of one member to serve three years upon the Executive Com- 
mittee; one member to serve three years upon the Finance Committee; reports 
of committees and discussion upon the same. 

Thursday evening. 

Final reports of all committees; addresses; closing in time to allow for a 
social, literary and musical hour at the respective hotels. 

Friday a. m. 

Payment of all bills, including R. R. fare of delegates by the Treasurer; 
completion of unfinished business; final closing of the Grange in full form. 
The closing ceremony of the State Grange is very impressive and no one should 
miss it who can possibly be present. 

S. S. Blyholder, of No. 549 Armstrong County, was appointed to take 
charge of the music with Sister Jessie Ikler, of 52 Columbia County, as organist. 

Worthy Master W. F. Hill then presented his annual address, which was 
received and on motion referred to a committee of seven members to be ap- 
pointed by the Worthy Overseer. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



TO Officers and Members of 
the State Grange: — Pur- 
suant to the mandates of 
the Constitution of this 
Order, the Pennsylvania 
State Grange has met to- 
day in annual session. For thirty- 
three years has this custom annually 
been observed and it is now looked 
upon as one of the fixtures in the 
economic and social life of the Key- 
stone State. Since the establishment 
of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry 
upon our soil, the great majority of 
the first workers who were identified 
with the order have been gathered 
home to their fathers. So deep did 
they lay the foundations, so true were 
the walls and so well did they build 
that we who have succeeded to their 
heritage have a solid structure upon 
which to further build. In paying 
this tribute to the memory and work 
of those who have gone before us in 
this glorious fraternity, I desire to 
express the hope that the work now 
being done by the thousands of pres- 
ent active workers scattered all over 
Pennsylvania will be of such charac- 
ter as to merit and receive the com- 
mendation of those who in later years 
will come after us. A tremendous re- 
sponsibility rests upon the members 
of this order. Do we realize it fully 
and are we awake to our opportuni- 
ties ? The possibilities 'ior doing good 
to ourselves and to our fellow-men 
are many and varied, as the needs for 
human betterment stare us in the 
face on every hand. Although the 
Grange stands primarily for the 
farmer and his family, yet it unsel- 
fishly contributes a large share to the 
world's good. The very foundation 
principles and tenets of our order be- 
speak these results and the Grange 
in Pennsylvania is doing its full share 
In carrying out the purposes and 
hopes of the order. I now have the 
honor to present to this body some- 
what in detail something of the work 
achieved in our State during the past 
year. 

Conclltion of the Order. 

The condition of the order through- 
out the State is reflected at the State 
Grange meetings in a number of ways. 
I congratulate the State Grange upon 
the marked improvement that is be- 
ing mode from year to year. A larger 
spirit of fraternity is obtaining; a 
more uniform determination to 
unitedly work for thie principles for 
which the Grange stands; a larger 
number of eflicient Grange workers 
being developed throughout the State; 
our good financial standing and sys- 
tematic methods of work, all unite in 
making the condition of the order one 
worthy of commendation. While it is 



true that the heavy expenses incurred 
by reason of holding the last session 
of the State Grange in an extreme 
corner of the State was a heavy drain 
upon our State Grange treasury yet. 
the reports of the Secretary and 
Treasurer which will be submitted to 
you later will show our treasury to 
be again in good condition. The 
Grange should guard its treasury 
carefully, authorizing only such ex- 
penditures as after consideration shall 
appear to be judicious. Prudence in 
the use of our resoui-ces should be 
coupled with cour'^ge to do those 
things new or old which are clearly 
shown to be for the good of the order 
throughout the State. The Worthy 
Lecturer, Worthy Secretary and all 
committees which are in continuous 
touch with Grange work in the inter- 
um between the sessions have applied 
themselves, each and all, with their 
usual devotion in their respective 
fields of labor. The relations between 
the various ofl^cerg and committee- 
men of the State Grange are and al- 
ways have been most pleasant and 
harmonious. The -eports from Sub- 
ordinate Granges made to this office 
by the deputy forces warrant the con- 
viction that a healthy condition gen- 
erally prevails in the various Subor- 
dinate Granges. In my opinion, how- 
ever, there is room for improvement 
in our deputy services. I feel that it 
would be well for some changes to be 
made along these lines and in this 
connection I respectfully refer to the 
suggestions made in my annual ad- 
dress of one year ago under the head 
of "Deputy Service." 

Gain in Membership. 

There have been added to our five 
hundred and forty Subordinate 
Granges six thousand more names 
than they had upon their rolls one 
year ago. This is a very large addi- 
tion to the membership -of any order 
for any State in the Union and com- 
pares very favorably with the gains 
we have made in the immediately pr«- 
ceeding years. This large gain in 
membership exceeds the gain made In 
every other State in the Union with 
the posible exception of one or two. 
It indicates that the Grange In this 
State is conducted along lines that 
meet the endorsement of our Grange 
merfibership and the approval of 
farmers outside our gates. Let us 
hold fast to these policies which past 
experience has proven to be worthy 
ones and at the same time not be 
afraid to try such new ones as give 
reasonable promise of being helpful 
in improving the conditions of th© 
farmers in this State. 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



Picnic Work. 

The wisdom of holding picnics or 
field meetings seems to be acknowl- 
edged by all. In the interest of great- 
er economy both in the time devoted 
to it by the speakers and in the money 
expended by State Grange, it seems 
to be advisable that as large a num- 
ber as possible of picnics should be 
•under partial State Grange control. 
It is, however, a difficult and laborious 
task on the part of the State Grange 
officer who tries to arrange for meet- 
ings and to assign speakers with com- 
plete satisfaction to all concerned. 
By reason of my absence from home 
during the early summer, I asked the 
State secretary to assume charge of 
these assignments. I am sure that 
with this experience he now feels as 
I do that it is a laborious task from 
which one receives little credit and 
some censure. Recommendations or 
instructions from this body on this 
subject will be welcomed by the offi- 
cers of the State Grange. 

Pomona Granges. 

This unit of our organization seems 
to be somewhat isolated. The charac- 
ter of the work as well as the manner 
in which it is done frequently depend 
more upon caprice than upon system. 
They are designed to have charge of 
the business interest of the order 
within their respectivt jurisdictions. 
They are not endowed with legisla- 
tive functions in any way and it is 
perhaps not advisable that they 
should be. The success achieved by 
this unit of our order in conducting 
Grange Fire Insurance Companies is 
an evidence of how successful they 
may be along business lines. Pomonas 
may properly give attention to non- 
partisan matters of public interest in 
their respective counties. The admin- 
istration of public affairs within a 
county, such as the l:iuilding of county, 
bridges, and their cost, the construc- 
tion and maintenance of improved 
roads, agricultural high schools, 
township high schools, etc., are all 
matters for proper consideration by 
Pomona Granges. The Pomona ought 
also to exercise supervision over the 
deputy force in the 'county, exacting 
a report from each deputy as to his 
work for the order during the quarter 
since the last session and to join with 
him in rendering assistance where 
needed for the up-building of weak 
and struggling Granges. The State 
Grange will, I doubt not, render fi- 
nancial assistance to any Pomona 
Grange that will make a systematic 
effort to strengthen existing weak 
Granges or to organize new ones in 
unoccupied territory. 



The National Grange. 

The last session of the National 
Grange which was so recently held in 
our sister State of New Jersey, was 
as usual attended by a large and en- 
thusiastic body of Patrons. The body 
endorsed its former positions on pub- 
lic questions and in response to solici» 
tation from a committee of manufac- 
turers went on record as favoring the 
denaturization of alcohol. The pur- 
pose of this movement is to have 
Congress remove the internal taxjrona 
alcohol that may be used in the arts 
and for industrial purposes. The in- ^ 
ternal tax of two dollars and eight ' 
cents per gallon is now levied on all 
alcohol. It is proposed to remove 
this tax from such portion of the to- 
tal output of alcohol as may be 
spoiled for beverage purposes by the 
introduction of some acid or poison 
which renders it unfit for drinking. 
It was believed by the National 
Grange that this action would go a 
long way toward giving the people ol 
this country cheaper fuel and cheaper^ 
lights. This movement was, I believe, 
unanimously supported as was the 
movement endorsing the attitude of 
President Roosevelt in his desire to 
enlarge the powers of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission, giving it the 
authority to regulate freight rates. 
The body also endorsed the movement 
for an International Institute of Agri- 
culture. The biennial election of offi- 
cers occurred at this session. Bro. 
Jones positively declined a re-election 
and Bro. Bachelder, of New Hamp- 
shire, was elected to the position of 
Master. As many Patrons from this 
State were in attenriance at the meet- 
ing and the newspapers of Philadel- 
phia and other parts of the State 
made such full reports of the ^ork it 
is not advisable fo^ me to comment 
on it at greater length at this time. 

State Grange Publcity Work. 

Many newspapers throughout the 
State have Grange columns or Grange 
departments that are ably managed. 
Besides being a department contain- 
ing much of interest to the reading 
public they also aid materially in the 
dissemination of the principles of our 
order. I desire to publicly express ap- 
preciation of this spirit on the part of 
the newspaper fraternity and to urge 
Grange members every place to help 
make this department more interest- 
ing and valuable by furnishing the 
papers witli such Grange itemg and 
incidents as come under your observa- 
tion. 

To attract attention and gain a 
hearing in these strenuous days a 
business has to be advertised and pop- 



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PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



' I 



ularlzed. I consider the extension of 
our order and the advancement of 
its principles a business proposition 
pure and simple. The work of each 
branch of the varied activiites of our 
order should always be preceded by 
carefully laid out plans and then be 
pushed as though there were no such 
word as "fail" in the Grange diction- 
ary. One of the most potent agencies 
to help every department of Grange 
work is the printed page. When this 
is under control of the State Grange 
It can then always be held true to its 
purposes. The State Grange has such 
a medium in "Pennsylvania Grange 
News" which has now been on trial 
for about sixteen months and it is 
continually becoming more and more 
serviceable to the order in this <State. 
"While the editing and publishing of 
a magazine of this character was en- 
tirely new to all of us and while it has 
taken all of us a good while to adapt 
ourselves to this new plan of commu- 
nication, and while it has not yet at- 
tained to the full measure of value 
that such a publication may be made 
to the Grange organization in this 
State, yet enough has been demon- 
strated to show that this is one of the 
best moves that has ever been entered 
upon by the State Grange. Many 
other State Granges have Lecture 
Bulletins, but this in addition to meet- 
ing the requirements as a Lecture 
Bulletin is sufficiently comprehensive 
in its scope to serve all the depart- 
ments of our order. The postofflce 
franchise under which it was entered 
was granted by Act of Congress, 1894, 
and applies to publications of fratern- 
al orders and advertising matter is 
debarred. During the year your Ex- 
ecutive Committee made application 
for a change of franchise with a view 
to securing the privilege of inserting 
advertising matter in the columns of 
"Pennsylvania Grange News." The 
requests of our business houses and 
a large number of members who 
wished to advertise live stock, etc., 
seemed to imply that advertising 
space in the magazine would be in 
demand. The Department at Wash- 
ington declined, however, to grant any 
change in the franchise until it was 
acted upon and asked for by this body 
in session. The matter is, therefore, 
referred to the State Grange for its 
consideration. 

The Executive Committee. 

The three members who comprise 
this Committee and have charge of 
what is known as the business arm 
of the order have exercised their cus- 
tomary diligence in caring for and 
improving the conditions that sur- 
round the business life of the State 
Grange. Their task is not an easy one 



and the changing business conditions 
in the commercial world require that 
these members shall be alert to grasp^ 
business opportunities. During the 
year some contracts have been can- 
celled wliile in the making of certain 
new ones they have departed some- 
what from the principle upon which. 
Qontracts have been previously made. 
It will be remembered by all that the- 
King of Italy invited the various gov- 
ernments of the world to participate- 
in an International Agricultural Con- 
gress with a view to determining upon 
the advisability of establishing an In- 
ternational Agricultural Institute. The 
United State government accepted the 
invitation to be represented. Feeling 
that this was a movement tending lo 
elevate and dignify agriculture and 
having a desire to acquire broader 
views myself in order that I might 
render better service to the Grange or- 
ganization in Pennsylvania, I advised 
the Executive Committee of my deter- 
mination to attend this Congress. The 
Committee at once honored me with 
a commission empowering me to rep- 
resent the Pennsylvania State Grange 
upcTh that occasion, with the distinct 
understanding that no expense what- 
ever should attach to the Grange in 
connection with its representation. 

The next morning after arriving at 
Rome I called to pay my respects to 
the Ambassador from the United 
States to Italy. To my surprise he 
handed me a commission from Wash- 
ington which designated me an ac- 
credited representative of the United 
States in this Congress. During the 
two weeks of the Congress I attended 
every session and made the personal 
acquaintance of the one hundred and 
twenty men who constituted the body 
and represented forty-two govern- 
ments. All the large powers of the 
world had their delegates here, and 
there seemed to be a united sentiment 
that agriculture stood in need of a 
larger recognition and of more help 
from the governments. Many of the 
men there were recognized powers in 
the realm of agriculture and their 
earnestness of purpose, sincerity of 
heart and the power reposed in them 
by their respective home governments 
were all united into a common pur- 
pose and that was to realize from thfe 
initiative the greatest possible good 
to agriculture everywhere. As the 
first suggestion for this movement had 
come from the United States from the 
fertile brain of Bro. David Lubin, a 
member of the Grange in California^ 
European powers were disposed to 
look with distrust upon the proposi- 
tion, believing that the United States 
would reap more benefit from it 
than it was possible for any other 
country to secure. This supposition 
had to be met and the representatives 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



of other countries had to be led to see 
that the basic principle of the move- 
ment was that the greatest good might 
come to the greatest number. The 
time is here when the farmer must 
know what his competitor is doing 
in all parts of the world. Depart- 
ments of agriculture make an effort 
to secure prompt and trustworthy in- 
formation for the farmers but in sev- 
eral countries there are no organized 
departments of agriculture or similar 
institutions from which our depart- 
■ ment can receive and exchange infor- 
mation and data. The public does not 
have and never has had a completely 
organized system between all coun- 
tries for the communication of intelli- 
gence as to the condition of crops, 
their yield, and their distribution. The 
stock gambler, however, has his pri- 
vate and high-priced agents "scouring 
all portions of the world to get this 
advance information and he receives 
his pointers almost instantly over the 
telephone and telegraph wire and 
even through space without the aid of 
wires. Private interests of less than 
a tithe the importance of agriculture 
have thoroughly organized systems for 
the transmission of intelligence from 
all parts of the world effecting in any 
way their welfare. 

There is not a week in the year but 
that wheat is being sown in some part 
of the world and were farmers advised 
as to the yield as indicated by the 
acreage and condition elsewhere they 
could more intelligently regulate the 
acreage which it was advisable to de- 
vote to that crop in a given year. 
Such an Institute would be invaluable 
in rendering aid to our departments 
of Agriculture in State and Nation, 
and in securing information and data, 
some of which is now gotten at very 
great expense and a part is never ob- 
tained at all. The interests of the 
general public are greater than the 
welfare of any trust or set of stock 
gamblers and the United States should 
continue to be a participant in the 
work of the International Institute of 
Agriculture. It is believed that the 
Institute will ultimately prove to be 
a strong block in the. path of the un- 
fair manipulator of prices for the 
staple products of agriculture. The 
cost to our government for adequate 
representation will be very light, 
ranging around $9,800 per year. 

Tjegislative Work. 

Pennsylvania in her capacity as a 
State inherited immense material re- 
sources but her dearest heirloom has 
ever been the possession of noble pur- 
poses and high ambitions; of honest 
dealings and abiding love for God 
and our fellowman. But there came 
a. time when the grafter sneaked In, 



when the debaucher of manhood and 
of good morals rapped at the door. of 
our homes and too often found lodg- 
ment. A time came when the thug 
defeated at the polls throughout the 
State the accomplishment of the will 
of the honest voter. Thru all the 
years of trial and scourging the 
Grange stool untarnished. It pointed 
the way to redemption and with voice, 
pen and vote indicated the method for 
realizing freedom. An awakened con- 
science on the part of a great ma- 
jority of our six and a quarter millions 
of people finally asserted itself and 
decency is again enthroned. The Lib- 
erty Bell was once more loosed and 
from its resting place in old Inde- 
pendejice Hall pealed forth as it had 
done in that crucial struggle of earlier 
days, "Freedom is yours! Grasp it! 
Use it!" 

The descendants and heirs of Wil- 
liam Penn are worthy of their heri- 
tage. The Grange rejoices. The en- 
tire country applauds. While it illy 
becomes me to attrobute victory to 
Grange influence too largely yet the 
unbiased historian of the future will 
point out the Grange as the strongest 
persistent and consistent factor in the 
generation of that sentiment and in 
providing to men that equipment which 
shows them their power and enables 
them to ultimately make right, hon- 
esty and decency supreme. 

The recent discussion and agitation 
in this State brings out more clearly 
than before the correctness of the 
position of the Grange on some im- 
portant State matters. I am clearly 
of the opinion that had the demands 
of our order been respected by the 
Legislature that the existing dissatis- 
faction would never have material- 
ized. For years the Grange has con- 
tended for greater equality in taxation 
and at the last two sessions of the 
Legislature we endeavored to have a 
larger proportion of the personal 
property tax and license taxes re- 
turned to the counties in which they 
originated. This would relieve local 
taxation to that extent. The Grange 
has also endeavored to have a larger 
share of the burdens of government 
placed upon corporate and personal 
property which now bears an average 
of about three mills while real estate 
pays more than five times as much. 
The principle is wrong in 'having so 
large a sum of money in the State 
treasury while the public .schools wait 
for their apropriation and the public 
roads so badly need the benefits of 
this money. 

The schools and roads are public 
institutions, both of which can be 
bettered by more liberal State appro- 



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L'M- 



PENNiSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



I 



priations. It is my conviction that 
the State roads under present policy 
are costing too much per mile. It ig 
possible to pay too much for any good 
thing regardless of the good it may 
be. And if the sentiment is once en- 
gendered that there is recklessness or 
extravagance or even poor judgment 
used in the administration of our new 
road law public sentiment may be 
turned against the law. 

The work of the Legislative Com- 
mittee will be submitted to this body 
later in detail and at this time I shall 
make but a few general comments 
upon the conditions prevailing in this 
State. The Legislature was in session 
last winter and your Committee made 
an earnest effort to have the Legisla- 
tion endorsed by this body en- 
acted into a law The Secre- 
tary of the Committee, Bro. Creasy, 
being a member of the Legislature 
and in touch at all times with its work 
called the other two members of the 
Committee, Bro. Dorsett, of Tioga 
County, and the State Master to Har- 
risburg at such times as the presence 
of the full Committee seemed to be 
desirable. Bills were introduced to 
the Legislature on tax, road and all 
questions which t"he State Grange had 
instructed the Committee to advocate. 
The thought of the members of the 
Legislature seemed as usual to be de- 
voted more to caring for other inter- 
ests than the interests of agriculture 
in this State, but Pennsylvania has 
had an awakening. From the top of 
the high mountain of indignation the 
people have dropped the verdict that 
they yet possess the power to rule 
Pennsylvania and propose to be heard. 
Their voice was heard and in response 
to the public sentiment so clearly ex- 
pressed. His Excellency, the Governor 
of the Commonwealth, has issued a 
call convening the Legislature in spe- 
cial session to act upon certain mat- 
terss which are indicated in his 
proclamation. 

New courage should come to us at 
this time as an organization and in 
clear unmistakable language we 
should set forth with unusual care the 
position of the Grange on matters of 
legislation effecting the agricultural 
interests of the State. There should 
be no uncertain sound in our decla- 
rations upon the tax question and the 
qualities that obtain in the assess- 
ment and collection of the revenues 
that support the -various forms of 
government within the Common- 
wealth. "We should guard with jeal- 
ous care the great diary interests of 
this State and should insist that our 
present law be made as efficient as 
possible for the protection of every 



citizen against machinations of the 
oleo combine. In support of the in- 
terests of the general public the 
Grange has constantly advocated the 
passage of more stringent National 
Pure Food Laws. The matter of giv- 
ing to trolleys the right of carrying 
freight and express matter in this 
State is also a live issue and by a 
sort of common consent the leader- 
ship in this fight also has been given 
over to the Grange organization. We 
accept the position and sound the 
tocsin for a general rally all along the 
line. Our State Grange has taken 
progressive positions in securing leg- 
islation in behalf of farm interests 
and the measures we are championing 
are endorsed by farmers generally and 
by the leading thinkers of the State. 
We are strengthening our organiza- 
tion by such work and are having 
Legislative Committees appointed in 
each Subordinate and Pomona Grange 
to co-operate with the State Grange 
Legislative Committee. 

Forestry. 

Each passing year brings into 
greater prominence the mistakes we 
have made in the wanton destruction 
of our timber. The class of people 
who have membership in this organi- 
zation can do much to correct these 
mistakes. Let every farmer who has 
a wood lot on his f^rm guard it jeal- 
ously and preserve it as a sacred her- 
itage to hand down to his children. 
Let us .create a sentiment to make it 
a disgrace for any farmer who has a 
farm of ordinary size to be without 
a wood lot. Let ^:s insist that the 
State shall severely punisTi through 
our various courts any corporation 
and any individual that shall be the 
cause of killing young timber through 
the agency of fire or carelessness of 
any sort. Let us encourage the growth 
of timber upon the thousands and 
thousands of acres of barren hillsides 
and mountain land in this State. In 
but few directions can Grange influ- 
ence be exercised that will be of more 
lasting benefit or reflect more credit 
upon the order than right along this 
line. 

Special Recommendation. 

I commend to the State Grange 
for its support, the position of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt in his effort to have 
larger power — for the adjustment of 
freight rates — ^conferred upon the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission. He 
says, "The Interstate Cqmmerce Com- 
mission should be vested with power 
where a given rate has been chal- 
lengeci, and after full hearing found 



9 



.V ■*: 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



to be unreasonable, to decide subject 
to judicial review what shall be a rea- 
sonable rate to take its place, tTie 
ruling of the Commission to take ef- 
fect immediately and to obtain unless 
and until it is reversed by a court of 
review." 

This has long- been a contention of 
the Grange. The policy of the Presi- 
dent for a "square deal" between man 
and man is given a clear expression 
in the above. The State Grange will 
do well to support this courageous 
and progressive leader of men in his 
advocacy of a measure which ig so 
clearly in the interest of public policy. 
It is furthermore a measure of special 
importance to agriculture as the 
farms furnish more of tlie freight 
tonnage than all other interests com- 
bined. Let us let our members of 
Congress and of the United States 
Senate know our position and that we 
expect to know what their actions and 
votes on this measure shall be. 

Tlie Farmer a Business Man. 

The recent developments in the 
reckless handling of the people's 
money by large life insurance com- 
panies of this country surely presents 
a revolting spectacle. Perhaps no 
more perfect type of graft has been 
held up to view than that which is 
furnished us in the management of 
these large corporations. A confiding 
public occupied with its own affairs, 
apparently glad to be relieved of wor- 
riment has annually been depositing 
millions of its earnings with these life 
insurance companies. Now that the 
public is aware of some of the rot- 
tenness of the insurance institutions, 
condemnation is heard on every hand. 
It ofttimes takes severe punishment to 
bring us to our senses, as we like to 
fololw in the well-beaten road, the 
least possible exertion being required 
there. We will submit to being robbed 
of a large portion of our earnings 
when it is done in an affable manner 
and the collections tTiat are taken 
from us are not great enough tn cause 
serious discomfort. Put the limit of 
endurance is sometimes overstepped 
as in this instance and we cast about 
to find new paths that are not haunted 
by the professional highwayman or 
the more sneaking grafter. 

The principle of sending our 
moneys out from a comunity and get- 
ting practically nothing in return for 
a period of years, if ever, is conducive 
to community poverty. Money invest- 
ed in an article that can serve a use- 
ful purpose such as adding to home 
comforts, or increasing the happiness 
of life, serves as a>i investment that 
brings with it a fair reward. When a 



farmer purchases an implement he- 
does so with the expectation that it 
will increase hig earning capacity and 
bring back to him its cost value and 
something besides, but when he de- 
posits his money with a bank at the 
county seat or some otTier center or 
sends it to a metropolis as a deposit 
in exchange for insurance receipts he 
is left for a longer or shorter period" 
without the use of that money or any 
equivalent for it. Take all such de- 
posits in the aggregate as^ made by 
farmers and you have an immense 
sum of money that is given over to- 
be used and handled by other people. 
They handle it primarily in their own 
interest. If the local banks pay any- 
thing at all in the way of interest for 
deposits left with them for specified 
periods of time that interest is but 
small. They do not keep this money 
in their vaults as they in turn must 
put it out intending to make enough 
off of it to pay interest and a profit 
besides to the bank. In the aggre- 
gate large amounts of this money of 
yours ultimately reaches Wall Street 
and with your other money that you 
have sent for life and fire insurance 
purposes to tlie metropolis is used to 
finance trusts. You have thus helped 
to create and to form the very agency 
which in turn says how much you 
shall be paid for your staple' products 
and how much you shall pay for the 
products you have to buy. The oil 
trust, the beef trust, the harvester 
trust are examples of the forces for 
which we have been furnishing the 
sinews of war and who turn upon us 
the weapons with which we have pro- 
vided them. As knowledge is power 
So money is power and when it is im- 
properly massed and tyranically used 
we have abundant proof tbat "money, 
is the root of all evil." Let it be kept 
in the localities Avhore it originates. 
Let it be put to profitable use there 
in upbuilding the interests of your re- 
spective ^ communities. 

To do this it is essential that we have 
our own banks and they administered 
and safeguarded by precautions nec- 
essary for absolute safety of the 
moneys of depositors and sharehold- 
ers. The concentration of the wealth 
of a country into the hands of the few 
has always led to docay. The creation 
of wealth comes from the many as 
they apply toil to the brow soil. This 
wealth, this money, is at one time in 
the hands of the producers. If com- 
petent to produce it, why not assert 
your competency to retain It for the 
use and enjoyment of yourselves, your 
own families and communities. That 
the farmers of the United States have 
something to put in banks and to do 



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10 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



. ■} 



business on is shown by the statistics 
recently put out by Secretary Wilson 
of the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The products of the 
farmers of the United States for the 
last year amount to over $6,400,000,- 
000. These products for this year 
would pay off the National debt six 
times over. His wheat amounts to 
$525,000,000; oats, $282,000,000; po- 
tatoes, $138,000,000. His milk pails 
have turned out products worth $625, 
000,000. Poultry added $500,000,000 
to the larder. Beef cattle have helped 
to keep the wolf from the door to the 
extent of $662,000,000, while sheep 
and swine provided $283,000,000 for 
pin money. We laud the iron and steel 
industries of the United States for 
their immensity but yet the dairy and 
poultry products alone are of greater 
value. Hay to the amount of $605,- 
000,000 was grown, while King corn 
holds Tiis place as monarch by reason 
of the $1,216,000,000 added by that 
product in a single year. The farm- 
ers assets are based upon twenty bil- 
lions of dollars worth of land which 
has enabled them to produce this har- 
vest of a value that is incomprehen- 
sible. When the wealth of the farm- 
ers of the State is aggregated it foots 
up to an immense sum of money. 
Whenever banks are organized some 
competent person is employed to act 
as cashier. Individual members of 
the Grange should consider the pro- 
priety of establishing at least one 
bank in their county as INationa 
banks may now be established on a 
capital stock of $25,000. The shares 
of stock ought to made low enough 
so that members of the Grange in all 
parts of the county who desire to take 
stock need not be deprived from so 
doing. It is advisablo that the largest 
possible number of shareholders be 
secured for each bank organized and 
as banking by mail has become so 
popular and easy, distance from the 
location of the bank need not operate 
against any one taking stock or using 
the bank as a depository. It may be 
remembered that some years ago in 
my annual address I advocated the 
larger use of banks by farmers on the 
ground that the payment of obliga- 
tions by checks was a good safeguard, 
gave the farmer a better business 
standing and also developed him in 
knowledge of business methods. I 
now recommend to you the propriety 
of being a part of the bank institution 
yourself, of participating in its man- 
agement and the management of your 
own funds and I do so in the belief 
that the proposition is entirely prac- 
tical and feasible. I make this rec- 
ommendation also from another point 



of view beside the pecuniary advan- 
tage which it may be to the Individual 
member. It will have a wholesome 
influence in many ways. The moral 
effect upon the young people, the pos- 
sible improvement of home and home 
conditions because of having the'com- 
munity money wit? in the commuity. 
The farmer's son will look forward 
to fitting himself t-> occupy a posi- 
tion in the bank, in the works, or 
grain elevator or some other needed 
local institution which will follow log- 
ically when you have the use and con- 
trol of your own moneys. There are 
here possibilities and opportunities 
for the organized farmers of this 
State. Our members have the devel- 
opment that has come by reason of 
the drill, the discipline and the ad- 
vantages of organization. These 
forces should be used through the 
Grange in every legitimate way to the 
end that Patrons may receive the 
largest possible amount of good from 
co-operative effort intelligently di- 
rected. 

Rural Education. 

The subject of rural education is 
of interest to people everywhere but 
desire for its improvement appeals 
with special force to the members of 
our order. Every close observer of 
existing conditions knows that the 
cities of our State and country are 
hot-houses for idleness, weakness and 
corrupton. The intellectual capacity 
for directing large enterprises and 
niovements is in nine instances out of 
ten country bred and nurtured. The 
physical ability TO DO comes from the 
touch of Nature and from the breath- 
ing of the free and pure air of the 
open country. Heaven's sunlight and 
the close comunion of Nature have 
enabled many men to be strong 
against temptation and to lead lives 
filled with morality and righteousness. 
Surrounded by conditions favorable to 
right living and to the development 
of all that God intended man to pos- 
sess we are brought face to face with 
the problem of making the best of 
our opportunities in the mental and 
physical development of our children. 
Statesmen and legislators of Pennsyl- 
vania should not !,olace themselves 
with the belief that they have done 
full duty to the Commonwealth when 
they have legislated for Philadelphia 
and Pittsburg and for the manufaict- 
uring and corporate interests of the 
State. All sections and all large In- 
terests of the State should always 
have fair consideration both in the 
giving out of honors*. In the placing 
of responsibilities and In the dis- 
tribution of the tax-bearing burdens. 



11 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



Of our pupils in the various schools 
of Pennsylvania it is fair to conclude 
that 25 per cent, or 300,000 of them 
come from our 224,248 farms and re- 
lated country homes in this State. 
This large army of .school children has 
represented in it such immense possi- 
bilities that I dare not undertake to 
enumerate them. Their development 
of mind, body and soul, yea, even 
their future destinies are in the hands 
of the governing body politic of to- 
day. Is it doing the best that may be 
done for these citizens of the future ? 
Are their hearts being developed, their 
hands being trained, and their minds 
being fitted for the doing of those 
things, be they commonplace or large, 
which they will soon be called upon 
to do ? Are they impressed at home 
with the policy of the Golden Rule or 
in more modern terms, with the prin- 
ciple of a square deal between man 
and man, and so are they being fitted 
to inherit and use properly the gov- 
erning power which is yet to come 
to them ? For the governing power 
of this State and Union will be vested 
then, as it is now and ever has been, in 
that class of men which comes near- 
est to the attainment of the ideal type 
of manhood. To this end it is the 
right of your children to aspire. . It 
is your duty to hold up before them 
an ideal in life no less high than this. 
The problems of government in their 
last analysis come to you for solution. 
The Grange is fitting you to meet 
these demands and is urging you to 
see to it that your children are in turn 
still better qualified to grapple with 
and to solve the more intensive and 
complicated problems which the ex- 
igencies of our civilization are con- 
stantly producing. The mission of 
our order is therefore not alone to 
entertain for a season, not alone to 
make you as an individual more in- 
dependent in the business world, not 
alone to make you more successful in 
your vocation, but it would also have 
you understand the greatness of being 
a MAN, a unit, a factor in a govern- 
ment of, for and by free men. While 
not a sectarian religious organization 
yet its teachings should result in 
creating in the hearts of the member- 
ship a full determination to be found 
on the side of right against wrong, on 
the side of temperance as against dis- 
sipation, on the side of peace as 
against war. The movement for hu- 
man betterment is an open movement. 
Every person may contribute to it. 
No better or more lasting contribution 
can be made than may be given 
through a broader and better educa- 
tion of the growinf^ children in rural 
communities. 



A number of State forces are avail- 
able and are contributing materially 
to the sum total of human knowledge. 
The division of Farmers' Institutes, 
of Dairy and Food and of Economic 
Zo-ology are doing splendid work in 
their respective fields. The circulat- 
ing library plan as provided by our 
State is full of possibilities and every 
Grange should acquaint itself with 
this work. An inquiry addressed to 
State Library, Harrisburg, Pa., will 
bring you full information. The State 
College and Experiment Station is an- 
other institution of public character 
where tuition is free to all citizens of 
this State. It has an ideal location 
in the very center of the State and 
with as fine soil and climate for ex- 
perimental purposes as are to be Tiad 
any place. It is to be regretted that 
the management of this institution 
has been so tardy in providing in- 
structors and courses of study here 
that would be satisfactory to the farm 
interests of this State. The federal 
and State governments have a right 
to expect that it shall teach agricul- 
ture as well as the mechanic arts. In 
the act of Congress which practically 
created this Institution in its present 
form and which reuires it to teach 
"agriculture and mechanic arts," ag- 
riculture was mentioned first. But 
in the actual workings of the College 
it has been the thing last thought of. 
This is not fair to the farmers of this 
State. It is not fair to the State and 
Federal governments that are expect- 
ed to contribute money for the institu- 
tion on the above basis. We have been 
promised more consideration and in 
the hope of realizing it I have for 
years personally and officially upheld 
the institution. But the progress in 
our direction is exasperatingly slow. 
Agriculture must have fair considera- 
tion in its teaching forces, in its 
courses of study, in the q"uality and 
breeding of the live stock there. This 
can be accorded to it without lowering 
in any way, the high standards of the 
other departments of work now car- 
ried on at the College. 

In Conclusion. 

And now, Fellow Patrons, the work 
of this session is open before us. 
Let us buckle on the armor and enter 
upon its discharge courageously. Dis- 
cuss all matters fully and fairly, then 
when the vote has been taken and 
the decision of the majority is regis- 
tered on any given proposition, let 
us then look upon it as being the 
sentiment of this entire body. And 
when the meeting has closed and we 
repair to our respective communities, 



12 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



let each and every one consider it 
an honor and a duty to help carry for- 
ward the plans that may be outlined 
at this meeting and to advance In 
every possible way the aims and pur- 
poses of our beloved order. Let us 
familiarize ourselves with the founda- 



tion principles that enter into the 
platform of our organization and let 
us be so devoted in our fidelity to 
them at all times and under all cir- 
cumstances as to become distin- 
guished for keeping ourselves "un- 
spotted from the world." 



Grange then took a recess until 2 o'clock p. m. 



TUESDA Y AFTERNOON 

Grange was called to order promptly by the Worthy Master and the fol- 
lowing committees announced : 

CREDENTIALS. 

H. Roblyer, No. 384 Tioga County; Mrs. Laura Litchard, 65 Montour; 
James Farabaugh, 1126 Cambria. 

EDUCATION. 

John A. MoSparran, No. 66 Lancaster; O. C. Tingley, 289 Susquehanna; 
James S. Campbell, 108 QatUljahia; Prof. Daniel Eberly, 810 York; Mrs. D. A. 
Tressler, 626 Perry. ■» 

AGRICULTURE. 

R. J. Weld, 874 Warren; W. H. Meredith, 629 Elk; Mrs. S. S. Blyholder, 
549 Armstrong; Mrs. Jos. Seyler, 964 Clearfield. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Hon. Hampton W, Rice, 451 Bucks; Thompson Ling, 531 Bedford; H. H. 
Brown, 31 Columbia; Mrs. Otto Marker, 1143 Warren; Harrison Straw, 1146 
Clearfield; E. L. McNett, 454 Lycoming. 

DORMANT GRANGES 
Thomas Hurst, 997 Erie; H. S. Wertz, 1154 Blair; Mrs. J. T. Prampton, 
654 Clarion; Henry Moyer, 168 Crawford. 

TRANSPORTATION. 

F. Leonard Reber, 29 Berks; Chas. A. Sisk, 1245 Wyoming; Mrs. B. P. 
Dannehower, 760 Montgomery; Mrs. Horace Smith, 507 Bucks; R. N. H. 
Boal, 1131 Venango. 

POMONA GRANGES. 

D. D. Coleman, 889 Blair; Mrs. Archie Billings, 947 Erie; Mrs. Amor 
Bullers, 609 Jefferson; H. G. DeLong, 812 Luzerne; N. B. Shaffer, 96 Centre. 

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE. 

Prof. L. E. Boyer, 914 Huntingdon; Hon. E. G. Rogers, 976^ Sullivan; J. P. 
Gifford, 385 Erie; Frank Morrow, 215 Lackawana; Jackson Grove, 119 Hunt- 
ingdon. 

FRUIT AND HONEY INTERESTS. 

Dr. H. A. Surface, 157 Centre; A. B. Kirsh, 1121 Cambria; B. D. Snyder, 
246 Susquehanna; Miss Laura Ehrgott, 764 Crawford; Mrs. E. Day, 1190 
McKean. 

DAIRY INTERESTS. 

J. G. Phelps, 502 Crawford; H. H. Hall, 1204 Potter; P. L. Rugglei, 819 
Luzerne; Mrs. A. S. Worden, 1183 Potter; Mrs. R. S. Hartley, 407 Warren. 

JUVENILE GRANGES. ' 

Mrs. Anna Baker, 1246 Potter; Mrs. P. P. Porsythe, 418 Susquehana; 
Mrs. L. S. Tyler, 178 Bradford; P. S. Holmes, 1212 MoKean; C. P. Reinsel. 
563 Clai^lon. 

GOOD OP THE ORDER. 

^.««^^- Kingsley, 918 Tioga; T. L. Passmore, 63 Chester; Isaac J. Hugrhea. 
1123 Cambria; Mrs. L. K. Dale, 109 Centre; Mrs. G. H. Nicklin, 393 Mercer. 



13 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



GRIEVANCES. 
A. H. Olmstead, 263 Warren; J. H. Wingert, 4 34 Union; J. B. Bricker, 
1105 Butler; Mrs. A. M. Anderson, 567 Luzerne; Mrs. Cyrus P. Carr, 1145 
Clearfield 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS. 

F. P. Willitts, 1141 Delaware; Jacob Womeldorf, 1264 Jefferson; E. J. C. 
Grotzinger, 1155 Elk; L. C. Kahler, 27 Lycoming; Mrs. M. J. Welch, 1237 
McKean. 

CO-OPERATION. 

Herman Dishart, 1165 Cambria; L. Winship, 1029 Lackawana; C. P. 
Shaw, 83 Bradford; Mrs. M. Carr, 957 Tioga; W. J. Pickering, 865 North- 
umberland. 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY. 

Mrs. J. J. Brunges, 209 Wyoming; Mrs. Fred. VanDusen, 817 Tioga; Mrs. 
G. A. Post, 1198 Lackawana; George Erk, 1089 Wayne; L. B. Geiger, 869 
Lehigh. 

The following committee on Master's address was appointed by fhe 
Worthy Overseer, Hon. A. C. Barrett : 

H, C. Demming, 42 Dauphin; M. N. Clark, 848 Westmoreland; Miss 
Josephene Roberts, 121 Chester; Mrs. V. B. Holiday, 1009 Tioga; Mrs. Clara 
Cole, 988 Crawford; R. S. Searle, 74 Susquehanna. 

The roll of counties was then called for the introduction of resolutions 
for reference without debate. 

Resolutions were received and referred as follows : 

Taxation, by Centre County Pomona Grange — Legislative Committee. 

Fees and Dues, 96 Centre — Constitution and By-Laws. 

Experiment Station, 1272 Centre — Agriculture. 

Rural Telephones, Centre County Pomona — Legislation. 

Federation of Pomona Granges, Centre County Pomona — Good of the 
Order. 

Changes of Election Laws, No. 63 Chester — Legislation. 

Change in date of election in Subordinate Granges, Clarion County Po- 
mona — Good of the Order. 

Place for next meeting, Crawford County Pomona — Executive Committee. 

Pomona representation in State Grange, Cr&wford County Pomona — Good 
of tlie Order. 

Centralization of Public Schools, Crawford County — Education. 

Special Dairy and Food Agent for Eirie County, Erie Pomona — ^Legjlslation. 

Grange Banks, Sullivan No. 976 — iCo-operation. 

Pomona representation in State Grange, Chester and Delaware Pomona — 
Good of the Order. 

Repeal Compulsory Vaccination, Susquehanna Ponaona — Legislation. 

Repeal Compulsory Vaccination, Warren Pomona — Legislation. 

Creation of Department of Horticulture, Dr. H. A. Surface — Fruit and 
Honey. 

Fraud in Fruit Trees, Dr. H. A. Surface — Legislation. 

More Ceremony in Grange Meetings, George R.North — Good of the Order. 

Worthy Overseer, Hon A. C. Barrett, presented his annual report. : 
Worthy Master and Patrons : 

Since our last State meeting another year with its reverses and successes 
has past, and we are again assembled to review our work, and plan for the 
future. It gives me added pleasure in making this report, that we are better 
known and more appreciated than ever before, and not a f w assembled "here 
can justly claim that they are true philanthropists and benefactors of the 
agricultural world. 

The Grange, as an educator, promoter, and developer, cannot be over- 
estimated in fitting its members for general usefulness, but we have not made 



'! 



i 



14 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



i 



^ 



i 



3 

I 
1 



the progress in the acquisition of membership that I had anticipated for the 
year 1905. I had predicted we would add ten thousand members to tlie 
Grange in the Keystone State, and I believe it possible to do that and more 
in the year 1906. 

Now, as Overseer of the Penn'a. State Grange, I will offer some sug- 
gestions along the lines of organization. I would suggest that the State Grange 
appropriate two or three thousand dollars for special deputy work to organize 
new Granges. I notice in looking over the 1905 Register, there is an ample 
field for this work. There are 19 counties with less tlian 10 Granges, 8 with 
less than 5, 10 with only one Grange and 8 with none. Adams County, with 
a population of over 34,000, Greene over 28,000, Lawrence over 57,000, Leb- 
anon 54,000, Monroe 21,000, have no Grange organization to their credit, and 
many of our strongest and wealthiest agricultural counties are only credited 
with one, viz : Lancaster, Dauphin, Beaver and Franklin; and many more 
witb only one to five. I notice only two counties have thirty or over; four 
with twenty or over. I also with pleasure and pride observe that Susque- 
hanna County with 29 Subordinate Granges, is a close third in the list, yi^th 
tw(p 1905 (State Banners to her credit, and an aggregate membership of 
nearly three thousand; but while I feel enthused over the successes in por- 
tions of our State, I deplore the conditions in the unorganized districts, and 
would recommend the employment of a corps of skillful deputies to go into 
these unorganized portions of the State and if necessary, make a house to 
house canvass, I have never known of a skillfully conducted canvass of this 
kind that was not productive of good results. I would suggest that the State 
Master, Secretary, Lecturer and Executive Committee arrange and dirisct this 
work. In manj-^ sections of the State the fields are ripe and ready for the 
harvest, and with properly directed agressive work we should organize one 
hundred Granges in Pennsylvania in the ensuing year. This may sound vision- 
ary, but it can and should be done. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. C. BARRETT, Overseer. 

Report received and ordered to be published in the journal. 
Worthy Lecturer, A. M. Cornell, reported as follows : 

Worthy Master and Patrons of Pennsylvania in Sunbury assembled : 

Duties of this office have been continued largely the same as in the past, 
that of writing many personal letters as well as much for publication in the 
local, agricultural, and Grange press. 

Quantities of Grange printed matter Tiave been distributed through the 
mail, at Grange rallies and public meetings, and the many ways that have 
almost daily offered the opportunity to spread the principles of the 'order. 
The better it is understood, the more it is appreciated. 

In addition to this, during the twelve months since this body last met, 

from one to eighteen meetings have been addressed in each of the counties 

here named : Tioga, Bradford, Dauphin, Centre, Perry, Clearfield, Jefferson, 

Clarion, Erie, Susquehanna, Wayne, Montour, Crawford, Warren, Indiana, 

Potter, Luzerne, Schuylkill, McKean, Lackawanna, and Huntingdon. 

During this time, not one meeting promised to attend, has been missed 
or an expected train connection lost. 

Careful data have been kept from which the following is taken : Miles 
walked, ninety-eight; miles in sleigh and carriage, six hundred and twenty- 
seven; on one hundred and fifty-four different trains, five thousand eight 
hundred and five miles by rail; making an aggregate of six thousand five 
hundred and thirty miles traveled during the year, doing Grange work. 

Have spoken at ninety meetings with an aggregate estimated attendance of 
sixteen thousand three hundred and fifty-six persons present. The meetings 
are classified as follows : Twenty-eight private meetings, with an average 
attendance of fifty-six Patrons; sixty-two public meetings, with an average 
audience of two hundred and thirty eight. 

During this time many influential people of other callings have been met, 
in private and on the platform, such as ministers, teachers, physicians, a 
number of President Judges, and public officials of various rank, and a no- 
ticeable feature has been the universal expression of commendation they have 
had for the Grange and its achievements. 

And relative the association among the vast number of Patrons met, only 
those who are brouglit in close touch with them can realize the wonderful 
fraternal fellowship and kindly feeling this Order has established among the 
members of the Grange. It would seem that this is more and more in evidence 
as each year rolls into history. 



15 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL, SESSION OP THE 



i I 



I often wisli all could have the opportunity to see, feel and know the 
general devotion and even sacrifice existing among the membership for the 
Order and its principles, as witnessed in the experiences of a State Grange 
Lecturer. The present position of the Order along these lines is especially- 
gratifying, for it has ever been my continued desire, aim and effort, by act 
and precept, since occupying this offce to teach, first, fraternal fellowship; 
second, the importance of developing a high standard of character in the 
individual well fortified with a carefully trained and developed mind; third, 
.the need of a greater regard, acquaintance and compact relation among the 
agriculturist; fourth, concerted effort, on the many advantages man may de- 
rive through greater co-operation. 

As a traveling representative of this Order, a diligent student of the 
Grange, and conditions of society, the possibilities for good that may be at- 
tained by acting together impress me more forcefully day by day. 

As we look over the important age in which we live, the closing days 
of the fifth yeai: of the twentieth century, we can but see better and brighter 
days in store for'this Order, this country, and mankind, with the very atmos- 
phere permeated and perfumed with progress and reform, with the bright 
light of a better and higher manhood in all walks of life radiating from the 
chief executive of this great Nation, down through the avenues of the affairs 
of home and State, we can but rejoice as we hear the teachings and principles 
long taught by the Grange being proclaimed from high officials and the public 
press : "Protection for the weak, restraint upon the strong, justly distributed 
burdens and justly distributed power." 

Noting all this, I cannot refrain in closing, from commending in the high-- 
est terms, the past work of the Grange, congratulating the Order on the ex- 
alted position occupied to-day and imploring all members to stand steadfast 
and true for the great and responsible duties of the future in Faith^ in 
Hope, in Charity, with Fidelity — that the community, the county, the State, 
the Nation and the World in which we live, may become the better for our 
having lived in it. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. M. CORNELL. ' 



I 



-I 

i 



Report received and ordered to appear in the journal. 
The Worthy Steward, Theo. Kline, reported as follows 



Worthy Master and Members of the Penn'a. State Grange : 

Since the close of the last annual session until the opening of the pres- 
ent session, your steward has had no official duties to perform. But as your 
steward and servant it affords me pleasure to report that as far as my work 
goes, everything is in readiness for the proceedings of the thirty-third annual 
meeting. So if any work that you want done comes to me, I will do my best 
to accommodate you. It is gratifying to me to do what I can for the success 
of the meeting and your welfare and the good of the order. The year of 1905 
has nearly passed and the Grange fields have been thoroughly gleaned by 
our higher officials and our earnest working patrons. Yet I have done so little. 
But as a chosen deputy of my home county I have been striving to serve 
in that capacity. I have visited five domant Granges and four Pomona 
Granges and two new fields, 226 miles have been traveled on Grange work in 
my home county. I regret to say that there is not sufficient interest taken by 
the members of the order in our county or it should be organized better. For 
we meet men and women a great many of whom, were members of the Grange, 
but have taken demits or become unaffiliated simply because there seemed 
to be nothing of interest to them. Some say there was ai time when the 
Grange was a good place to go to. But I believe if those Granges had prac- 
ticed co-operation in selling and buying, and had aimed to have a good social 
time those people would have remained members and helped to bring in 
others and so strengthen the order, not only in their own town, but also in 
the State. 

It is not the large membership that is required to make them a success, 
but a way and means of interesting the members so as to secure their at- 
tendance and work, for each act Is like a link in a wonderful chain. So let 
us come and wisely council together, not so much about what has been done, 
but about what shall be done, and when we go home, carry with us not alone 
the thoughts of what ought to be done, but a determination to do everything 
in our power to make our home Grange a better, stronger means for good in 
the community, to our country and to mankind. One thing I desire to im- 
press on the minds of farmers that in order to secure such legislation and 



16 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANOB. 



1 



protection and advancement as we are entitled to and desire to have enacted, 

the farmer himself should be represented in all legislative bodies. 

m Therefore, we should unite together for the mutual protection one of the 

other. 

Fraternally submitted, 

THEODORE KLEIN. 

Report received and ordered to appear In the journal. 

The Worthy Treasurer, Hon. S. E. Nivin,- submitted his annual report : 

S. E. Nivin, Treasurer, in account with Penn'a. State Grange. 

DR. 

1904 Dec. 1 To Balance $13092.16 

Dec. 11 Interest 250.00 

Dec. 16 Erie Chamber of Commerce 200.00 

1905 Jan. 21 Ailman Sec 114.23 

Feb. 18 Ailman Sec 1000.00 

Mar. 15 Ailman Sec ; 1200.00- 

May 6 Ailman Sec 1000, 00- 

June 22 Ailman Sec 900.00- 

Aug. 1 Ailman Sec 1500.00' 

Sept.16 Ailman Sec 1500.00 

Oct. 24 Ailman Sec 1346.00 

Nov. 26 Ailman Sec 1856. 4T 

Nov. 28 Ailman Sec 1714.60 



1904 



Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


19 


Dec. 


28 


Dec. 


16 



i 




$25673.46 

CR. 

McEwen $ 2.00 

Hill 125.00 

Freeman 87.00 

Williammee 1.00 

Litchard 1.00 

Litchard 3.00 

Holiday 13.93:. 

Holiday 8.50> 

Seamans 7.00» 

Blyholder 9.55 

Dorsett 11.60 < 

Woodside 16.00 

Tyndall 14.00 - 

GrifHs 4.50 • 

McWilHams 124.87 

Rhone 19.2a 

Fisher 24.40 

Smith 60 

Chandler 44.66 

Woodside 9.00 

Moore 18.00 

Piollett 29.26 

Dildine 17.91 

Johnson 30.00 

Hall 26.20 

Hunsinger 23.00 

Oster ^ 54.94 

Pratt 27.4a 

Tucker 99.19^ 

Nivin 167.86: 

Lawrence .50. 

Griffith Printery 4.00. 

Curtis lO.Oa 

Barrett 32.0a 

Gooderham 84.0a 

Teagarden 10.72^ 

Oster 4.2a 

Chase 27.28 

Freesis Bros 6.00 

Mileage 5359.00 



17 



1905 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSI ON OF THE 

12 

Jan. 4 Stevens 40 

14 People's Register ^q 

Boston Regalia Co ,^g 

Burchfield 3* 

Dickey 2 

Bricker -j^* 

17 Fleisher 2 

18 Hobbs 2 

McClain o' 

20 Whitney rq" 

24 Hill ^1 

Public Opinion 2o 

Creasy 2 

Valley Spirit • -.or- 

25 Cornell o 

26 Bira 16 

2 7 Boring g 

Bryant .q 

28 Freeman g 

Small A 

Feb. 4 Mang „ 

Smythe Co J 

Buckley 

8 Lewis - 

9 Hobbs i 

10 Harrisburg Cycle Co ^ 

Ho wden „ ' 

Penn'a. Farmer Co • • • • ^^ 

11 Morris ^ 

18 Hicks • ^ Qjf 

Penn'a. State Grange • ■'■^^ 

Dorsett %l 

20 Oster ^* 

21 Griffith's Print ;» 

22 Ailman -^f Y 

Griffith's Print IJ 

Wickersham ^ 

Tritle II 

Mar. 20 Nat. Grange ^ J» 

Freeman Jj!^ 

22 Burchfield JJ2 

29 Hill 125 

Seiders J^ 

Apr. 4 Clark }] 

Hall 14 

" Wickersham 2 

8 Cornell 186 

Seamans * 

Griffith's Print 39 

Pomeroy 53 

11 Straw 4 

,27 Hill 215 

Penn'a Farmer a- 125 

May 4 Oster 36 

6 Ailman 225 

Seiders 9 

Dixon 7 

Dale 6 

13 Nat. Grange 344 

20 Freeman 90 

23 People's Register 98 

27 Chandler 16 

29 Small 10 

31 Boring 4 

Times Pub. Co 40 

June 3 Burchfield 27 

28 Thomas 168 

July 3 Armstrong 2 

17 Freeman 20 

Aug. 1 Freeman 50 

9 Hurst 8 



00 

35 

00 

75 

00 

00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.80 

.25 

.00 

.00 

.51 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

00 

.00 

.00 

.10 

.29 

00 

75 

.00 

00 

00 

00 

.00 

87 

21 

.40 

50 

.60 

.50 

.44 

.07 

.20 

50 

00 

75 

10 

78 

75 

.30 

.00 

.50 

.25 

.00 

.50 

.00 

.28 

.00 

35 

75 

.50 

.42 

00 

.30 

.94 

.75 

.75 

.15 

00 

00 

95 

92 

00 

45 



18 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



1904 
1905 



Dec. 
Dec. 



1904 Dec. 

1905 May 

Nov. 

Dec. 



23 
7 

11 
21 

30 
5 
9 

19 

20 

21 

30 

1 



22 



1 
1 



1 

9 

21 

27 
1 



Desmond ^ 3.00 

People's Register ." 62,00 

Hill 179.60 

Henrie 1-00 

Ailman 2.25 

Burohfield 31.50 

Nat. Grange 357.55 

Freeman 40.00 

Holiday 34.23 

Hill 28.35 

Lilley - 10.00 

Hill 162.50 

Harrisburg Typewriter Co 2.50 

Nat. Grange 376.37 

Johnson 18.24 

Burchfleld ■ 6.00 

Morris 14.51 

Hill 40.89 

Dixon 20.00 

Dorsett 3.00 

Ailman 225.00 

Ailman 243.16 

Wickersham 1.50 

$12210.70 

Balance $13092.16 

Receipts 12581.30 $25673.46 

Orders Paid $ 6851.70 

Orders Mileage 5359.00 

Balance 13462.76 $25673.46 

SURPLUS FUND. 

Oster Sec $746.34 

Oster Sec 28.71 

Oster Sec 250.00 

Oster Sec 200.00 

Oster Sec 43.00 $1268.11 



Fraternally submitted, 



S. E. NIVIN, Treasurer. 






i 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



Shoup and Wife 

Fife 

McElheny 

Leltch 

Blyholder and Wife 

Flemming 

Pence 

Ditty 

Shakely 

Crosby 

Pisons 

Rosenburg 

Koontz 

King 

Oster 

Dreibeldes 

Gates 

Henshey 

Stryker 

Leighty 

Aurandt 

Selwitz 

Coleman 

Moore and Wife 

Sullivan 

Snyder and Wife 



$13.80 


West 


6.10 


Wood 


6.75 


Heverley 


5.35 


Lane 


14.50 


Campbell 


6.15 


Drake and Wife 


6.95 


Coney 


7.15 


Soper and Wife 


6.00 


Fitzwater and Wife 


8.00 


Erandall and Wife 


6.90 


Statford and Wife 


6.10 


Benjamin 


14.80 


Avers 


13.20 


Varnoy and Wife 


15.30 


Palmer 


19.55 


Knecht and Wife 


14.50 


Johnson 


11.30 


Brickman and wife 


11.10 


Slack and Wife 


13.55 


Bricker 


14.50 


Leisie 


13.55 


Christie 


11.65 


Albert 


23.40 


MoCall and Wife 


9.15 


Brown 


20.75 


Ivory 



8.80 

8.60 

9.85 

9.00 

8.60 

18.80 

11.70 

22.60 

22.60 

23.30 

19.00 

12.55 

11.65 

22.%0 

22.50 

28.20 

30.00 

30.60 

29.40 

5.30 

5.45 

5.00 

4:60 

9.20 

14.55 

11.81 



19 



"' i 

f 



Ki 



THIRTY-THIRE 


► ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 




Douglass 


12.10 


Hughes 


13.70 


Sanker 


12.20 


Sherbine 


13.70 


Lieb 


13.15 


Thomas 


28.00 


Griffin and Wife 


24.12 


Hall and Wife 


2.60 


Ryan 


12.80 


Jones 


.75 


Farabaugh and Wife 


22.80 


Ross 


2.00 


Baver and Wife 


22.80 


Cole and Wife 


2.00 


Gates 


S.35 


Greenfield and Wife 


2.80 


Davis 


7.15 


Fulbon and Wife 


2.00^ 


Cyphert 


7.45 


Crooks 


1.40 


Krotzer and Wife 


13.40 


Wood and Wife 


4.30 


George 


6.85 


Harrington 


1.40 


McDowell 


7.50 


Brunot and Wife 


2.00 


McLain 


6.50 


Hazen 


.90 


Elliott 


5.25 


Scott 


4.30 


Thorpe and Wife 


14.10 


Wilsor;, and Wife 


2.50 


Diem and Wife 


14.10 


Gordon and Wife 


2.80 


St raw- 


13.50 


Graham 


1.00 


Dressier 


5.90 


Joijes and wife 


4.00 


Wachob and Wife 


11.80 


Utley and Wife 


3.30 


Owens and Wife 


12.80 


Shreve and Wife 


2.10 


Rowland 


12.65 


Greenfield and wife 


3.50 


McNaughton 


11.80 


Gates 


1.20 


Spackman 


15.50 


Dean and Wife 


1.50 


Carr and Wife 


13.50 


Seavy and Wife 


2.00 


Moore and Wife 


15.50 


Marshall 


1.70 


Brinton 


14.90 


Wilson 


2.50 


Mendenhall and Wife 


30.40 


Crecraft 


4.30 


Cox and Wife 


30.00 


Cooper and Wife 


2.80 


Powell 


14.30 


Messerall and Wife 


2.00 


Darlington and Wife 


28.90 


Hanna and Wife 


5.80 


Eberhart 


4.80 


Brenckman 


15.00 


Caxon 


1.40 


Keller 


10.70 


Prusic 


.95 


Dale 


10.40 


Borroughs and Wife 


27.00 


Hoss and Wife 


16.00 


Rockwell and Wife 


27.00 


Corl 


10.70 


Peters and Wife 


18.90 


Musser and Wife 


20.80. 


Rishel 


9.25 


Rishel 


10.95 


Baird 


8.95 


Dale and Wife 


20.70 


Shoemaker 


8.95 


Hoy and Wife 


20.90 


W. H. and Ella Welsh 


17.90 


Robb and Wife 


18.80 


McTague 


9.15 


Orr 


9.60 


Walker and Wife 


17.90 


Duck and Wife 


22.40 


Shoffer 


12.00 


Meyer and Wife 


22.40 


Parker 


11. 9S 


Ardrey and Wife 


20.80 


Karns and Wife 


27.70 


Morrison and Wife 


39.40 


Bershue and Wife 


27.10 


Hoopes 


32.80 


Suppee and Wife 


27.90 


Coates 


16.05 


Thomas 


13.95 


Wood and Wife 


32.60 


Kast and Wife 


27.90 


Hicks and Wife 


32.20 


Gardner 


5.80 


Thomas 


15.00 


Green and Wife 


11.60 


Baldwin 


15.50 


Kerner 


5.15 


Satterthwait 


15.05 


Reuscher 


5.15 


Chambers 


15.00 


Ramsey 


8.00 


Little 


17.15 


Gregory- 


5.10 


North and Wife 


32.20 


Brooks 


8.80 


Stever and Wife 


25.00 


Hutchinson 


8.80 


Wilson 


12.50 


Cooper 


7.75 


Orner and Wife 


23.20 


Rittenhouse 


8.15 


Hartsock 


11.60 


Hosteller 


11.30 


Grove 


16.35 


Swartz 


11.30 


Howitt 


11.90 


Mosher 


11.30 


Hudson 


16.35 


Rittenhouse 


12.20 


Wilson 


11.90 


Patterson 


10.80 


Stooer and Wife 


22.50 


Crapp 


4.00 


Groove 


12.60 


Wright and Wife 


25.00 


Drake 


17.05 


Mosser 


11.90 


McHenry 


9.60 


Liumodue 


13.00 


Harbinson and Wife 


16.80 


Hertizoy 


11.05 


Freese and Wife 


18.00 


Deithrick 


13.00 


Syphirt 


6.06 


Rowland 


12.95 


Deemer 


6.05 



20 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANaE. 



.; 



Womeldorf and Wife 


12.10 


Morris and Wife 


15.00 


Mayers and Wife 


15.30 


Allshouse 


6.70 


Johns 


7.15 


Allshouse 


6.70 


Goding and Wife 


12.90 


Keemer 


14.95 


Shearer 


15.35 


Sterrett 


13.85 


Brook 


18.30 


Hosteller 


13.85 


Hosteller 


13.85 


Hosteller 


13.95 


Hosteller 


13.95 


McClure and Wife 


28.90 


Whitney and Wife 


' 23.50 


Tiffany 


11.75 


Beisecker and Wife 


24.10 


Weldy and Wife 


24.70 


Williams and Wife 


24.70 


Geiger 


14.00 


Williams and Wife 


32.80 


Heisler 


11.85 


Snyder and Wife 


32.80 


Harmon 


.11.95 


Heister 


11.85 


Sutliff and Wife 


23.90 


Harris 


12.35 


Murray 


10.45 


Bull 


10.40 


Porter 


10.55 


Mcllvain and Wife 


22.50 


Sedam and Wife 


21.10 


Plummer and Wife 


10.90 


Beckwith 


11.90 


Lynch 


6.00 


Taylor 


5.70 


Hackett and Wife 


11.40 


Taylor 


5.70 


Welch and Wife 


12.50 


Shollenberger and Wife 


6.00 


Kaltenbaugh and wife 


6.10 


McBntire and Wife 


6.10 


Grute and Wife 


3.40 


Bond 


3.40 


Burnett 


2.20 


Doneliower 


14.65 


Merrell 


12.25 


Litchard and Wife 


22.40 


Mower and wife 


22.90 


Schnure 


11.00 


Litchard and Wife 


22.30 


Pickering and Wife 


24.50 


Moyer 


11.95 


Ellis 


10.40 


Walker and Wife 


.60 


'Sypher and Wife 


22.00 


Young and Wife 


1.00 


Hurst and Wife 


2.00 


Billings and Wife 


1.25 


Swap 


1.00 


Allen and Wife 


2.10 


Baker and Wife 


2.10 


Eagley and Wife 


1.80 


Gray and Wife 


1.40 


Taylor 


.60 


Perkins 


2.00 


Howard and Wife 


2.10 


Arters and Wife 


2.50 


Benninger 


14.00 


Smith and Wife 


26.80 



Depue 


13.80 


Renner and Wife 


29.00 


Ralfensperger 


14.60 


Pleisher 


14.80 


Burdic and Wife 


14.40 


Bertch and Wife 


17.10 


Pearsall 


7.15 


Johnston and Wife 


17.50 


Deisroth 


10.60 


Worden and Wife 


18.40 


Bartoo 


18.40 


Hopkins 


9.20 


Dingman 


10.85 


Lyman and Wife 


22.30 


Tauscher 


21.30 


Hall 


10.05 


Coleman 


12.62 


Shloener 


14.50 


Hummel 


16.75 


Dunkleberger 


16.75 


Reiser and Wife 


20.00 


Yonkin and Wife 


20.00 


Rogers 


11.30 


Bender and Wife 


22.20 


Rice and Wife 


21.10 


Whitney and Wife 


23.50 


Olmstead and Wife 


22.00 


Roberts and Wife 


22.00 


Pickett and Wife 


22.00 


Bell and Wife 


23.50 


Shay and Wife 


21.10 


Osterhout and Wife 


21.20 


Stoneburg ' 


3.00 


Donaldson 


3.00 


Walling 


3.00 


Hale and Wlf e 


6.40 


Reed and Wife 


15.80 


Cheeseman 


6.30 


Weygandt 


7.70 


Painter 


8.00 


Day 


7.70 


Holtzer 


6u80 


Clark 


7.10 


Ruth 


7.45 


Stroble and Wife 


15.60 


Sarver 


7.80 


Jennings and Wife 


22.70 


Bacon and Wife 


23.50 


Armstrong and Wife 


23.50 


Capwell 


10.00 


Minkler 


13.70 


Baker and Wife 


24.80 


Everson 


11.75 


Tingley 


10.90 


Lyons 


11.70 


Tanner 


11.75 


Hessner and Wife 


22.10 


Parker and Wife 


20.00 


Brion 


10.00 


Landon and Wife 


22.10 


Wilcox and Wife 


22.60 


Beiver and Wife 


18.50 


Shaw and Wife 


18.40 


Smith 


9.20 


Rexford and Wife 


18.40 


Copestiqk and wlf e . 


18.40 


Snoyer and Wife 


18.40 


Wilson and Wife 


18.40 


Everitt and Wife 


17.70 


Brant and Wife 


16.30 



21 



4 



THIRTY-THIRD 



Dorsett and Wife 

Williammee and Wife 

DeWtit and wife 

Curtiss and Wife 

Borden 

Thompson and Wife 

Merrick and Wife 

Hanscom 

Potter and Wife 

Scott and Wife 

Pride and Wife 

Seamens and Wife 

Knowlton and Wife 

Seeley and Wife 

Steele and Wife 

Teachman and Wife 

Bradley 

Boal and Wife 

Grler 

Wlngert and Wife 

Meyer 

Rude 

Blake and Wife 

Andrews 

Bowerer 

Bullock and Wife 

Kline and Wife 

Woodside and Wife 

Olmstead and Wife 

Report received and referred to the Finance Committee. 



ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 




18.40 


Cartwright 


2.35 


25.20 


Poole 


1.50 


24.80 


Schuler 


2.65 


18.4a 


Bentley and Wife 


7.00 


9.50 


Stewart and Wife 


5.30 


18.40 


Seavy 


3.15 


17.10 


Lyon and Wife 


5.30 


10.40 


Babcock and Wife 


4.60 


17.30 


Darling 


2.70 


17.10 


Barney and Wife 


5.30 


17.10 


Morgan 


2.65 


17.10 


Henning 


11.10 


19.00 


Hodgson 


11.75 


16.80 


Freeman and Wife 


22.70 


16.50 


Johnson 


10.00 


16.60 


Clark and Wife 


25.90 


2.60 


Remington and Wife 


22.00 


4.70 


Benson and Wife 


21.^0 


3.65 


Keller 


15.45 


82.50 


Newcomer and Wife 


30.70 


U.oo 


Brant and Wife 


25.10 


16.30 


Sheff 


10.00 


26.90 


Griffls and Wife 


26.60 


13.10 


Passinger and Wife 


20.00 


16.30 


Gay and Wife 


20.00 


26.90 


Moran 


14.00 


26.20 


Tingley and Wife 


21.90 


5.80 


Bush 


12.75 


3.00 


Young and Wife 


3.00 






The Worthy Secretary, J. T. Ailman, offered his annual report : 

Worthy Master and Fellow Patrons : 

It again becomes my duty and it is a pleasure no less to give fhe numer- 
ical results of another year of Grange work in the Keystone State. 

There are now 551 Granges on the books of the State Grange. Of these, 
506 are paid up in full to the close of the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1905; 16 
are in arrears for one quarter, 3 for two quarters, 10 for three quarters, 15 
for four quarters 1 for five quarters and 1 for seven quarters. 

For the quarter ending Dec. 31, 1904, 29,644 members were reported; 
983 were initiated, 215 reinstated, 651 dropped from the roll, making a net 
gain of 557 for the quarter. 

For the quarter ending March 31, 1905, 31,299 members were reported; 
1,433 were initiated, 276 reinstated, 507 dropped from the roll, making a net 
gain for the quarter of 1,155. 

For the quarter ending June 30, 1905, 32,851 members were reported; 
1,855 were initiated, 367 reinstated, 507 dropped from the roll, making a net 
gain of 1,715 for the quarter. 

The num'ber reported for the quarter ending Sept. 30, 1905, was 33,226; 
1,166 were initiated, 169 reinstated, 380 dropped from the roll, making a net 
gain for the quarter of 955.' 

The total initiations for the year were 5,440; reinstatements, 967; 
charter members of new and re-organized Granges, 612, making the total 
additions to the membership 7,019. From this, however, must be deducted 
the 2,082 members dropped from the roll, leaving a net gain of 4,937 for the 
year. 

Thirteen new Granges were organized as follows : v 

No. 1282, Franklin County, on Feb. 24, by W. F. Hill, with 17 charter 
members. 

24. 



1283, 
members. 

1284, 
members. 

1285, 
members. 

1286, 

1287, 
members. 



Clearfield County, on Feb. 
Centre County, on Feb. 



28, 



Clearfield County, on Mar. 16 



by Harrison Straw with 22 charter 

by John S. Dale with 28 charter 

by E. M. Davis with 41 charter 



McKean County, on April 6, by H. H. Hall with 18 charter members. 
Luzerne County, on March 23, by C. H. Dildine with 15 charter 



22 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



charter members^ 
with 1 3 charter 



1288, Potter County, April 19, by H. H. Hall, with 20 

1289, Potter County, April 26, by Gertie Nickerson 
members. 

1290, Jefferson County, May 15, by G. H. Small with 64 charter members:^ 

1291, Schuylkill County, by J. H. Dunkleberger with 23 charter members, 

1292, Schuylkill County, by J. H. Dunkleberger with 23 charter members. 

1293, Susquehanna County, by A. C. Barrett with 33 charter members. 

1294, Erie County, by Thomas Hurst, Dec. 8, 1905 with 26 charter 
members. 

Ten dormant Granges were re-organized, as follows : 

No. 90, Westmoreland County, Dec. 23, by themselves with 16 charter 
members. 

191, Snyder County, Dec. 21, by C. H. Dildine with 21 charter members. 

775, Lycoming County, Feb., by themselves with 14 charter members. 

107, Centre County, Feb. 18, by John S. Dale with 26 charter mem'bers. 

937, Tioga County, Feb. 7, by. themselves with 65 charter members. 

1171, Jefferson County, April 4, by G. H. Small with 44 charter members^ 

536, Luzerne County, April 5, by themselves with 13 charter members. 

1001, Huntingdon County, April 18, by W. T. Boring with 19 charter 
members. 

793, Westmoreland County, August 6, by J. R. Truxal with 21 charter 
members. 

85*2, Huntingdon County, Sept. 21, by W. T. Boring with 17 charter 
members. 

Marvin Grange, No. 1266, McKean County, consolidated with Fidelity- 
Grange, No. 1238, McKean County. 

Six Granges have become dormant. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Charter fee Pomona Grange No. 55, Schuylkill County $ lO.OO 

Rebate fare to State meeting, Erie 

A. A. Snyder and Wife 5.90 

J. W. Williams and Wife 5.90 

Fees and Dues. Delinquent Granges, 1904 ■ 273.35 

Fees and Dues for quarter ending Dec. 31, 1904 2507.27 

Fees and Dues for quarter ending March 31, 1905 2745.14 

Fees and Dues for quarter ending June 30, 1905 3244. 6T 

Fees and Dues for quarter ending Sept. 30, 1905 2559'.21 

Supplies sold 665.6? 

Total Receipts 12017.0T 

Orders were drawn on the Treasurer as follows : 

Mileage orders for State meeting, Erie $ 5349.00 

Mrs. Delia Hunsinger, L. A. S. State meeting 23.00 

E. M. Griffls, additional car fare 4.50 

D. B. McWilliams, Finance Committee 124.87 

Florence Rhone, Flora 19.20 

Mary M. Fisher, Pomona 24.40 

E. F. Smith, error mileage .60 

Mrs. V. B. Holiday, Ceres 13.93 

Mrs. V. B. Holiday (boarding) 8.50 

H. M. Gooderham, Steward 34.00 

Credentials Committee 27.00 

Louis Piolett, Executive Committee 29.26 

J. W. Johnson, Trio and Organist 30.00 

I .Frank Chandler, Executive Committee 44.66 

G. W. Oster, Executive Committee 54.94 

H. H. Pratt, Assistant Steward 27.40' 

W. R. Tucker, Committee Arrangements 99.19 

Mrs. Curtis, Organist 10. CO 

A. C. Barrett, Overseer 32.00 

H. G. Teagarden, Chaplain 10.72 

Wallace Chase, Gate Keeper 27. 2S 

Froess Bros., carting piano , 5.00 

W. E. Lawrence, moving trunks .50 

Total Expenses State Meeting $ 5999. 9S 



23 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OP THE 



E. B. Dorsett. inspection i J'nn 

Asa S. Stevens, inspection 11 en 

Griffith Printery, printing oca 

H. W. Wickersham, printing ^-^^ 

George A. Woodside, inspection iTnA 

J. W. Tyndell, inspection t'^n 

John M. Seamans, inspection '-^J^ 

O. W. Oster, editing Exchange Bulletin orn? 

W. F. Hill, 1 quarter salary 1701 

C H. Dildine, lecture work il'on 

H. H. Hall, lecture work 26.20 

S. E. Xivin, salary, taxes, etc I'aa 

Grifflth Printery, printing •_ Q7nn 

C. M. Freeman, supplies Inn 

Gertie Xickerson,. inspection 3.00 

J. B. Bricker, inspection 2.00 

The People's Register, printing 40.35 

S. A. Whitney, inspection 3-00 

Amos Fliesher, inspection 1-00 

A. F. Hobbs, inspection 2.00 

K. L. McClain, inspection 2.00 

The Boston Regalia Co., prize banners 40.00 

Gertie Xickerson, inspection ^ 3.00 

Vk\ F. Burchfield, supplies 75.75 

J. E. Bird, inspection •. 3.00 

H. L. Mang, inspection ^ 4.00 

G. H. Small, inspection ^ . . 5.00 

"W. F. Hill, postage, lecture work 59.80 

Henry Buckly, Jr., lecture work 4.10 

A. M. Cornell, lecture work 125.51 

Times Publishing Company, Erie, printing 40.15 

Charles A. Morris, inspection 3.00 

'W. F. Hill, carting and storing trunk 1.25 

W. T. Creasy, Legislative Committee. , 20.00 

George H, Lewis, repairing stamp .29 

W. T. Boring, inspection 16.00 

O. P. Bryant, inspection 8.00 

Valley Spirit, Chambersburg, printing 2.00 

Public Opinion, printing 1.25 

G. M. Freeman, supplies 10.00 

J. L. X. Smyth Co., supplies 3.00 

Harrisburg Cycle and Typewriter Co., supplies 6.75 

E. B. Dorsett, inspection and Leg. Committee 26.87 

Charles A. Morris, inspection , 2.00 

L. W. Howden, inspection 7.00 

Penn'a Farmer Co., printing 25.00 

A. F. Hobbs, inspection 1.00 

J. T. Ailman, 1 quarter salary and expenses, State meeting 212.82 

A. C. Barrett, inspection 1.00 

E. J. Tuttle, Allied Agricultural Organizations 13.44 

Penn'a. State Grange, postage stamps 190.00 

John H. Hicks, inspection 2.00 

J. T. Ailman, stationery 7.68 

G. W. Oster, lecture work 24.21 

Griffith Printery, printing 75.40 

C. M. Freeman, supplies 92.20 

A. J. Seiders, stenographer 3.75 

C. H. Dildine, inspection 1,00 

National Grange Dues, quarter ending Sept. 30, 1904 395.07 

"W. F. Burchfield, supplies 102.50' 

W. F. Hill, balance salary 1904 125.00 

H. W. Wickersham, printing 2.75 

H. H. Hall, lecture work 14.78 

M. N. Clark, allied agricultural associations. . 11.10 

A. J. Seiders stenographer 12.00 

Harrison Straw, inspection. . , ...'...'. 4.00 

A. M. Cornell lecture work 186!30 

Griffith Printery, printing ,, . . . . 39!50 

A. Nevin Pomeroy, printing 53!25 

J. M. Seamans, inspection '.}'.*.! 4!o0 

W. F. Hill, Leg. Committee, lecture work and salary.'!.*.'.*.*.*.*!!** 215!50 

.... ■ ^ 24 ' '..'■■ ■ '• 



f^ 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Penn'a. Farmer, printing (25,000 red books) 125.00 

John S. Dale, premium, re-organizing No. 107 6.50 

G .W. Oster, Executive Committee . 36.28 

M. J. Dixon, stenographer 7.75 

A. J. iSeiders, stenographer 9.35 

J. T. Ailman, 1 quarter salary 225.00 

Nat. Grange Dues, for quarter ending Dec. 31, 1904 344.42 

C. M. Freeman, supplies 90.00 

People's Register, printing 98.30 

W. F. Hill, stenographer 12.90 

W. T. Boring, premium, re-organizing No. 1001 4.75 

I. Frank Chandler, Executive Committee 16.94 

G. H. Small, premium, re-organizing No. 1171 10.75 

W. F. Burchfleld, supplies 27.00 

"William Armstrong, excess fare to iState meeting. : 2.95 

Thomas Printing House, printing Journals and Register 168.00 

C. M. Freeman, supplies 20.92 

C. M. Freeman, supplies 50.00 

Jerry Desmond, inspection 3.00 

W. F. Hill, salary and postage 166.70 

E. B. Rorsett, inspection 3.00 

G. W, Henrie, inspection 1.00 

People's Register, printing 62.00 

Thomas Hurst, inspection 8.45 

J. T. Ailman. 1 quarter salary. 225.00 

W. F. Burchfleld, supplies 31.50 

Nat. Grange Dues quarter ending March 31, 1905 357.55 

C. M. Freeman, supplies 40.00 

Mrs. v. B, Holiday, lecture work 34.23 

W. F. Hill, lecture work 28.35 

A. T. Lilley, inspection 10.00 

J. W. Johnson, lecture work 18.24 

Harrisburg Cycle and Typewriter Co., supplies 2.50 

W. F. Hill, 1 quarter salary 162.50 

Nat. Grange Dues quarter ending June 30, 1905 376.37 

W. F. Burchfleld, supplies 6.00 

W. F. Hill, lecture work and postage 40.89 

M. J. Dixon, stenographer 20.00 

E. B. Norris, lecture work •. 14.51 

J. T. Ailman, 1 quarter salary 225.00 

J. T. Ailman, postage, expressage, office supplies, 1905 243.16 

H. W. Wickersham, printing t 1.50 



$6190.45 
5999.95 



Total Orders $12190.40 

Respectfully Submitted 

J. T. AILMAN. 

Examined and approved, Dec. 13th, 1905. 

S. B. BROWN 
JOHN I. PATTON 
D. B. McWILLIAMS 
Finance Committee. 

Report received and referred to the Finance Committee. 
Worthy Gate Keeper, Wallace Chase; made a verbal report. 
Grange closed at 4:30 p. m. 



25 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



TUESDAY EVENING. 



A public reception was tendered to the State Grange by the people of 
Sunbury. The large Armory was crowded. The following program was ren> 

dered : 

. Sunbury City Band 

Or^ffe?— John G. Chestnutt, Secy. Grange Committee, presiding 

Address of Welcome (For the Mayor of Sunbury) H ,S. Knight, esq. 
Selection— Meanner Gesang Verein Concordia 

Addressof Welcome ((For the Business Men o^^i^^^^^^^^^ig^gnt^ 

cipippfinn Meanner Gesang Verein Concordia 

Address of Welcome M. S. Bond, Danville, Pa. 

(Representative of Pomona Grange of Northumberland Co.) 
Selection— Meanner Gesang Verein Concordia 

Response to Address of Welcome. . -r. , c. * r^ 

\V. F. Hill, Master Penn'a. State Grange. 

Mrs Velma West, Warren Co.(W. C. Penn'a. State Grange. 

Music f.^'.^'^'iP City Band. 

Reading Miss Margaret Rue. 

Music — Vocal Duett Mrs. H. B. Smith, Miss Dietz 

Accompanist, Mrs. Florence Burg. 
Address I. Clinton Kline, Sec. Business Men's Association. 

Selection Meanner Gesang Verein Concordia 



WEDNESDA Y MORNING. 

Grange opened in full form at 9:30 

The Worthy Chaplain, Rev. J. W. Johnson, offered the following : 

Wlioreas, We miss at this meeting the familiar faces of Worthy Past 
Master and his wife, Bro. and Sister Leonard Rhone, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we extend to our worthy brother and sister fraternal 
greetings and express our deep concern and heartfelt sympathy in this their 
hour of suffering and sorrow. That trusting in Him who tempers the wind to 
the shorn lamb, we earnestly pray that He may touch gently our dear 
Brother and Sister and give them suffcient grace. 

Resolved, That a suitable telegram of sympathy be prepared and sent 
to Bro. Rhone. 

The resolution was adopted and the Worthy Secretary was directed to 
execute the will of the Grange. 

The worthy Chaplain, Rev. J. W. Johnson, presented his annual report : 

In making this annual report, I wish, first of all, to acknowledge that 
kind Providence which has kept in health, delivered in disease, protected in 
danger, and, crowning every legitimate effort with success, has brought us, at 
tlie close of a prosperous year to this our annual meeting. The work com- 
mitted to my hands I have tried to do well. The task that gave me the most 
pleasure was the opportunity afforded by the summer picnic campaign. The 
earnest faces, the gleam of awakened intelligence and enthusiasm in the eyes 
of those present revealed the fact that the farmer realized his opportunity and 
responsibility, and was determined to improve the one and bear the other as 
the man of Providence in the 20th Century. 

It is generally conceded that the Grange is a powerful instrument for 
moral good. That all its power is utilized is a matter of some question. 

It is well that we care for the financial and educational interests of the 
rural communities where our order exists, but we should not forget that our 
first object is the development of a higher standard of manhood and woman- 
hood. 

Let us, then, while within the Grange, place more emphasis upon the 
symbolism of both the unwritten and floor work and out of Grange more 
perfectly exemplify in our daily life those principles of truth and morality it 
teaches. Let the social privileges afforded us iby the Grange be so guarded 
that they may be an inspiration to higher and nobler living. 

Through the Juvenile Grange, improved conditions in the home and the- 



26 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



township high school, we may bring to our boys and girls such privileges and 
surround them with such influences as will make them the noblest as weH as 
the most valuable product of the farm. The principles of our order are those 
of Justice, Equity and Morality. Making these priciples a part of ourselves, 
inspired by the triumphs that are behind us, nerved by the obstacles that are 
before us, let us not turn from our labor until, by the blessing of God, these 
principles are universally accepted and our beloved order shall have won its 
crown. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. JOHNSON, Chaplain. 

Report received and ordered to appear in the Journal. 
Worthy Ceres, Sister Velma West, presented her annual report. 

In presenting this so-called report, it is with great humility and regret 
that I must say I have no work to record in connection with my oflJice in this 
State Grange. 

Circumstances have been such that I have been unable to do anything 
more than my customary work in our own County Grange; but I have 
watched with deep interest the efforts put forth by my sisters and brothers all 
over the land, and I fchirik II am justified in a thrill of pride when I note their 
achievements. 

When the National Grange first convened in Atlantic City and the report 
of our gain of 60,000 members during the last year was read, it immediately 
commanded the attention of the press. They considered it worthy of more 
than passing notice that in one year 60,000 busy persons had paused from^ 
their labors to take the vows of a single order. 

This was well, but before that body dispersed it commanded the atten- 
tion of the country, for other and better reasons. 

Newspaper men are keen and quick to discriminate, and they noted the 
scholarly debates on the floor of the house, the clear, logical reasoning, the 
power of concentrating their ideas on the subject at hand; the wide scope of 
subjects discussed, as all admit, with perfect justice and fairness to all, no 
narrow or partisan views expressed — and the absolute unanimity of opinion 
on important matters. 

Never before had I fully realized the strength and the possibilities of our 
order, and that realization gives me greater hope for the future of our coun- 
try than I ihave had for many days, for here, if rightly used, is a great up- 
lifting power. One does not wish to be considered a pessimist, and yet, one 
who notes some tendencies of the present time cannot always take a hopeful 
view of the flnal results. 

There is the increasing tendency toward appropriating any and all prop- 
erty that passes through tour hands, whether its rightful owner consents or 
not; a tendency to think that public ofl^ce merely entitles officials to take part 
in a great game of "Grab;" a growing away from a high standard of truthful- 
ness and purity; and a growing tendency among young and old to lightly re- 
gard human life — this life of infinite possibilities — and among others, a ten- 
dency to treat lightly and flippantly the marriage vow, and the sacredness of 
the home. 

These things, and many others, must be remedied, or our nation will de- 
cline. Here and there we hear of one awake to these things, but concerted ac- 
tion by a large body is all that will cure these diseases. 

The Grange in its history so far has maintained a high standard. Will it 
always be so ? Can we hold out until these many wrongs are righted ? 

History records that most nations and bodies of people banded together 
for any cause, in time drift away from the original honesty and nobility of 
purpose, so let us watch ourselves, so let us train the young, that our order 
may be an exception. 

With commanding position, with power and strength come also greater 
temptations. Scholarly attainments, eloquence of debate, keen intellects are 
good; better still is the public verdict that these are being used for the bet- 
terment of all, not for personal advancement; and may this ever be true of 
our order, though we may not accomplish all we desire, yet may this one 
object be our guiding star, our leading motive in every act in private and pub- 
lic life — to make the name of Patron synonymous with purity of life and 
honesty of purpose. 

Whether working as leaders, or in the ranks, l^t it be known that each 
one is incorruptible, that no Patron betrays his trust in the home, or as a 
citizen; and then through this great body shall come these needed reforms. 



27 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



And as the fountain head of all, let us especially guard the sanctity of the 
home, these beautiful farm homes nestled over our fair land. 

Let it not be said that we are discontented here and seelc the excitements 
of town life. Much is said of how to keep the boys on the farm; but where 
I have known of one man or boy discontented there I have known of at least 
ten women and girls who positively could 'not exist on a farm. 

This idea that there can be no pleasure without the constant stimulus of 
society outside our own family is not a healthful sign; it is akin to the thirst 
for drugs and stimulants, and indicates a lack of mental poise. 

In the early days of this nation, our fore-mothers reigned as queens in 
their isolated homes, they had strength of intellect and mental resources that 
were all sufficient for themselves and their families, and from their training 
came forth a generation of men and women of intellectual power, physical 
strength, and incorruptible honor that no succeeding generation has equalled. 
Ruskin says the love of power is an inextinguishable instinct. God set it 
deep-rooted in the heart of man and woman, and keeps it there. 

So, instead of longing to be a power in so-called society or a leader in 
pursuit of pleasure, let each woman strive, as Ruskin further says, "for the 
power to heal, to redeem, to guide, and to guard; the power of the royal hand 
that heals in touching; that binds the fiend, and looses the captive; the throne 
that is founded on the rock of justice, and descended from only by steps of 
mercy." 

This is the power I covet for our sisters and brothers, and for our order 
as a whole as long as it may endure. 

Mrs. B. A. WEST. 

Report received for publication in the journal. 

Worthy Flora, Mrs. J. S. Dale submitted her report. 
T^orthy Master, Sisters and Brothers : 

There are few natural objects more poetical in their general associations 
than flowers, from the majestic sunflower to the modest violet, all have re- 
ceived more than passing notice. 

What a desolate place would be a world without a flower. It would be 
a face without a smile, a feast without a welcome. They are the partners of 
human joys, soothers of human sorrow. Flowers contain the lang-uage and 
sentiments of the heart, as the lily an emblem of innocence, the violet of 
modesty, forget-me-not of remembrance. Even the dispositions of the soul 
are expressed by the flowers, as grief by the weeping willow; thus, Nature by 
these flowers, seems to express her loving sympathy with men. 

There is something connected with the rose which renders it a more true 
and striking emblem of earthly pleasure than any other — it bears a thorn. 
This real or ideal mingling of pain and •sorrow with the exquisite beauty of 
the rose, reminds us of the inevitable blending of clouds and sunshine, hope 
and fear, weal or woe in this our earthly inheritance. All that we enjoy in 
this world or yearn to possess, has this accompaniment. Happy are those 
who have counted the cost of the coming year, that they shall not find at the 
end, they have expended either hope or desire in fruitless speculations. 

• We would urge upon all the importance of nature studies in our public 
schools and the necessity of adorning our homesand our surroundingsfwith flow- 
ers, so they will attract and retain the attention and affections of our children. 
I would also ask that some action be taken in regard to the costly free seed 
distribution by the Government, as it benefits but few and injures the general 
trade. 

My duties as Flora have been very pleasant during my brief term. I 
have received nearly four hundred brothers and sisters at my Court. We hop« 
many more may avail themselves of the opportunity afforded at this session 
to secure its privileges. 

Another year is drawing to a close, soon to leave only its memory. May 
these few days we spend together be some of our happiest recollections. 

Fraternally submitted 

Mrs. J. S. DALE. 

Report received for publication in the journal. 

Worthy Pomona ,Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, presented her report. 

Worthy Master, Brothers and Sisters of Penn'a. State Grange : 

In a little while another year will take its place among the countless 
thousands that have gone before, and as we turn with hope and ambition to 
the future, let us try to make the coming year more profitable than the past, 
spiritually as well as materially, for we can by the lessons they have taught. 



28 



PENNSTtVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



make even our reverses and mistakes bear the same fruits as our successes. 

In ancient mythology, Pomona was the Goddess of Fruit, and was rep- 
resented as holding aloft a cornucopia, which symbolized prosperity, and when 
we compare our own prosperous state with other countries bordering on 
starvation, and some in actual revolution and warfare, we can congratulate 
ourselves that this symbol is^ peculiarly appropriate to us and our condition, 
for throughout our beloved land, from its centers to it sborders, each report 
lias spelled success, and none of them more emphatically than our own State 
of Pennsylvania, which by its agricultural achievement and its advancement 
in other lines, has proven its right to be called the "Keystone State" and justi- 
fies its position at the top of the arch of Prosperity which spans the entire 
country. 

Although the fruit crop of Pennsylvania is inconsiderable, compared with 
its agricultural interests, yet its production, augmented by the output of other 
States devoted almost entirely to the raising of fruit, makes this branch of 
the farmers' industry more imposing than a casual glance would indicate, limit- 
ed as it is from an agricultural environment such as exists in Pennsylvania; 
so, while the skill and intelligence and labor of our own State is directed to- 
ward the husbanding of cereals and vegetables, other States, whose soil is 
adapted where climate is propitious, are devoting their time and applying 
their energies to the cultivaton of God's greatest gift to mankind. And this 
brings home to us with impressive force, the fact that we are dependent 
creatures, and were not destined to live alone. We see by the advantages we 
gain by the interchange of our products with other States and Nations, each 
one benefitted by the mutual exchange, in disposing of his surplus and ac- 
quiring what he lacks. 

Fruit, mankind's greatest gift, has figured in the world's history from the 
fall of Adam to the present time. It needs less than any other product of the 
soil, the artifices of man to maks it palatable, and is -not enhanced in quality 
or- flavor by cultivation. Indeed, in its natural state as Nature produces and 
develops it, it is at its best, and its refreshing qualities reversed and proverted 
when art is mixed with Nature, and it becomes an intoxicant and the great 
agent for evil our world has ever known. 

Let us draw from this the lesson, then, that there is evil in the most 
palpable blessing if it be misapplied. Let us avoid those evils, accept the 
blessings, and live that when our summons come to join the innumerable 
caravan that moves to the pale realms of shade; when each must take his 
chamber in the silent Halls* of Death, we go not, like the galley slave, scourged 
to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed by an unfaltering trust, approach 
our grave, like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him and Hes 
down to pleasant dreams. 

Fraternally 

Dec. 12th, 1905. MARY MILLER FISHER. 

Report received and ordered to appear In the journal. 

Worthy Lady Assistant Steward, Mrs. Frances Arters, presented her an 

nual report, as follows : 

Mill Village, Pa. 
Worthy Master and Patrons : 

I am proud that I can address you as a member of this grand order. The 
very name brings to us the noblest of all thoughts. The Grange ! The Farm ! 
Nature ! and Nature's God ! 

The degree work used in our Subordinate Granges, with Its beautiful 
lessons, taken from nature, is becoming more popular each year throughout 
our jState. It should be thus. Nothing more beautiful or Impressive can be 
conceived than the lessons here taught. The signs and symbols here given. 
Our Flora, with her sweet blossoms; Pomona with her luscious fruit, and Ceres 
with her ripened grain ready for the harvest. The ever changing seasons re- 
mind us of the many changes in life, and of the "great harvest where we 
shall all be garnered at last." All honor to the aged Patrons who nourished 
the Grange In its infancy, who guided its youthful steps and inspired It with 
courage when it was despised and ridiculed by many of th« farmers. Now It 
has become strong and influential; Its step Is full of confidence. But, Patrons, 
we must guard it well. There are dangers which assail the Grange to-day, 
which the founders of the order had no reason to fear. As our Influence and 
power becomes greater, our responsibility will become greater also. As we 
note the attitude taken by our National Grange at Its last session we are con- 
strained to believe that the Grange stands to-day for that which is pure, 



29 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



progressive and just, and it may be a powerful factor in bringing us to that 
state wliere we shall have "Equal rights for all and special privileges for 
none." I am glad we are Patrons of the old Keystone State, although it has 
been called the most corrupt State in the Union, politically. We Intend to 
clean it up. The good work has commenced at Philadelphia, and in the little 
north-west corner of our great State, in Erie County, where the waters of the 
great lakes bathe the shore, and we feel the breeze (not always the gentle 
zephyrs we heard of) but the fierce tempestuous winds that make Patrons 
strong and hardy. We are making some progress in reform, and throughout 
the State the Grange has been instrumental in helping along the good work. 
The old Keystone State needs the Patron and I am glad we are here. I think 
our State Grange is the best equipped in the United States. Let me prove it to 
you : 

The Worthy Gate Keeper in his place, 

The enemy he will surely Chase 

Nor let a single person through 

Without the pass-word good and true. 



Our Steward guards well the inner 
Quick to respond, he's never late. 
He doesn't worry nor repine, 
He can't do better than re-Kline. 



gate, 



For stock food and for poultry too, 
We have a man whose name's not new; 
The one oft seen on bill boards ? No, not that; 
But our Assistant Steward, H. H. Pratt. 



Without a Johnson no order is complete. 
Our Chaplain comes to save us from defeat. 
Our morals he will guard with care 
To do a wrong, we will never dare. 



Our Overseer, tried and true 
In years has served us not a few. 
How much longer, who can tell ? 
But we can (Barret) very well. 

Pomona is a Fisher who can set the bait. 
And bring in the farmers at a rapid rate. 
She baits her hook with logic wise, 
And coats it well with many why's. 

Our Flora is a flowry Dale 
With her in court we'll never fail 
To have the fairest summer weather 
As we dwell in Grange together. 

Our Ceres is the active West; 
Of ripened grain she brings the best. 
Her products are both rich and rare, 
Compete with her none other dare. 

To our good Treasurer, Nivin, 
All our ready cash is given; 
To campaign funds he does not give 
That which makes our order live. 

Our University of Knowledge, Cornell, 
If we follow his precepts, we do well. 
As Lecturer traveling through our State 
He Is always prompt and up-to-date. 

Our Secretary, Ailman, faithful and true, 
In spite of his name; he is temperate, too; 
He keeps the accounts and sends the news' 
And makes us promptly pay our dues. 



30 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Our Master, Hill, leads to heights of fame, 
Patrons will follow and help the same. 
We'll climb the highest mountain range, 
The Old Pennsylvania State Grange. 
Fraternally submitted, 

Mrs. PRANCES 



ARTERS. 



Report received and ordered to appear in the journal. 

The following resolutions were received and referred : 

Pertaining to the purchase by the State of forest lands — Legislation. 

Primary Elections — Legislation. 

Parcel Post — Legislation. 

Classification of Public Roads — Legislation 

Recognition of Pennsylvania Farmer — Education 

Immigration — Legislation 

Bro. O. H. Kelly, Washington, D. C, the only surviving founder of the 
•order, was present at the meeting by special invitation of Worthy Master Hill. 
At this time he was escorted to the hall by the Worthy Assistant Steward and 
lady officers and greeted by the Grange with the Chatauqua salute. An ad- 
dress of welcome was given him by Hon. Frank Porter, Worthy Past Over- 
seer of the State Grange, and a charter member of Eagle Grange No. 1. 

Bro. Kelly responded in an appropriate address. A recess was then de- 
clared and the sisters greeted Bro. Kelly with a hand shake and the brothers 
with the Chautauqua salute. 

On motion Bro. Kelly was requested to furnish a copy of his address for 
publication in the journal. 

[Bro. Kelly's address was given to the Grange Press Rep- 
resentative at Sunbury, who has failed to return it in time to in- 
sert here. If received later it will apear on a following page.] 

Bro. N. B. Critchfield, Secretary of Agriculture, was introduced and gave 

a short talk on the work of the department. 

Bro. W. G. Embree, of Chester County, offered the following : 

In view of the fact that proposed National legislation and legal action 

seriously threaten the dairy and farming interests of the United States in 

general, and Pennsylvania especially. Therefore, I move that the Worthy 
Master appoint a committee consisting of one member from each county to 

meet at one o'clock to-day with the Worthy Master, the Legislative commit- 
tee, the Secretary of Agriculture, and the Dairy and Food Commissioner to 
formulate some form of action to safeguard our interests.. 
The motion was adopted. 

The following committee was appointed : 

W. G. Embree, Chester County. 

L. N. Fife, 1186 Allegheny 

S. S. Blyholder, 549 Armstrong. 

Thompson Ling, 531 Bedford. 

Frank M. Glasgow, 664 Blair. 

Louis Piplett, 58 Bradford. 

Horace Smith, 507 Bucks. 

Jacob Albert, 133 Butler. 

F. J. Ivory, 1118 Cambria. 

W. T. Eroh, 1032 Carbon. 

N. B. Schaffer, 96 Centre. 

J. T. Frampton, 654 Clarion. 

Alfred Wells, 802 Clearfield. 



^1 



Icr^^ 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE, 



W. H. Dornblaser, 334 Clinton. 
L. M. Creveling, 46 Columbia. 
H. J. Griggs, 190 Crawford. 
R. H. Thomas, 16 Cumberland. 

F. P. Willitts, 1141 Delaware. 
E. J. C. Grotzinger, 1155 Elk. 
H. H. Rose, 147 Erie. 

W. L. Newcomer, 785 Fayette. 
M. E. Herman, 1252 Franklin 
Fred "Weingart, 853 Forest. 
W. T. Boring, 1210 Huntingdon. 

G. W. Treese, 573 Indiana. 

J. Womeldorf, 1264 Jefferson. 
Joseph Hosteller, 786 Juniata. 
H. E, Capwell, 1200 Lackawana. 
J. A. McSparran, 6 6 Lancaster. 
L. B. Geiger, 86 Lehigh. 
O. P. Edwards, 1260 Luzerne.' 

E. L. McNett, 454 Lycoming. 
W. Sawyer, 1182 McKean. 
R. K. Baker, 658 Mercer. 

F. I. McCoy, 731 Miffllin. 

L. R. Suplee, 112 Montgomery. 

J. A. Merrill, 1184 Montour. 

W. M. Benninger, 82 9 Northampton. 

E. N. Marsh, 249 Northumberland. 

D. A. Tressler, 626 Perry. 
L. O. Prince, 1247 Potter. 

J. T. Garroway, 1225 Schuylkill. 

B. Hummel, 191 Snyder. 
A. Coleman, 878 Somerset. 

F. S. Williams, 432 Susquehanna. 
W. Redner, 1223 Tioga. 

C. Schaffer, 284 Venango. 

E. D Steward, 1025 Warren. 

J. E. Steward, 3 34 Washington. 

S. H. Hine, 1048 Wayne. 

W. F. Holtzer, 724 Westmoreland. 

T. S. Vaughn, 1250 Wyoming. 

W. S. Newcomer, 1270 York. 

E. G. Rogers, 976 Sullivan. 

Grange took a recess until 2 p. m. 



WEDNESDA Y AFTERNOON, 



m. 



Grange convened at 2 p. 

Bro. H. P. Amsby, Director of the Experiment Station at State College, 
Pa., was introduced *and spoke on the work of the institution. 

Hon. A. L. Martin, Director of Farmers' Institutes, also addressed the 
State Grange on the work of his. department. 

Resolutions were introduced for reference as follows : 

Asking that weather reports be sent over telephone lines — ^Agriculture. 

Amending Oleomargarine Law — Legislation. 



32 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANaE. 






Authorizing application for change of franchise of Penn'a Grange News — 

Good of the Order. 

Establishing an International Institute of Agriculture — Agriculture. 

Collecting specimens of birds, etc. — Education. 

Bro. John Mc. Henry, of Columbia County, was introduced and ad- 
dressed- the Grange on the subject of Grange Banks. 

The Worthy Chaplain offered the following resolution fOr immediate 

action : 

Whereas, we have learned with alarm of the great misuse of the policy- 
holders' money by the great life insurance companies; and, whereas, we do 
not believe the services of any man as president of a life insurance company 
are worth $150,000 per anhum; and, whereas, most Insurance companies take 
risks that are questionable; and, whereas, the farmer because of his tem- 
perate habits and out of door life is the best possible risk, and the Patrons 
on Husbandry the best risk among the farmers; Therefore, be it. 

Resolved, That we, as Patrons of Husbandry in State Grange assembled 
do hereby express it as our opinion that it is not a good business principle for 
us to continue to pay exorbitant premiums for our life insurance, which money 
is used in Wall Street and by the Trusts against our interests. 

Resolved, That the Worthy Master of this State Grange do here appoint 
a committee of three to work in connection with the Worthy Master and the 
Executive Committee in considering the feasibility and practicability of or- 
ganizing a Grange Life Insurance Company and to prepare plans for the 
same, and to report at the next annual session of tlie State Grange. 

The resolutions were agreed to. 

The Executive Committee, by its Secretary, G. W. Oster, submitted their 
annual report as follows : 

REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Fellow Patrons : 

In accordance with our usual custom, your Executive Committee here- 
with submits its annual report for your consideration. 

We have nothing new to offer, or no radical measures, ideas or theories 
to present; but will simply outline, as briefly as possible, our work during 
the past year, as well as to present for your consideration the present status 
of our order and a few suggestions for the good of the order. 

Early last winter we met at Harrisburg to lay plans for an aggressive 
Grange campaign during the year. 

In August, at the call of the Worthy Master, we met at West Chester. A 
number of matters of more or less importance were acted upon at these meet- 
ings, some of which have been commented on by the Worthy Master in his- 
annual address to- this body. 

Prize Banners. 

It was decided to again offer prize banners to the five Granges in the 
State that would add the largest number of members to their rolls during 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1905, and whose reports were received by the Statet 
Secretary before Nov. 1, 1905. 

Wc have learned of a considerable number of Granges that entered the 
contest and made an effort to win a banner. Many Granges that did not win 
did most excellent work, and deserve great praise and commendation for 
their labors. 

The following Granges have won banners, and they will be formally pre- 
sented to the representatives of the respective Granges, during the week in 
open session of the Grange, to wit : 

Columbia Grange No. 83, Bradford County, gained 239 members. 

Sparta Grange No. 110, Crawford County, gained 106 members. 

Harford Grange, No. 418, Susquehanna County, gained 90 members. 

Clover Leaf Grange, No. 1265, Erie County, gained 86 members. 

Thompson Grange, No. 868, Susquehanna County, gained 82 members. 

Surplus Fund. 

At the Wilkes-Barre session in 1903, at our suggestion, it was directed 
that the rebates received from our business houses hereafter should be set 
aside as a surplus or sinking fund. This fund now amounts to $1268.11, and 
is invested in first mortgages on real estate ajid is absolutely safe. 



33 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



Rebates from Business Houses. 

The D. B. Martin Co $ 20.96 

Whitehead & Hoag Co 20.76 

L. Z. Replogle 79 

Farm Journal -40 

Lester Shoe Co .^ 5.28 

Patterson & Evans V 7.00 

Lubin & Co 30.00 

Demorest Mfg Co 1.49 

Cooper Commission Co 2,80 

The Hoover & Allison Co 109.63 

The Whitney Noyes Seed Co 7.79 

C. H. Dildine 72 

The Garver Bros. Co 31.62 

George H. Calvin , 1.17 

■ O. W. Ingersoll 17.46 

G. W.Oster 2.70 

W. P. Rupert & Sons 89 

"Knowles Freeman Pish Co .24 

Garitee & Sons 14.25 

Charles W. Ford & Co 1.00 

Heman Glass 6.07 

Johnson Seed Potato Co .28 

Danforth Chemical Co 2.34 

The Thielman Seed Co 14.84 

Thornton Barnes 208.95 

Black Rock Mills 12.34 



Total $521.77 

The rebates received from our houses are not nearly so large as they were 
some years ago. This is due to several reasons. We realize tbat conditions 
have been, and are, all the while, changing. The Department Store has sprung 
-up in every city or business center all over the country, and the people are 
attracted to these business centers and deal largely with these houses. Com- 
petition is great in some localities, and in such cases goods are sold at a very 
<;lose margin. Then, again, the big catalogue houses have flooded every com- 
munity with their catalogues and advertising matter, and many thousands of 
dollars go to these houses annually, that used to go to our business houses. 

A number of new contracts were made during the year, some of which, 
at least, deserve special mention. We have arranged with The Cooper Com- 
mission Company, of Minneapolis, Minn., and also with the Black Rock Mills, 
of Buffalo, N. Y., to supply Patrons with flour, all kinds of mill feed, grain,, 
etc., at wholesale prices. ^ 

We also desire in this connection to especially call your attention to the 
co-operative arrangement that we have recently made with Lubin & Co., of 
27 Walker St,. New York. This Grange Co-operative Mail Order House Is 
located in the great commercial center of America. In this great metropolis 
all the large manufacturing concerns and importers have their main offices. 
Styles are made and modified there, and buyers from all over the country go 
there to learn what are the season's correct styles. Our mail order house is 
located right there and with its experienced buyers on the spot ever ready to 
take advantage of the best in value and style which the market affords. 

In dealing with them, we are sure to get the very best possible value for 
the money. No discounts or rebates are allowed any one, but the State 
Grange will recevve a share of the profits arising from all business done witli 
Penn'a. Patrons, provided they send their orders on the special (^ange order 
blank so that the house may know that the order comes from a Patron. We 
want to urge the necessity and importance of you using this special order 
blank in sending your orders at all times. This house is worthy of our sopport 
and we urge upon our members throughout the State to patronize it as largely 
as possible. 

The Grange Pamphlet. 

Cominonly called "The Little Red Book," has, we believe, done a good 
work, and as the supply was exhausted, we directed that another edition of 
25,000 copies be printed. We believe it is fulfilling its mission and filling a 
long felt want and need of the order in our State. 

34 



•k 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Our Financial Condition. 

It is gratifying to note that the State Grange Treasury is in a healthy 
condition, notwithstanding the fact that the mileage paid at the session at 
Wilkes-Barre in 1903 and at Erie in 1904 was much more than the average 
mileage paid, as the following computation for the last seven sessions will 

show, to wit : » ' 

Williamsport, 1898 — 372 representatives. Mileage paid, $2040.22. Aver- 
age mileage per representative, $5.50. 

Lock Haven, 1899 — 374 representatives. Mileage paid, $2272.57. Aver- 
age mileage per representative, $6.07. 

Lock Haven, 1900 — 392 representatives. Mileage paid, $2284.01. Aver- 
age mileage per representative, $5.83. 

Johnstown, 1901 — 418 representatives. Mileage paid, $3170.05. Aver- 
age mileage per representative, $7.58. 

Clearfield, 1902 — 439 representatives. Mileage paid, $2866.85. Aver- 
age mileage per representative, $6.5 3. 

Wilkes-Barre, 1903 — 503 representatives. Mileage paid, $3679.50. Av- 
erage mileage per representative, $7.32. 

Erie, 1904 — 590 representatives. Mileage paid, $5370.05. Average mile- 
age per representative, $9.10. 

Average amount of mileage paid for a period of six sessions preceding the 
Erie meeting, $2718.87. 

We estimate that the number of representatives attending this session 
who are entitled to mileage will be about 550, and that the mileage will be 
about $3300 or an average of about $6.00 per representative. 

Financial Statement. 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Dec. 1, 1904 $13092.16 

Received from Fees, Dues, etc 12581.30 

Total $25673.46 

Paid out as per Vouchers during the year 12210.70 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, J^ec. 1, 1905 13462.76 

Amount of Surplus Fund 1268.11 

These figures show a net gain of nearly $400 over last year's balance ex- 
clusive of the surplus fund, and after paying mileage or representatives at 
Erie, just about doiible the mean average mileage paid for the six preceeding 
sessions. 

It is pleasing to know that we are on a sound, healthy financial basis, 
and it greatly encourages us to know that such is the case. Due caution must 
be observed to guard carefully our treasury, for a good financial showing adds 
strength, influence and prestige to our order, while a lack of funds means just 
tTie opposite, and very much retards our work and progress as an organization. 

Grange Pai)ers. 

Every Patron should subscribe for and read several good Grange papers 
and learn of the doings of the order, not only in our own State, but through- 
out the whole country. We feel that we cannot too strongly urge upo'T^ you 
the necessity of patronizing the Grange press more liberally. It helps won- 
derfully to create enthusiasm, and makes us all better and more faithful 
Patrons for having done so. 

Classifled Expenditures. 

The amounts spent during the year for the several departments of Grange 
work are as follows, to wit : 

Mileage orders (590) session of 1904. $ 5370.05 

Other expenses, State meeting 1904 444.44 

Inspection service 149.00 

Printing 826.05 

Salaries 1475.00 

Lecture work 590.94 

Executive Committee 182.08 

Finance Committee 124.87 

Legislative Committee 75.37 

National Grange Dues 1473.41 

Supplies . . ., 569.37 

Postage, expresi^ge and other miscellaneous expenses 930.12 

Total $12210.70 



35 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OF THE 



II- I 



Co-operation. 

The great principles underlying our order are Fraternity, Co-operation, 
and Education. Each year our membership is becoming more and more 
firmly united, and more surely convinced of the fact that thorough organiza- 
tion and co-operation is an absolute necessity among our class, as well as any 
other calling or profession. 

If we would accomplish our aims and objects as a class and as an or- 
ganization, we must co-operate and stand together in all matters and things 
that pertain to our benefit or advancement in any way. The word "co-op- 
eration," in its ordinary signification, means : working together to accom- 
plish a certain end or purpose. 

By united efforts, we have in the past, accomplished much that is worthy 
of notice or mention, but it is not our purpose at this time to discuss or com- 
ment on our past achievements, but we do want to urge or recommend a few 
things in this connection. / 

We believe we have the best ^Dusiness arrangements that it is possible to 
make, and the houses with whom we have contracted are, we think, all repu- 
table concerns, and are worthy of our support and patronage and we there- 
fore urge upon Subordinate Granges and individual members the necessity 
and importance of standing by and patronizing our houses as much as we 
possibly can. 

Fire Insurance. 

Grange Fire Insurance Companies, wherever they exist, have resulted, 
not only in a great saving in the cost of insurance to our members, by giving 
them protection at actual cost, but it has been the means of strengthening 
and building up the order in every jurisdiction or county where these in- 
surance companies are located. . We would therefore urge that such com- 
panies be formed in every county where it is possible to do so, and where the 
membership of a single county is not strong enough to organize within their 
membership, let two or more counties (through the medium of the Pomona 
Granges) go together and organize a company, but let it always be under the 
direct control and management of our order. 

Organize Banks. 

We are pleased to learn that the live, earnest, wide-awake Patrons of 
Tioga County have recently organized a National Bank. This is a good move 
in the right direction,- and there is no good reason why many more institu- 
tions of this kind should not be established under the control of the Patrorts 
of this State. 

We would, therefore, respectfully suggest and recommend that every 
Pomona Grange in the State shall, at its next meeting, discuss the propriety 
of organizing a bank in the county, or if the membership in a single county 
is not strong enough to undertake' it alone, let the Granges of several counties 
(or say a Congressional or Senatorial district) go together and establish a 
bank under the auspices of the Grange if possible. 

Let Pomona Granges of adjoining counties appoint committees to meet 
with other Pomonas and give the matter a fair and full consideration, and 
then report the result o£. your action through the columns of the Penn'a 
Grange News and other Grange papers so that our membership may all be 
kept fully informed as to what progress is being made along these lines. 

A State Grange Banlc. 

It might be well for this body to consider the advisability of establishing 
a bank at some .suitable point in our State which could be used as a depository 
by all Patrons. We are of the opinion that a very large subscription of stock 
could be raised, if every member of the order in Pennsylvania was given an 
opportunity to become a stockholder therein. If an institution of this kind 
were to be established there is no doubt but that in course of a few years 
under proper management it would become one of the strongest and most 
powerful financial institutions in the Keystone State. 

We have no doubt that this may sound like fiction to some and that 
some of the representatives here present will doubt the feasibility of this 
project, and may think that we are overstepping the bounds of propriety in 
recommending the consideration of a proposition of this kind and that it 
would be out of our line of business, that ordinarily belongs to our class of 
people. But, verily, the farmer is a business man. These are broad and liberal 
views and should not be passed by un-noticed. The time has come when we 
should think and act for ourselves in all business matters and things that 
pertain to our business interests. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Too long has the American farmer stood still like a stump or graven 
imaee and allowed the Shylock, the Shark, the Manipulator, the Rag-Tag 
politician, the Monopolist and the Grafter to do his thinking and his business 
for him. The farmer of to-day must awaken to a realization of a sense of his 
duty to himself and to his individual interests. Let us stop for a moment to 
consider the magnitude, the importance and the proportions of the American, 
farmer as compared with other interests and industries. 

National Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, in his annual report just given 
to the public a few days ago, says : "For the product of his brains and land 
and machinery the American farmer this year realized the enormous sum of 
$6 450,000,000. Never before in the history of this, or any other nation, has 
such a tremendous result been attained. In order to properly invest his in- 
come which exceeded last year's by $256,000,000, the farmer this year estab- 
lished 1,754 new banks, and farm lands have increased in val.ue about 33 per 
cent. Farm products are yearly exported with a port value of $875,000,000, and 
farmers have reversed an adverse balance of trade and have been building up 
one favorable to this country by sending to foreign nations a surplus, which in 
16 years has aggregated $12,000,000,000, leaving an apparent net balance of 
trade during that time amounting to $5,092,000,000, after an adverse balance 
against manufacturers and all other products not agricultural amounting to 
$543,000,000 has been offset. 

"The American farmer last year sold $1,125,000,000 worth of dairy and 
poultry products, which is greater than that of the iron and steel industries. 

"The value of the corn crop amounted to the vast sum of $1,216,000,000." 
If this corn was loaded on two horse wagons at the rate of fifty bushels of 
ear corn to the load, it would ma'ke 97,280,000 loads, and if all these teams 
were lined up in one procession, allowing a space of two rods for each team, 
it would make a string of teams 608,000 miles long and would reach more 
than twenty-four times around the earth. If all these teams were to start 
in a procession around the earth, and were to jog along at the rate of four 
miles an hour, driving ten hours per day and 313 working days to the year, 
and if they were to pass through Sunbury on their journey, and the^tate 
Grange desired to see the procession pass, we would have to take a recess of 
15,200 days, or more than 48 years to see them pass through this city. 

These figures are stupendous and of immense proportions and deserve 
careful study and consideration. They are a credit to ourselves and to our 
great nation. 

Is it not, therefore, of the utmost importance that we should learn to 
co-operate, not only in regard to marketing our crops, but along financial and 
all other lines affecting our interests as well ? 

In conclusion, we want to urge upon all to continue to labor together for 
the good of our order and mankind, and bring into the Grange fold all eligible, 
worthy farmers who are broad minded and intelligent enough to see good In 
their fellow beings and to recognize and realize the necessity, importance and 
advantages of organization, association and co-operation. 

Fraternally submitted, 

GEO. W. OSTBR, 

C. H. DILDINE 

W. F. HILL, 

I. FRANK CHANDLER, 

Executive Committee. 
Report adopted as read. 

The report of the Legislative Committee was presented by Hon. W. T. 
Creasy, as follows : 

REPORT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE. 

— of the — 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE 

At its Annual Session, Sunbury, Pa., Dec. 12th-15th, 1905 

THIRTY — THIRD SESSION. 

Worthy Master and Members of the Pennsylvania State Grange : 

Your Legislative Committee beg leave to report that we have given dur- 
ing the past year careful consideration to legislation affecting the agricultural 
interests of our State, and made every effort to carry out twe instructions of 
this body given to us one year ago at the Erie meeting. 



37 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OF THE 



Under those instructions we prepared and presented to the last Legisla- 
ture bills on those subjects, with the following results : A bill to allow trolley 
roads to carry freight. Killed by the Committee on City Passenger Railways. 
Bills favoring the return of all the license money and personal property taxes. 
Pigeonholed in the Ways and Means Committee. Bills regulating railroads 
and passenger rates. Pigeonholed in the Railroad Committee. Bills favoring 
legislation for the initiative referendum. Pigeonholed in the committee. Bill 
for ballot reform. Pigeonholed in committee. Bill for a general primary elec- 
tion law met same fate. 

Nothing further was said about the treatment that the farmers received 
at the last session of that subservient Legislature until one day in November 
last, we think it was the seventh, when it was discovered that the people reg- 
istered a mighty protest against tliis kind of treatment. And should this plan 
of defeating all reform movements continue there will be a mightier protest 
next time. The people are beginning to learn that political parties are sup- 
posed to carry out the wishes of the people, and when they fail to do this it is 
our duty to apply the remedy. 

In 'the matter of taxation, we can only report what has been said by this 
committee for more that 15 years — that the grossest inequalities exist in our 
present tax laws. Our present method of State taxation is not based on acta 
of the Legislature, but on decisions of the courts, so that we find that com- 
peting corporations in the same town or city are taxed differently. One pays 
State taxes on its capital stock, bonded indebtedness and gross earnings, while 
the other pays no State taxs at all. We refer to electric light and gas com- 
panies. And it is common report that the latter is not taxed because the 
Standard Oil Company owns many artificial gas plants either by purchase or 
lease. In short, our tax laws are made to favor trusts and monopolies and 
can not be changed on account of their campaign contributions. 

The old chestnut that the farmer and other real estate owners pay no 
State tax is very delusive. Real estate is paying about 15 mills tax on the 
dollar, while corporate and personal property is paying an average of three 
(3) mills. The fact that one pays its taxes to the State and the other to the 
local authorities can not maks up for this injustice. Because of this inequality 
the great corporate interests and their agents are opposed to any change In 
our bungling tax laws. 

The Grange plan of retaining in the counties the license and part of the 
personal property taxes is meeting with more favor and is the correct way of 
keeping down the surplus. The return of these taxes would reduce local tax- 
ation to that amount and equalize taxation to a certain extent. 

The laying up of a large surplus by the State is wrong in principle, be- 
cause it breeds corruption and extravagance; it is wrong in law, since the gov- 
ernmental function in taxation is to collect only such amounts of money by 
taxation as is actually needed to run the government economically. 

Suppose a municipality would collect twice as much money from the 
taxpayers as it needs for its schools, roads, etc., how long would the taxpayers 
tolerate it ? Yet this is practically what we are doing in our State finances. 
A reasonable surplus, say from one to two millions of dollars, is all that the 
State should carry. Our tax laws are badly in need of revision. The Grange 
must keep on pointing out the way. Eternally keeping at it will win feuccess. 

Roads. 

The Grange secured the passage of a Township Road Law at the last 
session of the Legislature. Its principal features are the election of a con- 
tinuous board of three supervisors, one being elected each year and all to serve 
without pay. Their duties are similar to those of a school board. This 
Board appoints Road Masters, fixes wages, and may contract out the building 
of roads for a continuous period not to exceed three years to the same tax- 
payer, and for a stretch of road not exceeding three miles in length. By 
petitioning court the citizens of a township may secure the right to decide by 
ballot whether the road taxes shall be paid in cash. In case the voters decide 
to pay cash the township will receive fifteen per cent of the amount raised In 
said township. Your committee recommends that the percentage borne by 
the State be increased to fifty per cent., as in the States of Delaware and New 
York. 

So far, the various townships of Pennsylvania have built and maintained 
the 100,000 miles of public roads, at a cost of over four millions of dollars 
annually. The State Grange years ago took the position that as the public 
roads were used by all of the people, all should contribute to their building 
and maintenance. This proposiiton is fundamental and must be respected. 

This new Township Road Law has been published In the official paper of 

38 " 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



our order, The Grange News, as well as explanations relative to the more im- 
portant points. It passed the House and Senate unanimously and while not 
perfect it should receive the support of every one that is interested in having- 
a system in the management of our public roads. One of the strong points of 
this new law is that it puts all the power in the hands of the people instead, 
of delegating it to outsiders. Even the provisions allowing the voters to adopt 
a cash tax can be repealed by the same authority if not satisfactory. The law" 
has been attacked because the Board of three supervisors receive no pay. In 
our opinion this is one of the best features of the law,as it will have a tendency 
to secure the services of men who are interested in good roads at the lowest 
possible cost. And it is our hope that the farmers of the State will make an 
effort at the coming February election to put this law into operation in goo3 
shape, and whatever its defects are can be remedied at the next session of the 
Legislature. 

State Road Law. 

At the last Legislature, through the efforts of the Grange, the part whicli 
the township and county pay toward the building of a State road was reduced 
from one-sixth to one-eighth each. Another change was that application must 
be filed by May first of each year or the money will go to those counties that 
have applications filed for more than their share of the State aid. This State 
road law needs some radical changes, because it is impossible for the State 
Department to build roads in 67 counties in the State at the same time, unless 
it has a regiment of men at Harrisburg. This is too expensive and slow a ' 
business. The red tape around this law must be removed. The money paid 
direct to the counties. The department having the overseeing power with the 
right to withhold the appropriation if the road is not properly built. The cost 
of these roads are excessive and we are opposed to bonding counties and town- 
ships for their construction. It would seem reasonable that some cheaper 
method could be devised for building many roads which would answer the 
same PHrpose as the more costly ones. Another subject that is coming up 
and creating a great deal of trouble is the reckless use of automobiles on our 
public roads. It has come to pass that we farmers are afraid to send our 
wives and daughters out with a carriage lest they should be injured or killed. 
So far the automobile people have paid little or no tax toward building or 
maintaining our country roads, and while under the law they have a right to 
travel them, we insist that they use the greatest care. 

School Appropriations. 

The appropriation to Township High Schools was increased from $100,- 
000 to $200,000 at the last session of the Legislature through the efforts of 
the riinnge. Our common school appropriation should be increased. We are 
not apjjiopriating as much to them as we did when the treasury carried no 
surplus, because there are deductions made that were not made at that time. 

Direct Ijegislation. 

On this subject we quote from our report of last year, as follows : 
"Relative to the initiative and referendum the Grange cannot afford to 
take a backward step when we consider that this is no new thing, except, per- 
haps, the name. Many, questions in the past have been referred to the people 
for their approval or disapproval. The Constitution gives us a right to petition 
Congress and the Legislature in favor or against measures. The initiative and 
referendum is only a more extended use of privileges we now possess and its 
adoption is sure to come. It seems to be a wise method to overfhrow the work 
of corrupt officials and give the people a chance to enact laws in their 
interests." 

Pure Food IJe^slation. 

We congratulate the State Grange upon having secured the enactment 
several years ago of a State oleo law, which, under its vigorous enforcement 
by our present Dairy and Food Commissioner, has proven itself to be highly 
efficient. In this age of food grafters it is highly necessary to have a National 
Pure Food Law establishing uniform regulations in all States. Honest man- 
ufacturers, as well as consumers, are entitled to this protection. - We favor 
striking out the word "knowingly" in the Federal oleo law and insist that no 
reduction be made in the tax upon colored oleo. 

We favor a parcel post, postal savings banks, election of United States 
Senators by a direct vote of the people, and endorse the action of the President 
in his efforts to grant greater powers to the Interstate Commerce Commission 
as was intended when the act was originally passed. There is no subject on 



39 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



which the people are so thoroughly united. We favor the passage of a law 
allowing the manufacture of de-naturalizsd alcohol. We believe there should 
be some changes in our present tariff laws. For instance, can any one give a 
reason why we should have a tariff on lumber and then spend millions for 
forestry ? Permitting our trusts and monopolies to sell cheaper abroad than 
at home ? 

In conclusion, we wish to emphasize the fact that in order to secure the 
needed legislation we must be alert. The appointment of Legislative Commit- 
tees in our Subordinate and Pomona Granges will help us materially. The com- 
mittee extend its thanks 'to the newspapers that have so ably championed the 
measures in which farmers are vitally interested. 



(Signed) 

WILLIAM T. CREASY, Sec. 
E. B. DORSETT. 



The report was adopted as read. 



The Legislative Committee presented the following supplemental report, 
which was adopted seriatim : 

Wheroas, Fruit Growers and Agriculturists of this State have suffered 
much loss and trouble on account of adulterated insecticides, seeds and fruit 
trees not true to name, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we request legislation against adulterated insecticides and 
fungicides, adulterated seeds and fruit trees not true to name. 

H. A. SURFACE, Master, 
W. E. STOVER, Secretary, 
Washington Grange, No. 15 7, Centre County. 

By Committee — 'We believe this is a very good measure and give it our 
unanimous endorsement. Agreed to by State Grange. 

Whei*eas, The election laws of Pennsylvania provide that no person shall 
vote at any election who has not paid a State or county lax within two years; 
and, whereas. Many persons are under this law permitted to vote at and de- 
cide the result of township and municipal elections who have not paid any 
local taxes, therefore. 

Resolved, That London Grove Grange, No. 63, of Chester County, earnestly 
favor such change in the election laws of the State as will make payment of 
township and municipal taxes a necessary qualification for voting at township 
and municipal elections. 

T. L. PASSMORE, Master, 

ELIZABETH HICKS, Sec. 

By the Committee — Report favorable. Recommendation endorsed by 
State Grange. 

Whereas, ^he present purchase of Forest Lands is cumbersome and ex- 
pensive and in many cases works great injustice to .settlers adjoining those 
lands, therefore. 

Resolved, that we request the State Grange Legislative Committee to en- 
deavor to secure such change in the laws as to place a minimum valuation 
of five dollars per acre on all uncultivated land in excess of fifty acres tox each 
farm, such lands in case of non payment of taxes, to be deeded in trust to the 
School Board of the township in which such land is located. The school board 
shall hold said land as forest reserve. 

Resolved, In case of lands owned by the State, the State shall pay the 
same rate of school tax thereon as was paid before its purchase by the State. 

J. W. NELSON. 

By the Committee — The assessors are sworn to assess all lands at their 
full value. There is a law now in regard to taxing forest lands owned by the 
State, passed in the session of 1903. 

Action of the committee sustained by the State Grange. 

Resolvied, that we favor a change in the system of land transfers so that 
the deed will carry a guarantee of title without the necessity of a search as 
.must now be made. 



40 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



This was adopted by Wellsboro Grange, No. 1009, Tioga County, and for- 
warded to Tioga County Pomona Grange. 

It was approved by Tioga County Pomona Grange and forwarded to the 
State Grange. 

' By the Committee — Owing to the fact that this is a new subject the com- 
mittee recommend that it be referred to the Standing Legislative Committee 
and that this committee report on it to the State Grange in the session of 1906. 

Recommendation of the committee approved by the State Grange. 

Whereas, Believing it to be a fact that sundry dealers in oleomargarine 
have been selling the same in violation of law, and, whereas, said dealers when 
apprehended and brought to task have escaped prosecution and punishment 
by falsely declaring that they did not Icnowingly sell, etc.; and, whereas, that 
isaid violators may be prevented from taking advantage of the above plea set- 
forth as a loophole through which to escape prosecution, therefore, be it 

Resolved, by Butler County Pomona Grange in regular session met, that 
we hereby most earnestly and sincerely ask the present Congress to amend 
the act of August 2d, 1886, by striking out of line 16, Section 6, the word, 
"knowingly." 

JACOB ALBERT, 
E. Z. BARTLEY, 

S. L. PAISLEY, 

Committee. 

By the Committee — We report favorably. Adopted. 

A similar resolution was presented from Tioga County. 

Whereas, The present emigration laws admit to this country undesirable 
and criminal persons that commit crimes and All our prisons at great cost to 
the different communities of this country, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of Penfleld Grange No. 1240 that our immi- 
gration laws should be so amended or such legislation should be enacted by 
Congress as will prevent such people from landing on our shores. 

LILLIAN MOREHEAD, Sec. 

By the Committee — ^There Is law prohibiting the admission of criminals. 
We favor more restrictive legislation on foreign immigration. 
Report agreed to. 

Centre County Pomona Grange. 

Centre Hall, Pa., Dec. 11, 1905. 

To the Pennsylvania State Grange, in annual session : 

We respectfully petition your honorable body to enact measures petition- 
ing the State Legislature to enact laws empowering the County Commissioners 
and Board of Township Road Supervisors to construct rural telephone lines, 
with necessary exchanges, along the public roads of the counties and town- 
ships of the State for the purpose of serving the people with an efficient public 
telephone service, with the full privilege of any citizen to attach any approved 
telephone instrument at an even nominal toll for the use of the public line 
and exchanges owned by the county and local governments. 

Resolved, That the State Grange be empowered to appoint a special com- 
mittee friendly to the project to prepare Bills and present the same at the 
next regular session of the State Legislature for enactment into law, establish- 
ing a public telephone system. 

D. M. CAMPBELL, Sec. 

GEORGE DALE, Master. 

By the Committee — ^We believe the building of rui-al telephones could be 
done by the State in place of spending nearly half a million of dollars an- 
nually on a useless State Constabulary. t 

Report agreed to. 

By the Committee (on the following) — The Grange has for years favored 
a parcels post. Adopted. 

At a meeting of Carpenter Grange, No. 454, held Dec. 7th, the following 
resolutions were unanimously adopted : 



41 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAIL SESSION OP THE 



WTiCTcas, The needs of a parcel post National in extent has been fully and 
ably set forth by the National Grange in its session at Atlantic City; and, 
whereas, the great increase in rural free delivery and farmers' telephones 
make it doubly desirable to have a parcels post, local in extent, therefore be it 

Resolved, That we petition the State Grange to use its powerful influence 
to have a law enacted by Congress as a first step to a National post and a part 
thereof that shall provide that a parcel weighing not over 2 5 pounds may be 
mailed to any point in the county in which it is mailed, or to a county ad- 
jacent thereto at the same rate accorded newspapers, to wit : one cent per 
pound. • 

J. W. McILWAIN, Master, 

MAUD HOPKINS, Sec. 

By the Commttee (on the following) — ^Endorsed except as to the time of 
holding the primary elections. Adopted. 

At a regular meeting of Paradise Grange, No. 854, in session Dec. 8, 1905, 
the following resolutions were adopted to be submitted to the legislative com- 
mittee of our State Grange : 

Resolved : 1, That we recommend to our legislators the enactment of a 
general primary election law, according to which the primary elections of all 
political parties in our State shall be held together and under one electon 
board as is the case in our final elections now. Also, that these primary elec- 
tions be held, for the spring election, on the first Saturday after the first Mon- 
day in February; and for the fail elections on the first Saturday after the first 
Monday in June. 

2, That we recommend the revision of our tax laws to the effect that the 
money raised by personal tax and liquor tax remain to be applied in the dis- 
trict or municipality in which it is raised. 

MATILDA NORRIS, Sec. 

R. F. D. No. 3, Reynoldsville, Jefferson County, Pa. 

At a meeting of Carpenter Grange, No. 454, held Dec. 7, the following 
resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

"Wlicreas, The road laws of the State of Pennsylvania now provide for 
State aid only for roads of the most expensive character and beyond the needs 
of very many of the roads of the Commonwealth, and recognizing the fact 
that most of the public roads are poorly laid out and badly made, and are 
capable of great improvement, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grange that tlie State sohuld aid 
under State supervision for roads of different grades, and would recommend 
that the roads be divided into three classes — roads of the first class to be the 
standard road now being made; roads of the second class to be stone roads, 
but only wide enough for one track with earthen turnouts; and roads of the 
third class to be gravel or shale roads.; all of said roads to be relaid and built 
to a grade under the supervision of the bureau of public highways. 

Resolved, That the State Grange be earnestly requested to talk the matter 
up and agitate the matter so that at the election of a new Legislature, men 
favorable to the enactment of such a law may be nominated and elected and 
the aid of the State extend to all the people instead of the few and wealthy 
as at present. 

J. W. McILWAIN, Master, 

MAUp HOPKINS, Sec. 

By the Committee — The facts henein contained are embodied in the gen- 
eral report of the Legislative Committee. Action sustained. 

Corry, Pa., Dec. 7th, 1905. 

Whereas, the butter and dairy interests being the leading and principal 
occupation of the majority of the farmers of Erie County, 

Whereas, We are compelled to come in competition with the illegal sale 
of oleomargarine and renovated butter in the marketing of our products to 
such an extent that the margin of profit is almost obliterated, 

Whereas, The State Dairy and Food Commissioner has rendered our 
members and the members of Erie County Farmers' and Dairymens' Associa- 
tions invaluable assistance which is duly appreciated, we see and know the 
duties of the present deputies are so varied and extended that we do not, as 
yet, have the necessary close attention we should have in the protection of our 
Dairy Industry, therefore, be it 



42 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Resolved, That this Pomona Grange designate by an election J. P. Wade 
to fill the duties of a special deputy for Erie County with reasonable pay only 
for the time actually employed in the protection of our interests. 

Resolved, That this petition be presented to the Governor, Secretary of 
Agriculture and the Dairy and Food Commissioner of our Commonwealth, for 
the appointment of the above designated person for the protection of our in- 
terests as they may hereafter appear. All of which is respectfully submitted. 

DBLIVAN KITTS, 

E. E. KENNEDY, 

J. BAILEY, 

Committee. 

ARCHIE BILLINGS, Master. 
E. ESTELLA KENNEDY, Sec. 

Above resolution not within jurisdiction of Legislative Committee, and 
direct people of Erie County to apply to State Secretary of Agriculture for 
assistance in redressing their grievances. 

Your committee of fifty-nine appointed to devise means for meeting the 
opposition recently manifested to the ofl?ice of Dairy and Food Commissioner, 
and to formulate a demand for such legislation as may best subserve the .in- 
terests of Agriculture in our State, beg leave to submit for your consideration 
the following open letter wTiich we recommetid shall be sent to each subordi- 
nate Grange and other farmers' organizations in the State as well as to the 
newspapers published within the Commonwealth : 

The State Grange of Pennsylvania convened in annual session at Sunbury, 
Pennsylvania, on this 14th day of December, A. D., 1905, feeling that the time 
has come when the farmers of the State of Pennsylvania should make a united 
effort to secure just legislation upon certain subjects which will prove helpful 
not only to the interests of farmers and the people dwelling in the rural dis- 
tricts, but also to a. great majority of the people of the Commonwealth, do 
hereby make known their purpose to insist upon the passage of the following 
legislation at the next regular session of the General Assembly of the State : 

In view of recent decisions of the Supreme and other Courts concerning 
the sale of adulterated liquors and food commodities, we would recommend 
that our general assembly at its next session shall so amend existing laws as 
to properly protect the honest manufacturers and consumers as was originally 
intended by those acts. 

Believing that it is unjust to discriminate between transportation com- 
panies, using electric or other power than steam in moving their cars by de- 
priving them of the right to carry freight, and believing that it would be 
helpful to the farmers of the State as well as all who dwell in rural districts, 
if such discrimination were prevented by law, we ask for legislation conferring 
upon what is known as trolley roads, or railways, the right to carry and trans- 
port whatever may now under the laws of the State be carried or transported 
by any of the railroads operated within this Commonwealth. 

Believing that under the revenue laws now in force real estate is bearing 
a much larger share of the burden of taxation than is just, we ask for such a 
revision of the revenue laws of the State as shall make all kinds of property, 
personal, corporate and real, pay an equal share of all taxes, State, county 
and municipal, that are levied upon the citizens of the Commonwealth. 

Believing that a very large number of prosecutions for trifling offenses 
are returned by justices of the peace to the Court of Quarter Sessions, which 
would be settled before said justices and never appear in Court, if the Act of 
1878, providing for the payment of costs in all cases of misdemeanors, were 
repealed; and believing that greater good would result from such settlement 
of trivial cases, while a very great saving to the taxpayers of the several 
counties would be secured, we ask for the repeal of said act. 

Believing publicity to be one of the most efficient means of suppressing 
evil, and knowing the good that has been done and that may be done in the 
future, by the public press, in exposing wrong doing, either in public or private 
life, and believing that the laws exsting prior to the enactment of what is 
known as the "Press Muzzier" passed by the General Assembly of 1903; were 
sufficient to protect the good name of all citizens of the Commonwealth, and 
that the passage of said act was therefore (Superfluous and unnecessary, we 
ask that it be repealed. 



-'? 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



L 



The cost of administering our State and local governments is increasing 
at an alarming rate. One of the causes of this increase in the cost of govern- 
ment is due to our loose methods of nominating and electi^ng officials from 
auditor up to the President. One great menace that we Tiave to contend with 
is the growing use of money to secure the nomination and election of public 
officials. If public positions are to be auctioned off to the highest bidder, it 
demoralizes the public services. Venal and incompetent officials use the pub- 
lic services to enrich themselves at the expense of the taxpayers, and is the 
primal cause of the great distrust in tbe honesty of administration of our 
local and State affairs. 

The change that this committee recommends is that we have a regular 
Australian ballot, that is, a ballot with the names of all candidates printed in 
groups under heads of the different offices to be filled, instructing voters to 
mark one or mark two as the case may be. These tickets should be printed 
by the commissioners as at present and sent to election officers. 

Under the requirements of the Constitution blank spaces must be left on 
each ticket in order not to restrict the choice of the vofer. 

In addition to furnishing tickets to election officers at as present, any 
voter should be allowed to secure these tickets, say four or five days before the 
election. This would give every person a chance to fix his ticket at home. 

At the polls the election officers would hand the voter a ticket if he de- 
sired it. But the one thing that the officers must give to the voter and to no 
one else would be an official envelope. The voter would then go into the booth, 
close the curtain and put his ticket into the envelope and seal it, and under no 
conditions should any help be allowed the voter. He then would place Tils 
ballot in the box. The booth, of course, must be retained. Other proper 
safe-guards in the nature of penalties, etc, should be a part of this ballot law. 

This method would do away with buying votes; it would allow people to 
make their tickets as they thought best, and in short, would combine all the 
good features of the old and new laws on voting. 

We favor a new primary election law along the same lines. 

And naw to the end that such legislation may be secured, we urge upon 
all members of Subordinate Granges in the State, as well as all other persoriiS 
interested in any of the various branches of agriculture, to insist that candi- 
dates for membership in the next General Assembly shall declare tlieir pur- 
pose to support, if elected, such measures, before casting their votes for them 
either at party primaries or at the general election. We urge also that candi- 
dates for the several State offices, to be voted for at the next general electi6n, 
be requested either by themselves, or by the platforms of the parties placing 
them in nomination, to declare their purpose to support such measures; and 
we further urge that members of our order as well as all others interested in ag- 
riculture and agricultural pursuits, shall refuse to cast their votes for any can- 
didate that fails by either one or the other of the above methods to make such 
purposes known. 

COMMITTEE : 

W. G. EMiBREE, Chairman. 

By the Legislative Committee — We recommend the adoption of the f(>re- 
going report. 

Recommendations of the Committee sustained by the State Grange. 
To the officers and members of the Pennsylvania State^ Grange : 

Whei-ieas, An act to provide for the more effectual protection of th§T)ublic 
health in the several municipalities of this Commonwealth as recorded in the 
Laws of Pennsylvania, 18 95, page 203 to 209 and approved by Daniel Hastings; 
and, whereas, section 12 of said act requires Principals, etc., to exclude the ad- 
mission to school of all children not vaccinated or that have not had small pox, 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the attempt to enforce said section of said act is an in- 
justice to the patrons of the schools and is ruining them, and that the en- 
forcement in rural communities where a case of small pox never existed ia 
unnecessary, uncalled for and unjust, therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we ask the co-operation and aid of the Pennsylvania State 
Grange to do all in its power to have the law repealed or amended. 

Adopted at a regular meeting of Shiloh Grange, No. 927. 

M. L. BOLLES, 

F. L. POSSINGER, 

^'' JACOB LOGAN, 

Legislative Committee. 



44 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



A similar resolution was adopted and forwarded by Warren County Po- 
mona Grange, as follows : 

Wliereas, After careful consideration we have come to the conclusion, 

1st, That the compulsory vaccination law is not in accordance with Art. 
1, Sec. 1, of our State Constitution; 

2d, That small pox, properly treated is not a dangerous disease; 

3d, That vaccination does not prevent small pox but, that it causes many 
disease' and often ending in death; 

4th, That it is a sin to poison the pure blood of a child with the virus 
obtained from a beast; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we appeal to our assemblymen and to the State depart- 
ment of education to have the compulsory vaccination law repealed. 

HENRY MACK,, Master, 
J. B. THOMPSON, Sec. 

By the Committee — The arbitrary method that the Department of Health 
is pursuing in attempting to enforce said act is an injustice to the patrons of 
our schools and results in great injury. We recommend also that this crude 
and unjust law be amended. 

Adopted by the State Grange. 

THE CENTRE COUNTY POMONA GRANGE No. 13 

Patrons of Husbandry. 

Centre Hall, Pa., Dec. 11, 1905. 
To the Pennsylvania State Grange in annual session at Sunbury : 

Enclosed herewith find statistical tables giving a statement of the ex- 
penditures for the administration of all governmental affairs of the Common- 
wealth, embodying the government of the State, counties, cities, boroughs and 
townships; also giving statement of the average mill rate of taxation imposed 
upon the different classes of property. These statements show a gross dis- 
crimination against real estate holders, whether owners or tenants, in the 
city or country, which discrimination the Legislative and Executive Depart- 
ments of the Commonwealth should speedily correct, 

The farmers of Centre County, through the Pomona Grange, respectfully 
ask your careful investigation of the enclosed tables and if your honorable 
body concurs with the enclosed conclusions, they respectfully invite your cor- 
dial co-operation in creating a public sentiment to correct the unjust and op- 
pressive burdens imposed upon the farms and homes of the state. 

How the Tax Account Stands in Pennsylvania. 

The aggregate appraised value of real estate in Pennsylvania is $2,986,- 
197,041.00. 

The taxes paid by real estate is $47,975,075.76. Average rate of taxEution 
on real estate, 15 2-3 mills. ' 

Appraised value of personal and corporate property for taxation $5,301,- 
576,287.00. 

Taxes paid on personal and corporate property after deducting commis- 
sions, licenses and other miscellaneous sources of income, leaves a tax on 
personal and corporate property of $14,963,156.72. Average rate of taxation 
on personal and corporate property, 3 mills. 

How the Account Would Stand if Taxes Were Ijevled Equitably 

If personal and corporate property were taxed at the same mill rate that 
real estate is taxed, personal and corporate property would be required to pay 
$31,985,431.27, instead of $14,903,156.72. 

If we credit to personal and corporate property, commissions, licenses and 
other miscellaneous sources of income, amounting to $6,067,174.88, the total 
chare would be $46,948,587.99. 

How the Account Would Stand With Real Estate. 

If taxes were collected equitably, real estate would be required to pay 
$29,861,970.41, instead of $47,975,075.67, or a savirig to the real estate owners 
of $18,113,105.26. ^-- 



45 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



Tax Laws of Pennsylvania Rob Real Estate Owners. 

The real estate owners are annually grossly robbed of $18,113,105.26 
Eight millions of this amount is directly robbed from the farmers, and 
ten millions from residents in cities and towns, whether they be owners or 
tenants. It is this policy of the State that is especially the cause of the de- 
preciation of farm property, as according to the last census report there was 
a decline in valuation during the last decade of $23,000,000.00. This policy 
has driven away from the farms and rural communities, according to the 
same report, over one hundred thousand people from twenty-two counties of 
the State, 

If the State treated the agricultural classs with justice and equity the 
farmers would be contented in their vocation, and Pennsylvania would have 
prosperous and happy agricultural communities, the mainstay of prosperity 
to all our industrial interests. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE DALE, Master Centre County Grange 
D. M. CAMPBELL, Secretary Centre County Grange 
> LEONARD RHONE, Past Master of the State Grange 
G. L. GOODHART, Ex-officio Member State Grange 
GEO. GINGERICH, Ex-offlcio Member State Grange 
D. K. KELLER, Ex-officio, Member State Grange 
WILLARD DALE. Ex-offlcio Member State Grange 

Committee. 

Centre Hall, Pa., Dec. 11, 1905. 

Tabulated statement of the expenditures for the administration of all 
governmental affairs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, with a detailed 
summary estimated appraised value of real estate, personal and corporate 
property, salaries and occupations, the amount of taxes paid by each subject, 
with the average mill rate of taxation. Compiled from the official reports of 
the Commonwealth, by Committee of Members of the Centre County Pomona 
Grange in Pennsylvania. 

GEORGE DALE, Master Centre County Grange 
D. M. CAMPBELL, Secretary Centre County Grange 
LEONARD RHONE, Past Master of the State Grange 
G, L. GOODHART, Ex-offlcio Member State Grange 
GEO. GINGERICH, Ex-offlcio Member State Grange 
D. K. KELLER, Ex-offlcio, Member State Grange 
WILLARD DALE. Ex-offlcio Member State Grange 

Committee. 
TABLE A. 

Statement of aggregate taxes collected for all governmental purposes 
within the Commonwealth, per report Secretary Internal Affairs and report 
Auditor General, 1903 : 

Aggregate taxes collected for the division of 

the division of the State Government $ 21,030;232.60 

Aggregate taxes collected for the support of 

the County Governments 23,722,444.60 

Aggregate taxes collected for the support of 
City, Borough and Township Governments, 
viz : for schools, not including State Ap- 
propriation $ 17,430,239.00 

Collected for construction and repair of 

streets, roads, and bridges 11,132,517.00 

Taxes collected for support of poor 3,432,179.00 

Taxes collected for miscellaneous purposes in 
cities, boroughs and townships 
deducting county expenditures, $23,722,444, 
as above 10,011,671.68 

Aggregate taxes collected for support of town- 
ships, cities and borough $42,006,606.68 42,006,606.68 

Aggregate taxes collected for all governmental 

purposes within the Commonwealth $86,759,283.88 



46 



PE3NNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Aggregate taxes collected for the support of the State Govern- 
ment proper $ 21,030,232.60 

Aggregate taxes collected for support of county 23,722,444.60 

Aggregate taxes collected for support of Townships and 

Boroughs 42,006,606.68 

TABLE B. 

Aggregate revenues collected by the Commonwealth for the support of the 
State Government proper. Report Auditor General, 1903, Pages 1, 2, and 3, 
giving a separate statement of each subject of taxation with amounts paid on 
corporations, banks, trust companies, building and loan associations, personal 
property, municipal and county loans, etc. 

Page 1 

Taxes on national bank stock $ 659,041.69 

Tax on State banks 93,738.66 

Tax on incorporated savings institutions 48,767.55 

Tax on trust companies 830,069.97 

Tax on building and loan associations 13,931.18 

Tax on capital stock of corporations . 6,156,357.88 

Tax on loans 1,416,881.12 

Tax on gross receipts 1,095,351.22 

Tax on gross premiums 61,966.10 

Tax on bogus charters 1,138,221.27 

Tax on personal property 3,176,403.27 

Tax on loans county 163,707.47 

Tax on loans, municipal 108,619,34 — 14,963,156.72 

Revenues collected on commissions, page 2 

Commissions on writs, wills, deeds, etc 181,732.10 

Commissions on Colateral inheritance 1,300,834.76 

Commissions on notary public 36,200.00 

Commissions on gross receipts of banks and 

brokers 58,383.45 

Commissions on sale of fertilizers 19,015.00 

Commissions on notarial gross receipts 4,069.73 

Commissions on foreign Insurance Cos 1,001,154.66 — 2,601,389.70 

Interest on State deposits and sale of 
pamphlet laws 

General fund 196.555.90 

Sinking fund 74,808.09 

Pamphlet laws ... T 363.26 — 271,727.25 

Receipts from licenses, page 2 

Retail merchantile license 646,991.88 

Wholesale merchantile license 250,295.27 

Retail liquor license 598,546.74 

Wholesale liquor license 510,129.31 

Brewers' license 261,514.25 

Distillers' license 43,500.65 

Bottlers' license 157,225.74 

Billiard license 64,852,58 

Brokers' license 36,260.93 

Auctioneers' license 16,231.54 

Peddlers' license 4,898.86 

Theatre license 16,877.48 

Eating house license 31,923.18 

Oleomargarine license, page 3. . . . 38,294.54 

Renovated butter license 225.00 

Pishing license 2;818.00 

Hunting license 426.07 — 2,681,011.02 

From other sources, page 3 

Fines 42,580.31 

Refunded cash 5,248.13 

Fees of State officers 251,738.49 

Escheats 5,048.20 

Allegheny "Valley Railroad 132,500.00 

Annuities fQr right of way 10,000.00 

Penalties 45.35 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



Lands 5,792.81 

Accrued interest 1,537.01 

U. S. Government money refunded 45,239.90 

Conscience money 394.20 

Miscellaneous sources 12,922.51 — 513,046.91 

Total State receipts $ 21,030,232.60 

RECAPITULATION. 

Collected from Corporations $ 14,963,156.72 

Collected as commissions 2,601,389.70 

Interest on deposit and sales and sinking fund 271,727.25 

Collected from licenses 2,681,011.02 

From Miscellaneous sources 513,046.91 

TABLE C. 

Statement of revenues collected for City, County and Borough purposes 
and the sources from which they were derived, including the State appropria- 
tions, Report Sec. Int. Affairs and Aud. Gen., 1903. 
Appraised value of real estate taxable, $2,986,- 

197,041, and taxes paid TAXES $ 47,975,075.67 

Appraised value of salaries, emoluments of of- 
fice, posts of profits, trades and occupations, 

$151,950,199 $ 1,800,011.00 

Appraised value of horses, mules and cattle, 

$39,978,192. Taxes paid 148,354.00 

Collected from retail liquor licenses local - 3,500,000.00 — 5,448,365.00 

Revenues derived from State appropriations 
and returned to the counties and local gov- 
ernments 

Salaries Judges Common Pleas Court 477,415.31 

Salaries Judges Separate Orphans' Court 75,361.80 

Salaries Associate Judges 28,095.40 

Appropriation for care of indigent insane 1,042,706.13 

Appropriation for charitable institutions 2,429,133.06 

Appropriation for charitable homes 128.340.27 

Appropriation for charitable societies 18,578.84 

Personal property tax returned 2,056,656.39 

Appropriation for salaries county school su- 
perintendents 140,679.75 

Appropriation school deficiency act 226,836.12 

Appropriation for schools 4,8i20,423.10 

Appropriation for township high schools 23,698.00 

Appropriation for publishing call to elect 

county superintendents 34.95 

Refunded to counties, bonus, right of way, for- 
eign railroads ' 10,000.00 

Foreign fire insurance premiums, one half re- 
turned to boroughs 105,217.04 

Paid to counties for extinguishing forest fires 9,135.46 

Appropriation for rebuilding county bridges. . 663,244.99 — 12,305,610.61 

$ 65,729,057.67 
RECAPITULATION. 

Aggregate appraised value of real estate taxable for county, 

city, borough and township purposes $ 2,986,197,041.00 

Aggregate taxes collected from real estate as per above 
statement, after deducting taxes on occupations, retail 
liquor licenses, and State appropriations to county, city 
borough and township governments. 47,975,075.6'i 

Average rate of taxation FIFTEEN MILLS 



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49 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



RECAPITULATION. 

Estimated appraised value of Personal and Corporate 
property, making returns for taxation 

Taxes collected from Personal and Corporate property. . . 

Average rate of taxation on personal and Corporate 
property 



$5,301,576,278.00 
14,963,156.72 

THREE MILLS. 



On motion it was directed that the general report of the Legislative Com- 
mittee be presented to the press for publication and that 2000 copies be 
printed for distribution. 



Grange closed at 4:40, p. m. 



W. F. HILL, 
JACKSON GROVE. 
FRANK MORROW, 
J. P. GIPFORD, 
E. G. ROGERS, 
L. E. BOYER, 
E. B. DOR'SETT, 
W. T. CREASY, 



WEDNESDA Y E VENING. 

The evening was given to degree work. The -State Grange was opened 
in full form by Worthy Master Hill in the Sixth Degree. 

During the intermission the following brothers and sisters had been 
obligated in the Ffth Degree : 

NAME 

Laura Ehrgott, 

W. L. Musser, 

J. S. Campbell, 

Howard Murray, 

J. A. Smith, 

Mrs. M. P. Smith, 

W. E. Baldwin, 

J. H. Weaver, 

J. M. Perrin, 

Sarah Ruswell 

Arthur Roswell, 

X(. O. Prince, 

Jennie Moyer 

D. G. Moyer, 

Ro,se Carl 

William D. Hixon, 

Grace Koon, 

W. J. Koon, 

Ralph A. Eroh, 

G. Prank Haag, 

Mrs. Katurah Deim, 

H. J. Deim, 

Mrs. E, J. Cunningham, 

B. J. Cunningham 
William Hortan Layman 
Mrs. Zibia M. Kline, 
Kliza J. Bockus, 
A. O. Lewis, 
Philander Bockus 
Mrs. Anna E. Ingram, 

C. P. Bertch, 
Mrs. E. D Kingsley, 
Dorsey N. VanKnew, 
JSarah L. Kepple, 



No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY. 


746 


MeadviMe. 


Crawford, 


1226 


Huntingdon, 


Huntingdon. 


108 


Orangeville, 


Columbia. 


249 


Potts Grove, 


Northumberland. 


735 


Sligo, R. D. No. 


1, Clarion. 


735 


Sligo, R. D. No. 


1, Clarion. 


1264 


Embreeville, 


Chester. 


1283 


Mahaffey, 


Clearfield. 


691 


Hazen, 


Jefferson. 


135 


Randolph, 


Crawford. 


135 


Randolph, 


Crawford. 


1248 


Shingle House, 


Potter. 


1148 


Green Briar, 


Northumberland. 


1148 


Green Briar, 


Northumberland. 


1128 


Dysart, R. F. D 


Cambria. 


419 


Dawson, 


Fayette. 


538 


Hadley, 


Mercer. 


538 


HaC'ley, , 


Mercer. 


1032 


Weatherly, 


Carbon. 


534 


Grampian, 


Clearfield. 


1241 


MahHffey, R. D. 


No. 1 Clearfield. 


1241 


Mahaffty, R. D. 


No. 1 Clearfield. 


1222 


Home Camp 


Clearfield. 


1222 


Home Camp, 


Clearfield. 


205 


New Albany, R.D. 47, Bradford. 


808 


Du Bois, 


Clearfield. 


54 


Wellsboro, R. D. 


No. 5, Tioga. 


1194 


Wellsboro, R, D, 


No. 5, Tioga. 


54 


„ Genesee, 


Potter. 


974 


Spruce Creek, 


Huntingdon. 


1193 


North Fork, 


Potter. 


918 


Mansfield, R. D. 


No. 2, Tioga. 


354 


Rummersfipld, 


Bradford. 


862 


New Alexandria, 


Westmoreland. 



60 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



NAME 

Carrie A. Tompkin, 
James Murphy, 
S. W. Dunn, 
Rebecca E. Smith, 
Kate Lewis, 
Jessie Ha,ll, 
Orange L. Hall, 
Willis E. Soper 
Mrs. W. E. Soper, 
Lizzie Fiscus, 
R.L . Campbell, 
J. I. Allshouse, 
Mrs. H. W. Pollock, 
H. W. Pollock, 
John A. Foster, 
Sallie J. Worrell, 



No. POST OFFICE 

1203 Harrison Valley, 

1144 Smock, 

1052 Vanderbilt, R.D.No.' 27, 

507 Buckmanville, 

1194 Genesee, 

1254 Keating Summit, 

1254 Keating Summit, 

174 Wellsburg, N. Y., R. D. 

174 Wellsburg, N. Y., R. D. 

515 Cochran Mills, 

570 West Sunbury, R.D. 49, 

770 Brookville, 

131 Mill Village, 

131 Mill Village, 

1071 Cherry Ridge, 

1173 Media, 



COUNTY. 

Potter. 

Fayette. 

Fayette. 

Bucks. 

Potter. 

Potter. 

Potter. 

No. 55 

No. 55 

Armstrong. 

Butler. 

JefEersom. 

Erie. 

Erie. 

Wayne. 

Delaware. 



The court was fully equal to any former effort. At this time the Sixth 
Degree was conferred in full form upon the following Sisters and Br.others : 

NAMiE 

1 John G. McHenry, 

2 R. H. Mickelson 

3 R. P. Ripley, 

4 B. R. Ramsey, 

5 G. Frank Haag, 

6 Bertha Dodd, 

7 C. N. Dodd. 

8 Eliza Tingley, 

9 O. C. Tingley, 

10 T. E. Moore, 

11 J. W. Wallace, 

12 N. B. Shaffer, 

13 C. J. Rockwell, 

14 C. P. Bertch, 

15 Mrs. Geo, Eagley, 

16 Geo. Eagley, 

17 W. M. Foust, 

18 Joel Baker, 

19 A, Z. Mason, 

20 Mrs. A. Z, Mason, 

21 Rose Carl, 

22 Mrs. Rose KirsOh, 

23 Chas. C. Bowser, 

24 E. M, Dinger, 

25 Stanley Mosier, 

26 W. H. Van Fleet, 
2 7 M. V. Sperry, 

28 C. C. Bicker, 

29 Justin Fuller. 

30 Margaret Boyer, 

31 L. E. Boyer, 

32 P. S. Ion, 

33 J. H. Weaver, 

34 John A. Foster, 

35 Frank N. Morrow, 

36 Jennie C. Moyer, 

37 D. G. Moyer, 
28 J. M. Perin, 

39 Howard Murray, 

40 Sarah Roswell, 

41 Arthur Roswell, 

42 J. F. Whited, 

43 Mrs. R. J. Weld, 

44 J. F. Taylor, 

45 B. J. Mead, 

46 W. L. Mosser, 

47 Laura Ehrgott, 



No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY. 


88 


Bentoi^ 


Columbia. 


1068 


Tidioute. 


Warren. 


84 


Covington, 


Tioga. 


908 


Evans City, 


Butler. 


534 


Grampian, 


Clearfield. 


875 


Corry, 


Erie. 


875 


Corry, 


Erie. 


289 


New Milford, 


Susquehanna. 


289 


New Milford, 


Susquehanna. 


291 


Berwick, R.D. 1, 


Columbia. 


1199 


Factoryville. R.D. 


1, Lackawana. 


96 


Centre Hall, 


Centre. 


152 


Hop Bottom, 


Susquehanna. 


1193 


North Fork, 


Potter. 


1257 


North Springfield, 


Erie. 


1257 


North Springfield, 


Erie. 


1160 


Muncy, 


Lycoming. 


1244 


Montgomery, 


Erie. 


182 


Troy, 


Bradford. 


182 


Troy, 


Bradford. 


1228 


Dysart. R.F.D. 


Cambria. 


1121 


Nicktown, 


Cambria. 


737 


Osterburg, 


Bedford. 


551 


Cocalico, 


Lancaster. 


930 


Dallas, 


Luzerne. 


1199 


Factoryville, R.D. 


2 Wyoming. 


263 


Conneautville, 


Crawford. 


1255 


McElhattan, 


Clinton. 


1208 


Kinzua, 


Warren. 


914 


James Creek, 


Huntingdon. 


914 


James Creek, 


Huntingdon, 


563 


Day, 


Clarion. 


1283 


Mahaffey, 


Clearfield. 


1071 


Cherry Ridge, 


Wayne. 


251 


Shultzville, 


Lackawanna. 


1148 


Green Briar, 


Northumberland. 


1148 


Green Briar, 


Northumberland, 


691 


Hazen, 


JefCerson. 


249 


Potts Grove, 


Northumberland. 


135 


Randolph, 


Crawford. 


135 


Randolph, 


Crawford. 


1209 


Friendsville, 


Susquehanna. 


847 


Sugar Grove, 


Warren. 


1071 


Cherry Ridge, 


Wayne. 


584 


Clearfield. 


Clearfield. 


1226 


Huntingdon, 


Huntingdon. 


764 


Meadville. 


Crawford. 



51 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL, SESSION OP THE 



NlAME No. 

48 W. E. Baldwin, 1263 

49 C. Buckley, 1033 

50 L. O. Prince, 1248 

51 H. B. Aikman, 56 

52 J. M. Welsh, 128 

53 J. S. Campbell, 108 

54 C. E. Mix, 839 

55 R. W. Van Horn, 108 

56 W. D. Hixon, 419 

57 Mrs. A. C. Creasy, 56 

58 A. C. Creasy, 56 

59 Mrs. B. E. Rockwell. 155 

60 B. E. Rockwell, 155 

61 Frances DeVilder, 1101 

62 Mrs. C. A. Sisk, 1245 

63 C. H. Jennings, 272 

64 W. J. Koon, 538 

65 Grace Koon, 538 

66 Jessie Ikler. 52 
6 7 James Scott McLaughlin, 781 
68 Mrs. C. D. Kingsley, 918 
6 9 Sallie J. Warrell, 1173 

70 Charity V. Slifer, 434 

71 Rebecca E. Smith, 507 

72 Wm. Slippey, 510 

73 Sarah L. Kepple, 862 

74 David H. Kepple, 862 

75 Emma Deewall, 1244 

76 W. H. Meredith, 628 

77 C. F. Taylor, 1174 

78 Harry E. Aspey, 800 

79 Martin Morgan, 1042 

80 W. H. Lyman, 205 

81 Joseph Seylor, 964 

82 W. E. Soper, • 174 
8 3 Mrs. W. E. Soper, 174 

84 Henry Heaton, 151 

85 Mrs. B. J. Hopkins, 1207 

86 J S. Hopkins, 1270 

87 Lizzie Fiscus, 515 

88 R. J. Fitzsimmons,, 1290 
8 9 Mrs. Jessie A. Hall, 1254 

90 O. L. Hall, 1254 

91 Geo. E. VanEtten, 931 

92 Mrs. Carrie Tompkins, 1203 

93 Mrs. C. H. Holcome, 1236 

94 C. H. Holcome, 1236 

95 Mrs. W. E. Sawyer, 1182 

96 W. E. Sawyer, 1182 

97 W. H. Minnlch, 1242 

98 H. Clara Morley, 111 

99 C. S. Bates, 1074 

100 Mrs. George Peters, 378 

101 George Peters, 378 

102 Mrs. Julia M. Kline, 808 

103 S. W. Dunn, 1052 

104 Dorsey M. VanHuren, 354 

105 H. F. Cox. 664 

106 James Humplirey, 1144 

107 Wm. S. Leighty, 1137 

108 Mrs. Frinnie Glasgow, 664 

109 Mrs. W. B. Galley, 1164 

110 H. J. Butler, 1253 

111 H. S. Wertz, 1154 

112 Horace F. Smith, 507 

113 George W. Henrie. 128 

114 Annie Henrie, 128 

115 Mrs. Annie E. Ingram, 974 

116 Frances Lyon, 1018 

117 J. H. Moyer, 68 



POST OFFICE 

Embreeville, 

Stony Fork, 

Shingle House, 

Lime Ridge, 

Orangeville, 

Orangeville, 

Sugar Grove, 

Robrsburg, 

Dawson, 

Bloomsburg, 

Bloomsburg, 

Troy, R.D. 56, 

Troy, R.D. 56, 

Miola. 

Factoryville, 

Towanda, 

Hadley, 

Had ley, 

Millville, 

Port Royal, 

Mansfield, R.D. 2, 

Media, 

Lewisburg, 

Buckmanville, 

Hollidaysburg, 

New Alexandria, 

New Alexandria, 

Montgomery, R.D., 2 

Kersey, 

Weedville, 

Saegertown, 

Scandia, 

New Albany, 

Luthersburg, 

Columbia X Roads, 

Columbia X Roads, 

Rolan, 

Newfield 

Newfleld 

Cochran Mills, 

Brookville, 

Keating Summit, 

Keating Summit, 

Lenoxville, 

Harrison Valley, 

Turtle Point, 

Turtle Point, 

Port Allegheny, R.D. 

Port Allegheny, R.D. 

Hegins, 

Athens, 

Dyberry, 

Beech Creek. 

Beech Creek, 

DuBois, 

Vanderbilt, 

Rummerfleld, 

Bellwood, 

Smock, 

Duncansville, R.D. 2, 

Bellwood. 

Pinleyville, 

Ceres, 

Duncanville, 

Buckmanville, 

Orangeville, 

Orangeville, 

Spruce Creek, 

Unlondale, 

Muncy. 



COUNTY. 

Chester. 

Tioga. 

Potter. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Warren. 

Columbia. 

Fayette. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Bradford. 

Bradford. 

Clarion* 

Wyoming. 

Bradford. 

Meroer. 

Mercer. 

Columbia. 

Juniata. 

Tioga. 

Delaware. 

Union 

Bucks. 

Blair. 

Westmoreland. 

Westmoreland. 

2, Lycoming. 

Elk. 

Elk. 

Crawford. 

Warren. 

Bradford. 

Clearfield. 

Bradford. 

Bradford. 

Centre. 

Potter. 

Potter. 

Armstrong. 

Jefferson. 

Potter. 

Potter. 

Susquehanna. 

Potter. 

McKean. 

McKean. 

2, McKean. 

2, McKean, 

Schuylkill. 

Bradford. 

Wayne. 

Clinton. 

Clinton. 

Clearfield. 

Fayette, 

Bradford. 

Blair. 

Fayette. 

Blair. 

Blair. 

Washington. 

New York. 

Blair. 

Bucks. 

Columbia. 

Columbia. 

Huntingdon. 

Susquehanna. 

Lycoming:. 



52 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 





NiAME 


No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY. 




118 


John Shoner, 


1256 


McKeansburg, 


Schuylkill. 


1 


119 


Hannah D. Hibbs, 


684 


Hulmville, 


Bucks 


■} 


120 


Samuel Hibbs, 


684 


Hulmville, 


Bucks 


I 


121 


R. E. Coleman, 


1242 


Hegins, 


Cchuylkill. 


122 


Mrs. Laura Aikman, 


56 


Lime Ridge, 


Columbia. 


;,i 


123 


Robert R. Harris, 


56 


Light Street, 


Columbia. 


i 


124 


S. S. Kline, 


808 


DuBois, 


Clearfield. 


1 


125 


Eliza J. Bockus, 


54 


Wellsboro, R.D. 5, 


Tioga. 


■? 


126 


Philander Bockus, 


54 


Wellsboro, R.D. 5, 


Tioga. 




127 


C. D. Eisaman, 


835 


Greensburg, R.D. 


2, Westmoreland. 




128 


E. J. Cunningham, 


1222 


Home Camp, 


Clearfield 




129 


Mrs. E. J.. Cunningham, 


1222 


Home Camp, 


Clearfield. 




130 


Kate Lewis, 


1194 


Genesee, R.D.I, 


. Potter. 




131 


A, O. Lewis, 


1194 


Genesee, R.D.I, 


Potter. 




132 


Ralph A. Eroh, 


1032 


Weather ly. 


Carbon. 




133 


Maggie E. Bullers, 


609 


Kirkman, 


Jefferson. 




134 


E. E. Bullers, 


609 


Kirkman, 


Jefferson. 




135 


J. C. Hoyt, 


1285 


Penfield, D.P.D. 1, 


Clearfield. 




136 


H. J. Diem, 


1241 


Mahaffey, R.D, 1, 


Clearfield. 




137 


Mrs. K. M. Diem, 


1241 


Mahaffey, R.D.,1 


Clearfield. 




138 


C. W. Yost, 


46 


Stillwater, ' 


Columbia. 




139 


J. A. Farabaugh, 


1126 


Bradley Junction, 


Cambria. 




140 


Mrs. G. A. Post, 


1198 


East Benton, 


Lackawana. 




141 


G. A. Post 


1198 


East Benton, 


TiRckawana. 




142 


F. S. Holmes, 


1212 


Corryville, 


McKean. 




143 


E. C. Holmes, 


1212 


Corryville, 


McKean. 




144 


Mrs. M. B. Howden, 


1212 


Corryville, 


McKean. 




145 


Mrs. C. W. Yost, 


46 


Stillwater, 


Columbia. 




146 


August Weber, 


1218 


Troutville, 


Clearfield. 




147 


Geo, W. Woodward, 


1240 


Pennfield, 


Clearfield. . 




148 


Mrs. C. E. Woodward, 


1240 


Pennfleld, 


Clearfield. 




149 


J. L. Voris, 


914 


Potts Grove, 


Northumberla;nd. 




150 


R. L. Campbell 


570 


West Sunbury, 


Butler. 


i 


151 


A. W. Reeves, 


1205 


Corydon, 


Warren. 


152 


'Mrs. Effle Reeves, 


1205 


Corrydon, 


Warren. 


\ 


153 


J. H. Dunkleberger, 


1242 


Hegins, 


Schuylkill. 




154 


J. I. Allshouse, 


770- 


Brookville, 


Jefferson. 


1 


155 


Daniel Eberley, 


810 


Hanover, 


York. 




156 


H. W. Pollock, 


• 131 


Mill Village, 


Erie. 




157 


Mrs. H. W. Pollock, 


131 


Mill Village, 


Erie. 


■'! 



At a special meeting of the State Grange held at West Chester, Pa., on 
August 24, 1905, in the Sixth Degree, the following members were initiated : 



POST OFFICE 

1 Joseph H. Willitts, 

2 Horace A. Pyle, 

3 James T. Sharpless, 

4 Jennie M. Rogers, 

5 Wilmer C. Mitchell, 

6 Ola M. Griffith, 

7 Howard S. Abel, 

8 Elmer W. Forrest, 

9 Sarah E. Forrest, 

10 Ida G. Thomas, 

11 Harvey M. Thomas, 

12 Lillian W. Thomas, 

13 Elizabeth C. Pearson, 

14 John F. Pearson, 

15 George E. Regester, 

16 E. H. West, 

17 Jane M. West, 

18 Mary H, Regester, 

19 Lindia A. Worrell, 

20 Maris A. Worrell, 

21 James S. Rogers, 

22 Thomas Sharpless 



COUNTY. 


NAME 


1141 


Ward, 


1141 


Ward, 


60 


West Chester, 


1173 


Media, 


121 


Sugartown, 


1220 


East Downingtown, 


1179 


Downingtown, 


1179 


Glen Moore, R.D. 1, 


1179 


Glen Moore, R.D, 1, 


121 


White Horse, 


121 


White Hor^e, 


121 


White Horse, 


1173 


Newton Square, 


1173 


Newton Square, 


1173 


Media, 


1173 


Upland, 


1173 


Upland, 


1173 


Media, 


1173 


Media, 


1173 


Media, 


1173 


Media, 


60 


West Chester, 



No. 

Delaware. 

Chester. 

Chester. 
Delaware. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 
Chester 
Chester 

Chester. 
• Chester. 

Chester. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 



53 



<^. 





THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OF THE 






NAME 


No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY. 


23 


Jennie E. Brown, 


66 


Peters Creek, 


Lancaster. 


24 


Martha Smedley, 


66 


Fulton House, 


Lancaster. 


25 


W. F. Beck, M. D., 


889 


Altoona, 


Blair. 


26 


A. G. C. Smith, 


1173 


Media, 


Delaware. 


27 


Charles K. Hicks, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


28 


Edgar T. Hicks, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


29 


B. Frank Green, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


30 


Ida Green, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


31 


L. Bertha Pratt, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


32 


Arthur H. Pratt, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


33 


Elizabeth Taylor, 


121 


Malvern, 


Chester. 


34 


Harry F. Taylor, 


121 


Malvern, 


Chester. 


35 


Bessie R. Hughes, 
Mary E. Marsh, 


91 


Elkview, 


Chester. 


36 


91 


Elkview, 


Chester. 


37 


Lilian A. Pusey, 


91 


Chatham, 


Chester. 


38 


Edward R. Morrison, 


91 


Cochranville, 


Chester. 


39 


Bertha A. Morrison, 


91 


Cochranville, 


Chester. 


40 


Samuel P. Martin, 


91 


Cochranville, 


Chester. 


41 


Annie C. Martin, 


91 


Cochranville, 


Chester. 


42 


Homer Jeffries- 


63 


Landenburg, 


Chester. 


-%i 


J. Whittier Fulton 


63 


Doe Run, 


Chester. 


44 


Isabel P. Fulton, • 


63 


Doe Run, 


Chester. 


45 


Laura L. Hrcks, 


63 


Avondale, 


Chester. 


46 


Benj. L. Wood, 


63 


Avondale, 


Chester. 


47 


Mary M. "Wood, 


63 


Avondale 


Chester. 


48 


Caleb E. Chambers, 


63 


Chatham, 


Chester. 


49 


Sue P. Chambers, 


63 


Chatham, 


Chester. 


50 


Herbert Getty, 


1279 


Manoa, 


Chester. 


51 


Emma Getty, 


1279 


Manoa, 


Chester. 


52 


Alta Byers, 


1279 


Edgmont, 


Chester. 


53 


Bessie Byers, 


1279 


Edgmont 


Chester. 


54 


William Mendenhall, 


1279 


Edgmont, 


Chester. 


55 


Owen B. Powell, 


1279 


Newton Square, 


Chester. 


56 


Elizabeth Mendenhall, 


1279 


Edgmont, 


Chester. 


57 


Mary J. Clark, 


1263 


Unionville, 


Chester. 


58 


Charles Love, 


1263 


Unionville, 


Chester. 


59 


Lilian T. Michener, 


1263 


Northbrook, 


Chester. 


60 


Ponnall Webb, 


1263 


Unionville, 


Chester. 


61 


Kate P. Webb, 


1263 


Unionville, \ 


Chester. 


62 


Hannah Marshall, 


1263 


Norway, "^n 
Unionville, ^ 


Chester. 


63 


Carroll Clark, 


1263 


Chester. 


64 


Willard Cloud, 


19 


Norway, 


Chester. 


65 


Frank Lamborn, 


19 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


66 


Jane T. C. McCord, 


1231 


Chadds Ford, 


Delaware. 


67 


Alice McCord, 


1231 


Ohadds Ford, 


Delaware. 


68 


Ida H. Davis, 


1231 


Chadds Ford, 


Delaware. 


69 


Maggie J. Baldwin, 


1231 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


70 


Ella M. Heald, 


1231 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


71 


R. E. Ramsey, 


1220 


Embreebille, 


Chester. 


72 


Mrs. R. E. Ramsey, 


1220 


Erhbreeville, 


Chester. 


73 


H. V. Ramsey, 


1220 


Embreeville, 


Chester. 


74 


N. Marion Irvin, 


1220 


East Downingtown, 


Chester. 


75 


George B. Fisher, 


1220 


East Downingtown, 


Chester. 


76 


Mrs. G. B. Fisher, 


1220 


East Downingtown, 


Chester. 


77 


Joseph Bicking, 


1220 


East Downingtown 


Chester. 


79 


John Baldwin, 


1220 


East Downingtown 


Chester. 


80 


Anna Baldwin, 


1220 


East Downingtown 


Chester. 


81 


Florence Guie 


1220 


Downingtown, 


Chester. 


82 


William Krauser, 


1220 


Font, 


Chester. 


83 


Bessie Krauser, 


1220 


Font, 


Chester. 


84 


Lewis Clayton, 


1220 


Font, 


Chester. 


85 


Maude J. Allen, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


86 


Harry L. Hicks, 


121 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


87 


Elizabeth H. Hicks, 


121 


West Chester, " 


Chester. 


88 


Lemuel Bennett, 


60 


West Chester, 


" Chester. 


89 


Emmarene C. Bullock, 


60 


Corrine, 


Chester. 


90 


T. Edgar Walter, 


60 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


91 


Fraricis Sterraid, 


60 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


92 


Benjamin Davis, 


60 


West CTiester, 


Chester. 


93 


(Samuel E. Howell, 


60 


West Chester, 


Chester. 



54 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



NAME No. 

94 Ralph E. Baker. 1269 

95 Clara L. Baker, 1269 

96 Walter Wood, 1269 

97 Mary Wood, 1269 

98 Morris Wood, 1269 

99 Margaret Wood. 1269 

100 Walter Barnard, 1269 

101 Florence Barnard, 1269 

102 Howard Pusey, 1269 

103 Clarence Hope, 980 

104 Mrs. Clarence Hope, 980 

105 Morris Phillips, 980 

106 Mrs. Morris Phillips, 980 

107 Jos. W. H. Green. 1173 

108 Chas. K. Payson, 1085 

109 Mrs. Chas. K. Payson, 1085 

110 Wm. D. Marshall, 1179 

111 Edna J. Marshall, 1179 

112 M. Adda Page, 1179 

113 A. Leon North, 1179 

114 Elizabeth North, 1179 

115 W. Morgan McFarland, 1263 

116 Elizabeth McFarland. 1263 

117 Mary R. Chambers, 1263 

118 J. Gilbert Scott, 60 

119 Mary Hoffman, 1220 

120 Mary Davis, 1179 

121 Samuel H. Pusey, 63 

122 William H. Baker, 1173 

123 A. M. Baker, 1173 

124 Mary B. Hoffman, 1220 

125 Mary W. Pusey, 63 

126 Lilian M. Barton, 60 

127 Anna A. Thomas, 1279 

128 Ho Ward A. Morrow, 1279 

129 Jared Darlington, 1141 

130 Samuel Byers, 1279 

131 Marian E. Darlington, 1141 

132 Margaret R. Pyle, 1141 

133 Earl Conrad, 1173 

134 Bertha M. Sager, 1173 

135 Arthur E. Mitchell, 121 

136 Sarah A. Barton, 60 

137 Carrie L. Conrad, 1220 

138 Robert C. Bone, 1220 

139 J. C. Valentine, 1220 

140 Lela Nora Sahler, 60 

141 Margaret Sharpless, 60 

142 Anna Sharpless, 60 

143 Jean Bane Foulke, 60 

144 Herbert J. Plank, 121 

145 Anna Pinkerton, 1173 

146 David Caldwell, 1173 

147 A. Lincoln Worrell, 1173 

148 H. H. Cloud, 1173 

149 Ella Cloud, 1173 

150 Isaac Worrell, 1173 

151 R. P. Dutton, 12 79 

152 Mary S. Chandler, 63 

153 Marian Pusey, 63 

154 Elizabeth B. Pusey, 63 

155 Jane Brinton, 121 

156 E. D. Hall, 121 

157 Lydia A. Hall, 121 

158 Mabel E. Green, 121 

159 Cora L. Hall, 121 

160 Lillian Cloud, 19 

161 M. Elizabeth Pyle, 19 

162 Bertha M. Forsythe, 63 

163 Herbert Mendenhall. 1279 



POST OFFICE 

Pomeroy, 

Pomeroy, 

Doe Run, 

Doe Run, 

Doe Run, 

Doe Run, 

Chatham, 

Chatham, 

Chatham, 

Parksburg, 

Parksburg,. 

Pomeroy, 

Pomeroy, 

Edgmont, 

Parksburg, 

Parksburg, 

Lyndell, 

Lyndell, 

Lyndell, 

Lyndell, 

Lyndell, 

Leonard, 

Unionville, 

West Chester, 

West Chester, 

East Downingtown 

Avondale, 

Gradyville; 

Gradyville, 

West Whiteland, 

Avondale, 

Corrine, 

Newton Square, 

Malvern 

Darling, 

Newton Square, 

Darling, 

Brandywine Summit, 

Elwyn, 

Media, 

Sugartown, 

Corrine. 

Font, 

Thorndale, 

Cain, 

West Chester, 

West Chester, 

West Chester, 

West Chester, 

West Chester, 

Tanguy, 

Tanguy, 

Media, 

Media, 

Media, 

Media, 

Newton Square, 

Toughkennamon, 

Avondale, 

AvonidalQ, 

Pocopson, 

Malvern, 

Malvern, 

West Chester. 

Malvern, 

Kennett Square, 

Kennett Square, 

Avondale, 

Berwin. R.F.D. 

Berwin, R.F.D. 



COUNTY. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester.^ 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

ChesHer. 
Delaware. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 

Chester. 
Chester 

Chester. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 
Delaware. 

Cheste.r 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 

Chester. 






55 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 





NAME 


No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY. 


164 


Lizzie Mendenhall, 


1279 


East Downingtown 


Chester. 


165 


William Martin, 


1220 


White Horse, 


Chester. 


166 


Virda L. Davis, 


121 


Corinne, 


Chester. 


167 


Clarence F. Barton, 


60 


Ward, 


Delaware. 


168 


Charles E. Harvey, 


1141 


West Chester, R.D. 5, 


Chester. 


169 


Aneta R. Faucett, 


1141 


Chehney, 


Delaware. 


170 


Chester W. Ambler, 


1141 


Chenney, 


Delaware. 


171 


Georgeanne Cheyney, 


1141 


Chenney, 


Delaware. 


172 


Edith Cheyney, 


1141 


Markham, 


Delaware. 


173 


Mary Y. Hill, 


1141 


Boothwyn, 


Delaware. 


174 


Sarah P. Perry, 


1141 


Boothwyn, 


Delaware. 


175 


Rudolph Perry, 


1141 


Markham, 


Delaware. 


176 


William W. Hill, 


1141 


Cheyney, 


Delaware. 


177 


George S. Cheyney, 


1141 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


178 


Mary S. Sahler, 


60 


Lenape, 


Chester. 


179 


Alta J. Barnard, 


19 


Lenape, 


Chester. 


180 


Charles D. Barnard, 


60 


Lenape, 


Chester. 


181 


Mary P. Lawton, 


1173 


Lenape, 


Chester. 


182 


John E. Lawton, 


1173 


Ward 


Delaware. 


183 


Paul L. Willitts, 


1141 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


184 


Phebe J. Baldwin 


19 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


185 


Frank Massey, M. D,, 


60 


West Chester. 


Chester. 


186 


Margaret F. Massey, 


60 


East Downingtown, 


Chester. 


187 


Mary Kerr. 


60 


West Chester, 


Chester. 


188 


Emlen C. Faucett,; 


1141 


Cheyney, 


Delaware. 


189 


Helen Cheyney, 


1141 


Lyndell, 


Chester. 


190 


Wm. W. Martin, 


1179 


Lyndell, 


Chester. 


191 


Mary A. Martin, 


1179 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


192 


Benjamin J. Aulde, 


19 


Unionville, 


Chester. 


193 


Townsend H. McFadden, 


1263 


Ercildown, 


Chester. 


194 


George W. Moorse, 


1179 


Unionville, 


Chester. 


195 


W. R. Perdue, M. D,, 


1263 


Chads Ford, 


. Delaware. 


196 


Alice M. Garrett, 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


197 


Robert M. Fell, 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


198 


Bessie M. Fell, 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


199 


Nellie A. Gallagher, 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


200 


Cornelia H, Brillinger, 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


201 


Sellers, Hoffman, Jr., 


1231 


Chads Ford, 


Delaware. 


202 


Florence Baldwin, 


1231 


liyndell, 


Chester. 


203 


Frank Shinneman, 


1179 


LyncUlI, 


Chester. 


205 


Jennie Chase, 


1179 


Downingtown, 


Chester. 


206 


Mary B. Richmond, 


1179 


Downingtown, 


Chester. 


207 


Margaret J. Moore, 


1179 


Downingtown, 


Chester. 


208 


Joseph Trego, 


1179 


Glen Moore, 


Chester. 


209 


Mary Fra-ser, 


1179 


Glen Moore, 


Chester. 


210 


Martha Eraser. 


1179 


Glen Moore, 


Chester. 


211 


George Fraser, 


1179 


Glen Moore, 


Chester. 


212 


Eliza J. Lambourne, 


19 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


213 


J. Walter Parker, 


19 


Kennett Square, 


. Chester. 


214 


Mary S. Parker, 


19 


Kennett Square, 


Chester. 


215 


Abijail J. Hannum, 


60 


West Chester. 


Chester. 


216 


Philip C. Pusey, 


63 


London Grove, 


Chester. 


217 


Hannah H. Pusey, 


63 


London Grove, 


Chester. 



At a special meeting of the State Grange held at Tunkhannock, Pa., on 
Sept 6, 1905, the following received the Sixth Degree : 

NAME 

1 E. A. Wagner, 

2 Mrs. Josephine Wagner, 

3 Mrs. D. T. Carpenter, 

4 Mrs. Emma Wagner, 

5 Mrs. T. K. Vose, 

6 Anderson Dana, 

7 A, A. Clayton, 

8 A. H. Brown, 

9 I. C. Tague, 
10 A. C. Keeney, 



No. 


POST OFFICE 




COUNTY. 


209 


Osterhout, 




Wyoming. 


209 


Tunkhannock, 




Wyoming. 


209 


OsterTiout, 




Wyohaing. 


209 


Osterliout, 




Wyoming. 


209 


South Eaton, 




Wyoming. 


209 


Tunkhannock, 




Wyoming, 


508 


Tunkhannock, 


R.D. 1. 


Wyoming. 


321 


Factoryville, No. 1, 


Wyoming. 


321 


Tunkhannock, 


No. 1, 


Wyoming. 


1249 


Lacyville. 

5G 




Wyoming. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



NAME No. 

11 Mrs. John Adams, 400 

12 G. B. Patterson, 400 

13 Marilla Love, 209 

14 Mrs. Frances Boll, 209 

15 Jabez S. Miller, 209 

16 Frances A. Miller, 209 

17 Mrs. W. H. Rhodes, . 400 

18 Mrs. George Gregory, 209 

19 Mrs. M. B. Jackson, 209 

20 Mrs. George Welch. 209 

21 Mrs. N. G. Bunnell, 508 

2 2 Mary Layman, 508 

23 Porter Michael, 508 

24 N. G. Bunnell, 508 

25 ^V. D. Sampson, 209 

26 Mrs. W. D. Sampson, 209 

27 Jennie L. Gardner, 1245 

28 F. H. Pallman, 400 

29 Mrs. C. W. Little, 209 

30 F. H. Fassett, 926 

31 Fred L. Herman, 209 

3 2 Mrs. W. E. Little, 209 

33 Mrs. Marion Herman, 209 

34 Mrs. B. W. Brown, 321 

35 Riley Wilsey, 209 

36 L. H. Stark 508 

37 Joseph Shupp, 400 

38 Ira H. Mead, 508 

39 Mrs, Charles Freeman, 400 

40 -Mrs. G. B. Patterson, 400 

41 Mrs. E. O. Billings, 209 

42 Mrs. A. R. Smith, 1139 

43 Mrs. C. N. Snyder, 1261 

44 C. N. Snyder, 1261 

45 Mrs. G. P. Jennings, 1139 

46 G. P. Jennings, 1129 

47 Mrs. Fred Rought, 1245 

48 Fred Rought. 1245 

4 9 Horace Seamans, 1245 

50 Mrs. Horace Seamans, 1245 

51 S. C. Jayre, 1249 

52 C. A. Sisk, 1245 

53 Fred B. Keeney, 1249 

54 Clarence Stroud. 1249 

55 Mrs. John Bolson, 209 

56 John Bolson, 209 

57 Mrs. A. C. Keeney, 1249 

58 E. O. Billings, 209 

59 Mrs. Charles Carrj 209 

60 Mrs. Lydia Tiff arty, 1139 

61 C. D. Travis, 321 

62 Mrs. A. E. Thomas, 400 

63 Mrs. Anna Ney, 209 

64 Mrs. M. S. Cline, 1249 

65 Mrs. M. C. Keeney, 1249 

66 M. C. Keeney, 1249 
•67 Mrs. J. W. Wrigley, 400 

68 A. D. Gardner, 1245 

69 Mrs. A. D. Gardner, 1245 

70 Lester S. Prevost, 506 

71 Mrs. Lester Prevost, 506 

72 M. B. Jackson, 209 

73 Mrs. John B. Miller, 1245 

74 G. Elmer Detrick, 508 

75 John B. Miller, 1245 

76 Mrs. Joseph Frey, 400 

77 Mrs. Nelson L. Ball, 400 

78 John Omara. 1250 

79 Mrs. P. N. Boyle, 1261 
«0 Mrs, H. B. Wilkins, 1261 
81 P. N, Boyle, 1261 



POST OFFICE 

Tunkhannock, 

Tunkhannock, 

Tunkhannock, No. 2, 

Tunkhannock. No, 2, 

Osterhout, 

Osterhout, 

Tunkhannock, 

Osterhout, 

Osterhout, 

Osterhout, 

Vosburg, 

Meshoppen, No. 4, 

Truckville, 

Vosburg, 

Tunkhannock. No. 1, 

Tunkhannock, No. 1, 

Factoryville, 

Factoryville, 

Tunkhannock, 

Meshoppen. 

Eatonville, 

Tunkhannock. 

Eatonville, 

Tunkhannock. R.D. 2, 

White Ferry, 

Tunkhannock. R.D. 2, 

Tunkhannock. R.D. 2, 

Tunkhannock. R.D. 2, 

Tunkhannodlc. R.D. 2, 

Tunkhannock, R.D. 2. 

Tunkhannock. R.D, 2, 

Mehoopany, 

Nicholson, 

Nicholson, 

Mehoopany, 

Mehoopany. 

Factoryville, 

Factoryville, 

Factoryville, 

Factoryville, 

Laceyville, 

Factoryville, 

Laceyville, 

Skinner's Eddy, 

Tunkhannock. 

Tunkhannock. 

Lacyville, 

Tunkhannock, 

Tunkhannock, 

Skinner's Eddy, 

Factoryville, R, D. 

Starkville, 

Rosengrant, 

Laceyville. 

Laceyville, 

Laceyville, 

Lake Carey, 

Factoryville, 

Factoryville, 

Russell Hill, 

Russell Hill, 

Osterhout, 

Factoryville, 

Russell Hill, 

Factoryville, 

Tunkhannock, 

East Lemon, 

Stowell, 

Nicholson, 

Nicholson, 

Nicholson, 



COUNTY. 

Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Luzerne. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
"VV'yoming. 
Wyoming, 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming, 
Wyoming, 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming, 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming- 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
WSn&ming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 
Wyoming. 



57 



< 


THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OB' THE 






NAME 


No. 


POST OPPIGE 


COUNTY. 


82 


A. G. Overfield, 


926 


Skinner's Eddy, 


Wyoming. 


83 


Mrs. Ida May Pollman, 


400 


Pactoryville. 


Wyoming. 


84 


N. G. Cobb 


1245 


Factoryville. 


Wyoming. 


85 


Frank Gardner, 


1245 


Factoryville. 


Wyoming. 


86 


Prank Wheelock, 


1245 


Pactoryville. 


Wyoming. 


87 


Mrs. Frank Wheelock, 
1 


1245 


Pactoryville. 


Wyoming. 



Sixt 



At WellsbOTO, Pa., on Sept. 7, 1905, the following were instructed in the 





NAME 


No. 


POST OFFICE 




COUNTY. 


1 


I. G. Stone, 


384 


Wellsboro 6 




Tioga. 


2 


Mrs. Libbie Beach, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


3 


W. A. Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


4 


Mrs. W. A. Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


5 


F. S. Andrews, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


6 


Mrs. S. P. Andrews, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


7 


Maud N. Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 2 




Tioga. 


8 


Mary J. Callahan, 


841 


Parmington Hill, 2,, 


Tioga. 


9 


Thomas Dalkin, 


1009 


Antrim Box 113 




Tioga. 


10 


E. E. Carpenter, 


705 


Little March, 




*^' Tioga. 


11 


Emma Carpenter.^ 


705 


Little March, 




Tioga. 


12 


Eva J. Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


13 


J. E. Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4. 


Tioga. 


14 


Armenia Spencer, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D, 


4, 


Tioga. 


15 


Hannah R. Mulford. 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4. 


Tioga. 


16 


Mary Emily Whiting, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


17 


D. C. Manley, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


18 


Mrs. E. O'Conner, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


19 


D. W. Heise, 


1009 


^Vellsboro, R.D. 


4. 


Tioga. 


20 


Delia Shumway, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


21 


Mildred Suhr, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4. 


Tioga. 


22 


Edna Bellinger, 


1009 


M^ellsboro, R.D. 


4, 


Tioga. 


23 


Mary Sherdweiler, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


4. 


Tioga. 


24 


Mrs. Rosella Austin, 


1017 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


11 


Tioga. 


25 


C N. Austin, 


1017 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


11 


Tioga. 


26 


Mrs. George Daugherty, 


1078 


Westfield.R. 1, 




Tioga. 


27 


Mrs. C. M. Bellinger, 


3009 


Wellsboro, 




Tioga. 


28 


W. W. Davis, 


817 


Knoxville, 




Tioga. 


29 


Xulia L. Wilcox, 


989 


Sabinsville, 




Tioga. 


30 


D. W. Shumway, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 




Tioga. 


31 


Lyman D. Goodspeed, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 




Tioga. 


32 


Joseph Owlett, 


1009 


Wellsboro, 




Tioga. 


33 


P. J. Ashley, 


1009 


Wellsboro, R.D. 


8 


Tioga. 


34 


R. S. Walbridge, 


1033 


Tiadahgton, R. 


1, 


Tioga. 


35 


M. C. Comstock, 


1095 


Lorenton, 




Tioga. 


36 


Mrs. Delia Kalts, 


937 


Lawrenceville. 




Tioga. 


37 


B. H. Warriner, 


1033 


Tiadahton, 




Tioga. 


38 


Clifford Redner, 


1223 


Tioga, 




Tioga. 


39 


Lelia Coveney, 


913 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


40 


George W. Coveney, 


913 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


41 


L. S. Collins, 


929 


Wellsboro, R. 10, 


Tioga. 


42 


John Henrich, 


1149 


Galeton, 




Tioga. 


43 


Nettie Colegrove, 


1149 


Gaines, R. 1, 




Tioga. 


44 


W. H. Gurnsey, 


1088 


Westfield, 




Tioga. 


45 


J. L. Colegrove, 


1149 


Gaines, R. 1, 




Tioga. 


46 


J. S, Franke, 


1216 


Coudersport. R. 


1, 


Tioga. 


47 


E. C. Franke, 


1216 


Coudersport. R. 


1, 


Tioga. 


48 


Catharine Van Sice, 


1017 


Wellsboro, Box 


645, • 


, Tioga. 


49 


J. J. Van Sice, 


1017 


Wellsboro, Box 


645, 


, Tioga. 


50 


Willard Redner, 


1223 


Tioga, 




Tioga. 


51 


Mrs. Ida Price, 


937 


Lawrenceville, 




Tioga. 


52 


Mrs. Mary Doan, 


966 


Crooked Creek, 




Tioga. 


53 


Stephen Scranton, 


902 


Marsh Creek, 




Tioga. 


54 


D. M. Birkett, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


55 


A. B, Wheeler, 


384 


Wellsboro, 




Tioga. 


56 


Clara B. Steele, 


1223 


Tioga, R. 2, 




Tioga. 


57 


Doles Winne, 


54 


Wellsboro. R. 5, 




Tioga. 


58 


E, E, Leonard, 


814 


Nelson, 




Tioga. 



58 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 





NAME 


No. 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY, 


59 


H. J. Hart, 


54 


Wellsboro, 


R. 5, 


Tioga. 


60 


Emmitt D. 'Stover, 


913 


Mansfield, 


R. 3. 


Tioga. 


61 


Mrs. E. D, Stover. 


913 


Mansfield, 


R. 3. 


Tioga. 


62 


L. L. Comstock, 


1095 


Lorento, 




Tioga. 


63 


(Stanley Hagar, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


64 


Ora M. Hagar, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


65 


C. L. Hagar, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


66 


Jennie Hagar, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


67 


Clark D. Kingsley, 


918 


Mansfield, 




Tioga. 


68 


Jud D. Seely. 


957 


Osceola, 




Tioga. 



Grange closed in the Sixth Degree and opened in the lower degrees in 
their order. The courts of each degree were shown and the symbolism and 
unwritten work explained by the Worthy Master. 

Grange closed. 

An illustrated lecture on "Chest nut Culture" followed. This was 
given by Prof. Davis, of Lewisburg. 



THURSDAY MORNING. 

Grange opened in full form by "Worthy Master, Hill. 

The Committee on Good of the Order submitted their report : 

Report of Committee on Good of the Order. 

Worthy Master : Your Committee on Good of the Order report as 

follows : ^ 

No. 1 is recommended by the committee as we believe it would add dig- 
nity to our meetings. 

Seven resolutions were submitted to us for consideration. 

Resolution No. 1 : 

Whereas, We believe that more ceremony than is now being observed in 
our order would add dignity to our body, increase the interest of the mem- 
bers and be generally beneflcient; Therefore, be It 

Resolved, That we hereby pray our representatives to the National 

Grange to use their best efforts to secure such legislation by that body ais 

will make it obligatory for every one in crossing the body of the open Grange, 

or upon arising to address the Worthy Master, to throw the sign to him, of 

the degree in which the Grange is working. 

GEORGE R. NORTH, 
Lyndell Grange, No. 1179. 
Resolution No. 2. 

Whereas, The increased membership of the Grange throughout the State 
has greatly increased the revenues and strengthened the treasury, Therefore, 

p.esolved, by London Grove Grange, No. 63, of Chester County, That we 
favor a reduction of quarterly State dues from 7 to 6 cents; thereby reducing 
t^Tie burdens oif subordinate Granges. 

T. L. PASSMORE, Master 

ELIZABETH PUiSEY, Sec. 

By the Committee — ^We are highly pleased to' acknowledge the increasing 
strength of the Grange and its treasury and believe that with continued growth 
it will be wise in the near future to make the proposed reduction in State 
dues, but are not ready to recommend such a change at this time. 

Resolution No. 3 : 

Linden Hall, Pa., Dec. 11, 1905 

To the Pennsylvania State Grange in annual session at Sunbury : 

We respectfully petition your honorable body to authorize the formation 
of a Federation of Pomona Granges of the State for the purpose of enabling 
them to unite their forces and influences in a Legislative Council through 



59 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OP THE 



which the ablest talent of the order could be utilized, which under existing 
conditions lies dormant;» because many of the ablest men and women of the 
order do not want to hold office in the Grange, but would be wilting to serve 
without compensation to assist in securing legislation to better the condition 
of the farmers. 

The foregoing legislation would bring the Pomona Granges into the im- 
portant position they were intended and ought to occupy in the order, which 
would in no way interfere with the representation of local Granges in the 
State Grange. 

We therefore pray your honorable body to give Pomona Granges the rec- 
ognition that their -position as Fifth Degree Granges entitles them. 

If the foregoing recommendations are concurred in, we would respect- 
fully ask that the Master and Secretary with the Executive Committee be 
empowered to call such a conference and adopt rules for its government. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE DALE, Master 

D. M. GAMPBELL, Secretary, 
Center County Pomona Grange 

By the Committee — ^Not recommended, because such action seems unnec- 
essary and somewhat conflicting with the efficient work of the present Legisla- 
tive Committee of Pomona Granges. 

Resolution No. 4 : 

Office of Clarion County Pomona Grange No. 27, P. of H., Secretary, 
Edward M. McEntire. 

Frampton, Pa., December 8th, 1905. 

The following was unanimously adopted by Clarion County Pomona 
Grange, No. 27, P. of -H., at the regular quarterly session held December 7 
and 8 : Preamble ; 

Whereas, For the benefit of Subordinate Granges, we think that the of- 
ficers should be elected before the meeting of State Grange in December, 849 
it would have this effect : The new Master, who would attend the sessions of 
State Grange, would return home enthused with the work for the coming 
year. Therefore, be it .... 

Resolved, That this Pomona Grange, No. 27, respectfully recommend that 
Penn'a. State Grange work through the proper channel of the National 
Grange to have the election clause in the Constitution changed to have the 
election of officers to be held at the last meeting in Septemljer and installed 
at first meeting in October. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Not recommended by the committee, because we believe that inexper- 
ienced delegates would be detrimental to good work of the State Grange. 

Resolution No. 5. 

Whereas, There is no representation in the Pennsylvania State Grange 
from our Pomona Granges, Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That Brandy wine Grange, No. 60, recommends and especially 
urges that each Pomona Grange in the State shall be represented in the State 
Grange by one delegate, who shall have a voice on. the floor and vote in that 
body. 

Resolved, That such delegate shall be the Master of Pomona Grange, or 
in the even| of his inability to attend State Grange, that he be empowered to 
appoint a member to represent him therein. 

Resolved, That Pomona Grange bear the transportation expenses. 

J. ROBERTS, Chairman. ^ 

Recommended by the committee for adoption, because we believe that 
the high character of the representatives of Pomonas would add strength to 
the State Grange, and because the limited number of delegates would not 
greatly increase the size 6f the State Grange. 

Resolution No. 6 covers the same ground as No. 5. 

Resolution No. 7 : • 



60 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Inasmuch, As tlie different families embracing the fifty thousand and more 
Patrons of Pennsylvania feel the need of being kept advised upon Grange pro- 
motion in this State, and, 

Whereas, It appears to be advisable that the privilege of carrying edver- 
tising should be extended to our official organ, "Pennsylvania Grange News;" 
Therefore, be it. 

Resolved, That we, the representatives of the five hundred and forty Sub- 
ordinate Granges in Penr)isylvania hereby authorize the Executive Committee 
of the State Grange to secure a change in the post office franchlae of this 
publication so that it be enabled to carry legitimate advertising. 

Edinboro Grange, No. 947, beg leave to submit the above resolution. 
Favorably reported by the committee. 

The recommendations of the committee were sustained by the State 
Grange on all of the resolutions, except No. 5. 

Mr. Simon Lubin, of the firm of Lubin & Co., New York, was introduced, 
and addressed the Grange on the business arrangements between the State 
Grange and their house. 

Grange took a recess until 2 p. m. 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON, 

state Grange was called to order by the Worthy Master. 

The following resolution was offered by Bro. E. R. Mulford, of Tioga 
County, representing the Press Association of Pennsylvania : 

Resolved, That we, the members of the Pennsylvania State Grange In see- 
sion at Sunbury, Pa., Dec. 14, 1905, instruct our Worthy Master to appoint 
a member of our order, who is a practical newspaper worker, to act as State 
Editor of news to be furnished to papers outside our organization. 

Resolved, That we request each Pomona Grange to elect one of its mem- 
bers to act as Pomona correspondent. 

Resolved, That we request each Subordinate Grange to appoint a member 
as Subordinate Grange correspondent. 

Thes6 resolutions were adopted. 

The old State Grange court robes were sold to the highest bidder by Bro.. 
E. B. Dorsett for $7.25. 

The following resolutions were presented for immediate action by Bros. 
J. H. Johnson and F. H. Faussett. 

Whereas, Br.o. H. A. Surface, Economic Zoologist ,has rendered Invalu- 
able service to the fruit growers of the State and to the members of our order 
through his personal efforts and his monthly bulletins. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we, as a State Grange, heartily endorse Bro. Surface and 
his work. 

Resolved, That our Legislative Committee use all honorable means to se- 
cure appropriations which will assure proper financial support for the continu- 
ation of this work and the enlargement of its scope. 

The resolutions were adopted. 

The hour for the election of one member of the Executive Committee 
and one member of the Finance Committee to serve for the ensuing three 
years having arrived, tellers were appointed as follows : 

On Executive Committee, Mary Williams, of Luzerne, and Sellers Hoff- 
man, Chester. 

On Finance Committee, M. B. Herman, Franklin, and Fred. Weingard, 
Forest. 

61 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



At the close of the ballot the tellers reported the election of I. Frank 
Chandler, of Chester County,_-on the Executive Committee, and S. B. Brown, 
of Bedford County, on the Finance Committee, 

Recess until 7:30, p. m. 



"THURSDAY EVENING. 

Grange called to order by the Worthy Master. 

Bro. H. C. Demming, of Harrisburg, presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on the address of the Worthy Master : 

Majority Report. 

Worthy Overseer and Members of the Pennsylvania State Grange : 

The Committee appointed by you on the Worthy Master's annual address 
respectfully report that the recommendations contained therein were most 
carefully considered, and we unanimously submit : 

1. That the assigning of speakers and all other subjects pertaining to 
Grange picnics, harvest homes. Grange encampments, etc., including partial 
or whole State Grange control, be plaecd entirely in the hands of the Worthy 
State Master, the Worthy State Secretary and the State Executive Committee, 
with full power in the premises; and annual report thereon to be submitted 
to the State Grange. ^ 

2. That Pomona Granges be urged to select their very best member as 
Master, one of widest experience and influence with the agricultural class of 
the jurisdiction. 

We recommend that the subjects of Grange insurance, the building, of 
county bridges, improved roads, agricultural high .schools, township high 
schools, supervision of the county deputies, encouraging and building up of 
weak Granges, and the buying and selling of commodities, be delegated to 
the Pomona Granges, insofar as such matters do not conflict with any action 
by the State Grange or the National Grange. 

2,' . The subject of a broader and higher education for farmers' children 
can not be too strongly advocated until all such have all the educational priv- 
ileges of the children of the town or city. 

3. We endorse the action of the National Grange in favoring the manu- 
facturing of denaturalized alcohol and recommend that the internal revenue 
be removed from such portion of the total output of alcohol as may be 
spoiled for beverage purposes by the introduction of some acid or poison as 
will render it unfit for drinking. 

4. As voicing the sentiments of our Worthy Master on the regulation of 
freight rates, we recommend that the following message be sent by our 
Worthy Secretary to the Chief Executive of the Nation : 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, 

President of the United States, 

Washington, D. C. : 

The Granges of Pennsylvania, in annual session, are unanimously with 
you on the railroad rate question, and on every other subject, the basis of 
which is a square deal. 

5. We are decidedly favorable to the continuance of the International 
Institute of Agriculture. 

6. We join with the Worthy Master in the manifestation of our heart- 
felt appreciation of the great assistance rendered to our beloved order by the 
press of our State. We never seek their columns in vain. They are open, and 
most generously, on all subjects, favorable to our welfare. 

In this connection we enthusiastically endorse our Worthy Master's rec- 
ommendations relative to the "Pennsylvania Grange News," and we respect- 
fully ask your honorable body to take immediate action whereby the proper 
Department at Washington shall grant the additional franchise permitting 
the publication in its columns of the class of advertisements mentioned in 
the Worthy Master's address. 



62 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



7. Your committee recommends the approval of the action of your Ex- 
ecutive Committee during the past year relative to the business branch of 
the organization in their charge. They surely have a trying task at time-s, 
and we can not too highly commend our officials whose constant aim is to do 
right, as well as to advance the material side of our order. 

8. We recommend that our Legislative Committee, as well as all our 
members, continue to press for that equalization of taxation which shall In- 
sure to every farmer no more and no less than he is justly entitled to pay. 

9. We most emphatically agree with our Worthy Master that it is 
wrong in principle to have so large a State Treasury surplus, while public 
schools have to wait for their appropriation, and so -many public roads re- 
main out of repair. We agree with our Worthy Master that extreme care 
should be taken to prevent reckless expenditure of money by the State au- 
thorities on small stretches of roads, when so much has to be done to prop- 
erly improve our country highways generally. 

10. We also com,mend the work of the Legislative Committee with the 
hope that they will not weary in well doing. The silver lining to the cloud 
is broader and brighter than ever before in our history, and the day seems 
to be not far distant when the whole cloud will roll away. 

11. The protection of our dairy interests, and the enactment of more 
stringent pure food laws, are among the dearest concerns of the farmers of 
Pennsylvania. We unqualifiedly support our Worthy Master's declaration in 
regard thereto. 

12. The matter of giving to trolley roads the right to carry expressage 
and freight should be contended for more vigorously than ever. With the 
elimination next year of free passes by the railroad companies we will have 
added to our side of the question a host that from the beginning agreed with 
us mentally; but, from motives of so-called prudence and caution, have hith- 
erto withheld their active support. 

13. We recommend that this State Grange endorse by special vote that 
part of the' Worthy Master's annual message which calls for a greater inter- 
est in Forestry. 

14. As to farmers' national banks, the time has surely arrived for its 
serious consideration. A bank or two in our strongest counties would soon 
demonstrate whether farmers can be successful bankers, as well as those in 
other walks of life. The subject could well be taken up at once, and tests 

made whether we can handle our own money to better advantage than by con- 
tinually entrusting it into the hands of others, too often to our own hurt. 

15. We can join with our Worthy Master in commending the various 
divisions of the State Department of Agriculture, and acknowledging the 
splendid work done, especially in the farmers' institutes, the dairy and food 
and the economic zoology fields. They have been of very marked material 
benefit not only to the agriculturist, but to every honest citizen of the Com- 
monwealth. 

16. We press upon our membership the unusual facilities for securing 
the use of good literature through the Pennsylvania State Library circulating 
division. 

17. With the Worthy Master we urge upon the State College a wider 
door for education especially adapted to farmers' sonsland daughters. 

In conclusion, we report that the annual message of the Worthy Master 
submitted to us is one of the most comprehensive, straight-forward, timely 
and valuable documents that has been submitted to the Pennsylvania State 
Grange since its organization, and we recommend its careful reading by every 
member of the order. 



Sunbury, Pa., Dec. 14, A. D., 1905. 



Respectfully submitted. 



HENRY C. DEMMING, 
M. N, CLARK, 
JOSEPHINE ROBERTS. 
Mrs. V. B. HOLIDAY. 
CLARA G^LE. 
S. J. LOGAN. 
R. S. SEARLE. 



'6 3 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



Bro. R. S. Searle assents to all of the foregoing report, exc6pt that part 
endorsing Grange Banks. 

The report was vigorously discussed and after some slight amendments^ 
was adopted as above. 

The Committee on Transportation reported : 

Worthy Master, Sisters and Brothers : 

As your committee have no resolutions to consider, we would act upon 
the question of transportation generally. 

One of the foremost questions confronting the farmers .and all other 
real estate owners is the discrimination in freight rates. Discrimination in 
freight rates has robbed the Pennsylvania farmer of millions of dollars. We 
know of no financial evil so great and bearing so heavily upon the farmers, as 
giving of lower freight rates in the shape of rebates, to one individual or 
community than to another. The unfair system of classification is scarcely a 
less evil. 

The present state of affairs, in regard to transporting our products to the 
various markets brings us face to face with the fact, that there is to-day ab- 
solutely no check to the price these gigantic, well organized companies may 
charge for carriage of freight. 

We believe that this question is a national one. We therefore endorse the 
action of the National Grange which has already placed itslef on record in 
demanding an amendment to the law favoring the granting of increased pow- 
er to the Inter-State Commerce Commission. Your committee would there- 
fore most heartily recommend this just and equitable amendment. 

We would also recommend to the State Grange for its support, the po- 
sition of President Roosevelt in his effort to have larger power for the ad- 
justment of freight rates — conferred upon the Inter-State Commerce Com- 
mission. 

Also to this State Grange for its support, the position of United States 
Attorney General Moody, in his efforts to punish the shippers as well as the 
carriers, who have combined with the railroads to procure discrimination in 
their favor. 

Your committee further recommends that this State Grange renew its de- 
mands upon our State Legislature to enact a law granting trolley roads the 
right to carry freight. 

It is apparent to every thinking person that the solution of the transpor- 
tation problem is the keynote to the remuneraion of the producer, potential 
in rearing happy homes, potential in creating better manhood and woman- 
hood and potential in the perpetuation of our State and National Institutions. 

Fraternally submitted, 

F. LEONARD REBER, Chairman, 
CHARLES A. SISK, 
R. W. BOAL, 

Committee 

Report adopted as read. 

The following report of the Committee on Constitution and By-Laws was 
adopted as read : 

Report of Committee om Constitution and By-Laws. 

We the undersigned committee have considered and passed on the follow- 
ing resolutions offered by Progress Grange, and do not recommend the same. 
We feel the changing of these sections would not be for the best interest of 
our order : 

Resolved', by the State Grange, That we amend the State Constitution of 
the order as follows : 

Amend Article 2, Section 5, by striking out the word "three" before the 
word "dollars" and insert the word "two." 

Amend Article 5, by striking out the word "regular" before the word 
"meeting." 

Amend Article 7, Section 6, by striking out the worfds "the sum of one 
dollar for each man and fifty cents for each woman initiated during the 
quarter." 



N. B. SCHAEFPER, Master Pomona Grange No. 96. 



64 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



Respectfully submitted, 

F. P. WIL.L.ITS, 
J. K. WORMELDORF, 
E. J. C. G(ROTZINGER, 
L. C. KAHLER, 
Mrs. M. J. WELSH. 

The report of the Finance Committee was adopted as read : 

Sunbury, Pa., Dec. 13, 1905. 
To the officers and members of Penn'a. State Grange : 

We, your Finance Committee, beg leave to report that having examined 
the accounts of your Secretary and Treasurer, have found a balance in hand 
Qf the Treasurer of thirteen thousand, four hundred and seventy-two dollars 
and seventy-six cents, ($13,472.76) and all accounts in good order. We con- 
gratulate the State Grange on the excellent condition of its finances. 

^ S. B. BROWN, 

JOHN I. PATTON, ; 

D. B. McWILLIAMS, •' 

Finance Committee. 

The following report of the Committee on Resolutions was adopted as 
read : ' 

To the officers and members of Pennsylvania State Grange : 

Your Committee on Resolutions beg to submit the following report : 

To us has been assigned the pleasant duty to extend to thfe people of 
Sunbury the felicitations of the order. We have in this, our thirty-third an- 
nual meeting, been blessed with beautiful weather. ' The people of this beauti- 
ful city have been more than kind to us. Our meetings have proven har- 
moniouis and instructive and altogether our lines have fallen in pleasant 
places. Therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That we extend to the people of Sunbury our most sincere 
thanks for their more than generous treatment. They have thrown open to 
us the doors of their most beautiful private homes and bid us enter. They 
have laid tribute to beauty, art and song for our amusement and entertain- 
ment and everywhere given us the glad hand. We thank them and assure 
them that when we return to our various liomes scattered all over this vast 
Commonwealth, we will carry with us but the kindest recollections of our 
meeting where the Saisquehanna flows. 

Resolved, That the peaple of Sunbury have a priceless treasure in Fort 
Augusta, and we earnestly advise that tlie State purchase this historic ground,.. 
and that it be preserved for all time as a sacred memento of the nearly for- 
gotten past; and we do most emphatically oppose the erection of a monument 
to the late M. S. Quay at an expense of $20,000, while such an historic spot^ 
filled with such sacred recollections is neglected and all but forgotten. 

Resolved, That we extend to tbe officers of the Penn'a. State Grange and 
to our Legislative Committee our thanks for the earnestness and zeal with 
which they have performed their various duties. We trust they will not 
weary in well doing, but continue to extend its field of usefulness until every 
farmer's home shall be a Granger's home. 

Resolved, That we commend the various officers in the department of Ag- 
riculture for their most excellent work in behalf of the farming interest of 
the State. From Secretary Critchfield down, eacih has done his duty well and 
proven the wisdom of our honored Governor In making all of his appoint- 
ments to office in this department from our active membership. 

Resolved', That we note with satisfaction the good work that Prof. H. A. 
Surface, State Zoologist, is doing in the interests of the fruit growers and 
farmers of this State. We further express our thanks for the bulletins which 
he sends out monthly. They are invaluable to the horticulturist and farmer. 

Resolved, That we especially commend Dr. B. H. Warren for his relent- 
less warefare upon oleo and food adulterations, c WJjiile others have but pro- 
tected our property, to him has been given the duty in a measure, to protect 
the health and lives of the people which he has fully and fearlessly done re- 



65 



^rttlRTY-THlRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



gardless of all the powerful influences that the insatiate greed of vast and 
unscrupulous trusts and financial interests were enabled to array against him. 
And in the event of a National Pure Food Law being enacted by Congress — 
which measure we favor and recommend — we respectfully ask President 
Roosevelt to place him at the head of that department or bureau, knowing full 
well that with him at the head, the people of this great Nation will get a 
square deal; and, 

Whereas, Before the next meeting of this State Grange is held, the people 
of this State will be called upon to elect a new Governor and a new Legisla- 
ture, Therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That we call upon our members everywhere to take an active 
interest in nominating men for the Legislature who are favorable to our In- 
terests, and especially to use every honorable means to defeat the nominatioa 
or election of any man for Governor whose record is not clear on the oleo- 
margarine question. With a Governor and his appointed oflficials not in sym- 
ipathy with us, the State would again become wide open and all our hard won 
battles lost. 

Resolved, That we learn with much satisfaction that the railroads of the 
State lead by the great Pennsylvania Railroad will hereafter issue no more 
free passes, except to their immediate employees. We congratulate the officials 
of the roads for this decision and sincerely hope there may be no string to it. 
We hail this action as an omen of a better day for the people of the State. 
Between the railways and the people of the State there should be no antagon- 
ism. The railroads, by treating all alike and seeking no special privileges, we 
believe, would insure a much better feeling amongst the people and an in- 
creased traflfic. 

Whereas, A very present pressing issue is in relation to the vehicles lately 
put upon our roads. A court has just declared that a timid horse afraid of 
automobiles should be kept off the roads. This is injustice and a dangerous 
and tyranical doctrine. The roads were made by the owners of horses and 
farmers for the use of owners of horses. Owners of horses are a Tiundred to 
one in the majority over owners of automobiles. The latter, some, not the 
many, have made the roads unsafe for farmers' wives and children, There- 
fore, be it, 

Resolved, That recognizing fully the rights of auto owners, the rights of 
other people are not to be ignored or evaded. Protection and regulation of 
the use of highways by auto owners is important and imperative, and the 
ininority interests of right should give way to the majority in numbers and 
importance and priority of claim. 

H. W. RICE, Bucks County, No. 451. 
H. H. T. BROWN, Columbia County, No. 31. 
HARRISON STRAW, Clearfield County, No. 1146. 
E. L. McNETT, Lycoming County. No. 45 4 
THOMPSON LING, Bedford County, No. 531. 

The following report of the Committee on Grievences was adopted as 
read : 

* 

Worthy Master and Patrons : 

We, your Committee on Grievences, are happy to report that peace and 
harmony prevail in our order throughout the State, and we heartily congratu- 
late the State Grange here assembled on the fact that no complaint or griev- 
ence has come before your committee. No better proof is neded that the true 
principles of our order are being carried out thru the length and breadth of 
the Keystone State. ■* 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. OLMSTEAD, Chairman, 

J. H. WINGERT. 

J. B. BRICKER. 

Mrs. A. M. ANDEJRSON. 

Mrs. CYRUS P. CARR. 



66 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



The Education Committee reported as follows : 

Report of Committee on Education. 

This is an age of specialization. In all lines of education the tendency- 
is to train the intellect that it shall be admirably equipped to carry out a 
particular line o^f activity in the after years of life. And this assume^ neces- 
sity for special training in agricultural subjects is being urged upon the at- 
tention of farmers more and more each year. But your committee beg leave 
to state their belief in the idea that the best education for the farmer boy and 
girl is as liberal a training as possible in the fundamental branches coupled 
with that exercise in speaking and debate which will enable them in after 
years to express their thoughts in a forcible and pleasing manner. How often 
the power and influence of a keen and logical intellect is rendered practically 
useless to the rest of mankind because it has never been trained in methods 
of fluent expression. 

It must not be forgotten in the education of farmer boys and girls that 
many of them are destined to enter other callings than that of farming and 
that, therefore.in giving to each of them abroad fundamental education we do 
a service to mankind in general. In following out this principle we urge the 
establishment in every township in this Commonwealth of a high school with 
a course of study leading a child as far as conditions will permit. 

That we should have specialists, there is no doubt; but specialists are born 
not made, and it is only necessary for us to furnish to those researchful minds 
the necessary tools with which to work. To this end our experiment station 
should be carefully and fully equipped. 

The power of the press in formulating public opinion is everywhere ad- 
mitted and your committee favor the enlarging of the "Grange News" by the 
use of the best talent in the Grange for emphasizing the principles and items 
of interest and legislation upon which every member of the Grange should 
be alive. And all papers outside the order should be encouraged by Grangers 
which disseminate our principles. 

The following resolutions were presented to your committee : 
Resolution No. 1 : 

Hall of Randolph Grange, No. 190, P. of H. To the ofl^cers and members of 

the Pennsylvania State Grange. Greeting : 

Wliereas, Education, properly and honestly applied forms the foundation 
stone for the hapipiness of our homes, and also of our nation; and we look to 
the schools in the rural districts as the one great source for obtainihg educa- 
tion; and as we believe, that Graded Schools for the rural districts, and the 
transportation of children at public expense is a possibility easily attained, and 
would be the means of saving a great deal of money, which is now almost 
wholly wasted on account of keeping up schools of from five to ten and fifteen 
pupils; Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we use our influence in every department of the Grange to , 
bring about such legislation as will relieve the tax payers of this terrible waste 
of money and give us good and efl!icient graded schools for the rural districts. 

PHILIP M. CUTSHALL, 
Member of Randolph Grange, No. 190. 

Resolution adopted by Randolph Grange, No. 190, P. of H., Centre Coun- 
ty, Pa. 

Mrs. KATE RUSSELL, Secretary. 
H .J. GRIGGS,, Master. 

The committee hold that the development of this idea is possible under 
present law and that the determination of this matter should be left to the 
townships so that they may best meet their particular needs. 

Action of committee sustained by State Grange. 

Resolution No. 2 : 

Whereas, The progress and prosperity of the Grange and the increase of 
its membership largely depends on the education of the farmers by the dis- 
semination of Grange literature and the promulgation of Grai^ge principles 
and doctrines through the medium of the press, 



67 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL. SESSION OP THE 



-r, , ^ rpi,o4- +v,o c5tntA Orange concurs in the following resolution 

SXges of Crawford County. The resolution is as follows : 

Number 5. . ^ - , <-^ * ♦.v,^ 

Whereas The increase in the number of Granges m Crawford County, the 
constl^t gXth in memberUip and the increasing necessity f^f better nieans 
of oommfnicTtion and co-operation among Grangers, through the medium of 
the p?lS and reTogniSing the important service rendered by the Pennsylvania 
Farmer in the past, Therefore, x,^ .^, -o 

■R/^«olved That this Pwmpna Grange of Crawford County, command the Penn a 
Farmed for Its services in upholding the principles of the Grange, and that 
we adopt it as the special representative and means of communication 
among the Granges of Crawford County. Adopted unanimously. 

Presented by W. J. Graham, Keystone Grange No. 901. 

Your committee desires to express their, appreciation of the Pennsylvania 
Farmer as well as other Grange papers in their constant efforts to dissemi- 
nate Grange literature and Grange principles. 

Adopted. 

Resolution No. 3. 

Whereas There are in our State thousands of animals, birds, insects, etc., 
whose nature's have never been studied as to their usefulness or injurious ef- 
fect upon agriculture, and, 

Whereas, There are many insects, birds, etc., within the bounds of Penn- 
sylvania that are known to be beneficial or injurious, Therefore, be it. 

Resolved, That the Pennsylvania State Grange hereby instructs State 
Master, W. F. Hill to appoint three members as a Zoological Committee, to 
act under the direction of the Economic Zoologist of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment of Pennsylvania, in supervising the collecting and furnishing of speci- 
mens from our Pomona and Subordinate Granges and to further nature study 

among our members. ,^^ „ , ^^^^ 

E. R. MULiFORD, Wellsboro, 1009 

Committee report unfavorably on the above resolution. 
Committee not sustained by the State Grange. 
The resolution was amended so as to read "one person from each county," 
and adopted as amended. 

Report adopted as read. Resolutions acted on separately. Action noted 

on each. 

JOHN A. McSPARRAN, Chairman. 

The Committee on Domestic Economy reported : 
Worthy Master, Sisters and Brothers : 

Having no resolutions to consider, we, the undersigned Committee on 
Household Economy, respectfully submit the following suggestions for the 
consideration of this honorable body : 

We appreciate the honor of being appointed to consider so broad a sub- 
ject, for to us, it implies a very large field for thought. The daughters in our 
farm homes should be educated along the line of house-work, more especially 
cooking. More thorough knowledge of this art, would cause less expenditure 
for medical aid; our courts would have less divorce cases to consider if the 
husbands had less indigestion. In our judgment, the home should be as at- 
tractive as our means will permit. We must teach our daughters to become 
competent in the art of caring for the sick. By so doing they will be a bless- 
ing in the home and may often save the expense of a trained nurse. 

All modern conveniences for lightening the burdens of the home maker 
should be procured as far as possible, thereby giving the wife and daughters 
time to improve their minds. 

One of the many conveniences th^t should be secured if possible Is a 
supply of water in the house. In many farm homes the water could be placed 
in the kitchen sink and all through the house at very little cost. 

The wife should be the co-worker with the husband in all business af- 
fairs. In so doing she will better know how and where to economize? We can- 



68 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



not enumerate the many ways in which economy can be used in the home. If 
each member in the home would use the wisdom given them by our Divine 
Master we are sure no Sheriff would Tiave the opoprtunity of closing the door 
of any farm home. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Mrs. J. J. B'RUNGES. 
Mrs. FRED VANDUSEN, 
Mrs. G. A. POST, 
GEORGE ERK. 
Report adopted. 

The Worthy Chaplain offered the following resolution which was adopted: 

Knowing that all intoxicating drink taken as a beverage is harmful and 
only harmful, physically, morally, and spiritually, and believing that as our 
order stands for the purity of the liome it must stand squarely for temper- 
ance reform. Therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That we heartily endorse the action of the National Grange in 
debarring from membership in our order all engaged in the manufacture and 
sale of intoxicants. 

At this time, the prize banners offered by the Executive Committee to the 
five Granges making the largest gain in membership during the year were 
given out to the following Granges : 

Columbia Grange, No. 83, Bradford County, gain 239. 
Sparta Grange, No. 110 Crawford County, gain 106. 
Hartford Grange, No. 418, Susquehanna County, gain 90. 
Clover Leaf, No. 1265, Erie County, gain 86. 
Jackson, No. 868, Susquehanna County, gain 82. 
Orange closed. 



FRIDA Y MORNING. 



Grange opened in full form. 
The Committee on Dairy Interests reported : 
Worthy Master : 

In making this first report on the dairy industry, your committee feels 
keenly the lack of reliable data upon which to base an exact report, but the 
immensity of the dairy interests, their close and important relation to the 
financial prosperity or financial embarrassment of a large part of our popula- 
tion, their closer and more important relation to the daily food, whether la 
be necessaries or luxuries, and through our food their closest and most im- 
portant relation to the health, comfort and physical well-'being of almost our 
entire population, prompts us to state a few facts and from them draw a few 
conclusions. Pennsylvania lacks a legal standard and a legal test for milk. 
Any real improvement in dairy products must be based on improvement in 
the quality and care of milk. Any general improvement in the quality of 
milk cannot be secured or even hoped for without a legal standard and a legal 
test, therefore your committee recommends that this State Grange go on 
record as favoring legislation that shall cover the following points : 

1. Establish a butterfat standard of richness below which mlik shall not 
be offered for sale in Pennsylvania unless plainly marked "skimmed" or "but- 
termilk." Make the standard 3 5-10 per cent, of butter fat. 

2. Make it a criminal offense, punishable by fine and imprisonment or 
both to offer for sale milk that falls below that standard unless plainly marked 
skimmed or buttermilk. 

3. Establish a double test for milk by the Lactometer for water and by 
the Babcock test for butter fat and make this test competent evidence in 
any court when properly safeguarded so injustice shall not be done. 

Amended by this part being referred to the Legislative Committee. 



69 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



We realize that the passage of this legislation might, and probably would, 
bring hardship and loss to some dairymen, but the day of half-way measures 
is past. When the butter and cheese that comes to our tables is under suspic- 
ion; when the milk that is sold in our crowded cities where it is almost the 
only food of thousands of infants may be watered, skimmed and poisoned, 
shall we let a few dishwater cows block the wheels of progress ? Shall 
we hesitate to say that he who waters or skims or drugs the food of infants is 
a criminal ? These are radical measures, but in our fight with the oleo com- 
bine and food frauds, we need to be radical or nothing. 

We are glad to report that the cheese producers of Northern Penn'a 
have organized and are asking substantially the same legislation as outlined 
above. We, as a committee, have endorsed their legislature plan and recom- 
mend that this State Grange do the same, as it comes to us with the un- 
qualified endorsement of McKean County's Pomona Grange. This organiza- 
tion of the cheese producers is a most hopeful sign as the day of successful 
individual effort is past and the day of organized effort is here. Only organ- 
ized, intelligent, persistent effort can save the dairy interests from serious per- 
manent Injury through the sale of oleo products and filled cheese. Let us, 
therefore, unitedly oppose the lowering of the tax on colored oleo. Let us 
favor the striking out of the word "knowingly" from the present law. Let 
us amend the law that requires the branding of dairy packages that may be 
used again to hold inferior articles. What more can we do ? As individuals, 
let us encourage the organization of dairy owners and associations whose ob- 
jects shall be to produce dairy products of standard purity and excellence. 
Let us unitedly support the enforcement of existing laws; if they are faulty, 
amend them; If they are Inadequate, secure the enactment of adequate laws, 
but let us not delude ourselves by thinking that when a law is passed the 
fight is won. A law Is only a weapon with which to fight and in our fight 
for pure food, ad£quate laws, organized effort and educated public senti- 
ment are the factors that will win if properly directed. Let it be one of the 
objects of the organized Granges of Pennsylvania to so direct these factors 
that every citizen of this great Commonwealth can have his table furnished 
with milk not contaminated with stable filth or bacteria disease; not robbed 
of richness by skimming; not diluted with water, and not poisoned with chem- 
icals; with butter of such excellence that no suspicion of slaughter house 
refuse shall haunt the imagination of the eater; and with cheese tlie 
standard of excellence for the world, the aftertaste of which will leave no sus- 
picion of poor curds, fortified with cotton seed oil. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

J. G. PHELPS, President. 
HORACE H. HAL/L, S«C. 
F. L. RUGGLES, 
Mrs. R. S. HARTLEY., 

Report adopted as read, except that the legislation recommended was re- 
ferred to the Legislative Committee. 

The report of the Committee on Co-operation was adopted as read : 

Report of the Coimnlttee on Co-operation. 

One of the leading and primary objects of the Grange is co-operation in 
its broadest sense. That is what the farmers of this great country need to-day. 
The word co-operation means working together to accomplish a certain end. 

Our Declaration of Purpose declares it to be the purpose of the Grange 
to meet together, talk, buy, sell and in general think and act together for 
our mutual protection. Another principle declares it to be the purpose of the 
order to bring the producer and the consumer, the farmer and the manu- 
facturer closer together into the most direct and friendly relations possible. 

The Pennsylvania State Grange has the most complete and perfect trade 
or business arrangements for the benefit of its members known anywhere. 
Whereby members of the order may avail themselves of the opportunity to 
buy anything they need in quantities to suit the purchaser at wholesale 
prices. 

In order to make these business arrangements effective the entire mem- 
bership should co-operate in buying and selling and thus patronize our busi- 
ness houses; by so doing, members would not only save a considerable amount 
of money on their purchases, but the revenues of the State Grange would be 
increased. 



70 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



We would earnestly urge the necessity of prompt action with our Legis- 
lative Committees both National and State* on all matters affecting our in- 
terests. Watchfulness is required to- hold the advantages already secured 
and with the present reform movement sweeping over our country, efforts to 
obtain legislation advantageous to the farmer's interests are more likely to- 
be successful than in past years. 

We wish to emphasize the advantages of securing insurance at cost, alsa 
in securing such local benefits as rural telephones, rural mail delivery, good 
roads, good schools, etc. 

Your committee would respectfully urge the necessity and importance of 
every member of our order patronizing our Grange papers, particularly the 
"Grange News," and thus co-operate with their editors in elevating and ad- 
vancing the interests of the order throughout the State of Pennsylvania. 

A Grange paper must depend largely upon the members of the order for 
its support, therefore the necessity of co-operation in supporting Grange liter- 
ature which we recognize as an important factor in the work of our order. 

The following resolution was referred to this committee : 

We recommend the adoption of this resolution. 

HERMAN DISHART, Chairman 
, L. WINOHIP. 

■ C. P. SHAW. 

Mrs. M. CARR, 

W. J. PICKERING. 

f. Committee. 

Be it Resolved, That we recommend the opening of Grange Banks in all 
the counties of the State where the Grange so desires, to be conducted on the 
principle of the Grange Insurance Company, 

ULYSSES BIRD, 

HARRY H. GREEN, 

S. P. SHOEMAKER, 

Committee. . 

Elkland Grange, No. 976. Estella, Pa., Dec. 5th, 1905. 

We believe the establishment of Grange Banks in the different counties 
to be a good thing and recommend the adoption of the resolution. Com. 

The following report of the Committee on Dormant Granges was adopted 
as read : " 

Worthy Master : 

Your Committee deplores the fact that there are such things as dormant 
Granges, but their ghostly presence haunts us and probably ever will. When 
once a Grange becomes dormant it is a stench to the whole surrounding at- 
mosphere that is exceedingly hard to cleanse, and it were far better for the 
order had that Grange never existed; therefore, your committee would rec- 
ommend that a closer supervision be maintained over the Subordinate Granges 
and when any Grange begins to exhibit signs of that drowsy, lethargic con- 
dition that precedes sleep, use every available effort to arouse its members to 
a realization of their condition; stir them up and get them moving. To get 
them thoroughly awakened requires a great effort, and as a rule, a cure is only 
effected by the infusion of new blood into the arteries of the Grange, and this 
usually requires outside assistance and influence. 

If the deputy is a live, energetic person, and enthusiastic enough and can 
afford to donate his time and a part of his expenses, Tie can, in time, perhaps^ 
bring about a recovery; but as it is seldom the case that the deputy can afford 
or has the disposition to attempt such a Herculean, and often, thankless 
task, the sleep is allowed to continue and as a r,esult we have another of those 
ghosts of the past — a dormant Grange. 

Your committee believes in that old adage that "An ounce^of prevention 
is worth a pound of cure," and would recommend that your deputies be re- 
quired to visit the Granges under their charge oftener and see that they keep 
out of the ruts; use every effort to suppress all those dissentions and jeal- 
ousies that are so apt to arise; see that each Grange observes strictly the 
ritualistic work; the Constitution and By-Laws of the order; and conducts Its 
business with dispatch and in a business like manner, so that no part of the 



\ 



71 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



nrn^ram is ever allowed to become tedious and tiresome; have plenty of good 
heafthy instruction, Ind spicy literary work. And we would also recommend 
?hat deputies be paid enough for this work so they may be enabled to do It 
thoroughly without financial loss to themselves, as is now the case. 
^^'^'^wlwouTd commend further that newly organized Granges be carefully 
instructed in the fundamental principles of the order and methods of conduct- 
nff their meeting, that will make them most entertaining and instructive, 
thus laving the foundation for a successful Grange, this to be followed by a 
close supervision and careful guidance until its officers have familiarized 
themselves with their work so as to do it with correctness and dispatch, thus 
laying a foundation upon the solid rock of correct business methods. 

We believe if these methods were followed there would be fewer dor- 
mant Granges to pollute the pure atmosphere of our noble order. 

Fraternally submitted, 

THOMAS HURST, 

Mrs. W. H. DORM'BLASSER, 

HENRY MOYER. 

The Committee on Agriculture reported as follows : 

Worthy Master : . i, ^ 

Your committee on Agriculture have considered the resolutions referred 
to them and beg leave to report as follows : 

Resolution No. 1. 

By Moshannon Grange, No. 1272, Centre County, that we ask the ap- 
pointment of a committee by the Worthy Master of the State Grange to in- 
vestigate conditions at the State Experiment Station to see how this institu- 
tion can be made more helpful to the farmers. 

iCHARL.ES C. HEiSS, Master, 
CORA KINKEAD, Sec. 

Endorsed by the committee and they recommend that a committee of 
five members be appointed and that their necessary expenses be paid by the 
State Grange. 

Adopted 

Resolution No. 2. 

Whereas, The Weather Bureau was established by the National Govern- 
ment largely for the benefit of Agriculture and 

Whereas, The telephone is now so extensively used Qver the State that 
many more farmers would receive its benefts if the reports were sent over the 
telephone as well as by telegraph, therefore, 

Resolved, That the Secretary of Agriculture of this State is hereby re- 
quested to make application to the proper authorities to have the weather re- 
ports furnished to telephone centres. 

Endorsed by the committee, provided that the report be sent early in the 
day. 

Adopted 

Resolution No. 3. 

No action by the committee, but adopted by the State Grange. 

Whereas, At the suggestion of a member of the Grange in California, 
Bro. David Lubin, His Majesty Victor Emanuel, King of Italy, issued an in- 
vitation to the various governments of the World to a conference to deter- 
mine the advisability of having an International Institute of Agriculture; and, 

Whereas, It has been recommended by the delegates of the forty-two 
governments represented in this Congress that such an institute be estab- 
lished; and, 

Whereas, This State Grange is satisfied that Agriculture would be digni- 
fied and greatly benefitted by such an International Institute; and. 

Whereas, We believe that the United States Department of Agriculture 
•could through this agency secure data more economically; and. 

Whereas; We believe that this movement would confer a lasting bneeflt 



72 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



upon a few countries now so far in darkness as to have no organized systems 
or departments for the collection of agricultural information and data; and, 

Whereas, We believe further that this movement is conducive to better 
understanding and consequently to the world's peace; Therefore, be it, 

Resolved, that the Pennsylvania State Grange assembled in thirty-third 
annual session hereby approves and endorses the movement for the ad- 
herence of this Government to the same. 

Resolved, That we urge the Secretary of Agriculture, Hon. James "Wilson, 
Washington, D. C, to use his good offices to the attainment of this end. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to President Roosevelt, 
to Secretary of Agriculture, Wilson, and to all members of the United States 
■Congress. 

HORACE F. SMITH, Pineville Grange, No. 507, P. of H. 

R. J. WEL/D, 

J. D. BUNYON, 

W. C. MEREDITH, 

Mrs. S. S. BLYHOLDER. 
Committee. 
Report adopted as read. 



FRIDAY MORNING. 

The Committee on Fruit and Honey interests reported as follows : 

To the Worthy Master and our Fellow Patrons : 

No doubt each Committee regards it own subjects as the most important 
of all assigned to such respective bodies; but the members of this particular 
committee are of the firm, conscientious and unanimous opinion that on most 
of the soils of this State no features of farm practice can give greater financial 
returns and greater pleasure for the amount of land, labor and capital in- 
vested than the proper development of orchards and apiaries. Therefore, it 
is to be seen plainly that the Committee on Fruits and Honey is par excel- 
lence, one of the most important of the many that are to report to-day. 

This committee desires first to express its very cordial approval of the 
successful efforts of our Worthy Master Hill in establishing such special com- 
mittees to start certain lines of much needed good work among the husband- 
men of this Commonwealth for the betterment of themselves, their families, 
and their neighbors. 

In this regard, we trust that his power may have been already the start- 
ing force for the little avalanche of fruit and honey production which will 
slide and slide, and grow and grow, until ere long it may result in having 
covered the sixty-seven counties of the Keystone State in a vernal coat of 
snowy petals, with ovules well fertilized by the "Little Busy Bees" yielding 
their nectar to become the most delicious food of man, as well as resulting in 
an autumnal fruitage of reds, yellows, greens, and russets, such as fill the cel- 
lars, pay the taxes, and feed, clothe and educate the children. 

To achieve any such desideratum, you committee is convinced that tlie 
first and chief work of the Grange should be to strat the forces or machinery 
of the State to obtain by legislation and by official activity such benefits and 
services as will aid all our brother farmers. We, therefore, cordially approve 
the following resolution, which has already received the hearty endorsement 
of State and local horticultural societies, and recommend it for due action 
by the Legislative Committee : 

Whereas, The fruit interests of this great Commonwealth have immense 
latent possibilities, which should be developed for the interests of the agri- 
culturists, and by sucTi development add greatly to the income of the tiller of 
the soil, Therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That we shall endeavor to have our next State Legislature and 
Governor provide for the establishment of a Division of Horticulture in the 
State Department of Agriculture, with a competent State Horticulturist, to 
give us needed, information and help concerning such subjects as the adoption 
of our various lands to certain varieties of fruits, the most remunerative va- 
rieties of fruits to grow, methods of planting and caring for orchards, gather- 
ing, packing, storing and shipping fruits, fruit markets, preventing plant dis- 




THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL, SESSION OF THE 



eases, and such other horticultural subjects as do not at present belong to the 
office of the Economic Zoologist. Be it further 

Resolved, That we request our fellow Patrons of the State Grange to aid 
in securing for all our agricultural citizens the benefits of such an official Hor- 
ticulturist. 

Unanimously passed by Washington Grange, No. 157, 

(Signed) 

IH. A. SURFACE, Master, 
W. E. STOVER, Sec. 

The proper care of trees is becoming of greater importance than ever be- 
fore. For this very reason rascals or incompetent persons have gone over our 
iState treating trees in an injurious and ineffective manner and exacting high 
payment in return. We therefore approve the following resolution : 

Resolved, That we should have legislation providing that no person shall 
treat trees for pay in this State without first receiving a license from the De- 
partment of Agriculture, showing that he has furnished satisfactory evidence 
that he is a reliable person, competent to do such work properly. 

We also approve the following important resolution : 

Resolv/ed, That it is the sense of the Grange in Pennsylvania that the 
farmers and fruit growers should have proper protection from all nurserymen 
and tree dealers who sell trees infested with living San Jose Scale, or Crown 
Gall, or who deliver varieties of trees which later prove to be not true to 
name. We, therefore, recommend a law compelling all who want to sell trees 
In Pennsylvania, first to obtain a license from the Department of Agriculture 
and to give a heavy bond of long term providing against violation of the 
same.. 

Recognizing the necessity of bees in fertilizing flowers and thus setting 
fruits, and their ability to collect without cost, nectar to become the most 
delicious food for man, we agree with the Penn'a. Bee-Keepers' Association 
which represents the interests of 28,000 bee keepers, in approving the follow- 
ing resolution : \ 

Whereas, There has been in this State great loss of bees by a very con- 
tagious disease known as Foul Brood, which threatens the destruction of all 
honey bees in certain regions, which would result in incalculable damage to 
the fruit industry, we recommend the passage of a Foul Brood law, and the 
appointment of an inspector of apiaries in the Division of Zoology, of the De- 
partment of Agriculture, as in several other States at present, to detect and 
eliminate this disease and thus protect the bee-keeping industry and at the 
same time insure the necessary pollination of fruits for our fruit growers. 

Finally, for the general advancement of the fruit and honey interests in 
this State, this committee makes the following recommendations : 

1. A regular department of fruit and honey in the Penn'a. Grange News, 
with contributions and reports from all counties possible. 

2. A Grange Press Bureau, for the definite dissemination of articles upon 
such subjects, showing what the Grange is doing for all branches of Agricul- 
ture in Pennsylvania. 

3. Special Grange programs on fruit and bees. 

4. Exhibits of fruits and honey at Grange meetings and picnics. 

5. Demonstrations of practical methods of manipulating bees, changing 
them from old style box hives to modern frame hives, etc. The State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, acting through the Division of Zoolo^gy and the Penn'a. 
State Bee-Keepers' Association, through its President, H. A. Surface, have 
offered to aid by giving such demonstrations, free of charge, wher.ever pos- 
sible. 

6. Both short and long courses in Horticulture and Agriculture in the 
Penn'a. State College. 

7. Experiments in Horticulture and Agriculture by the Penn'a. Experi- 
ment Station and the Penn'a. Department of Agriculture. 

8. More State publications on these subjects, 

9. The perusal and proper use of recent National publications on fruit 
growing and bee-keeping. 

10. Co-operation of interested persons with the State Horticultural So- 
ciety, which will meet next month (Jan 16 and 17) at Gettysburg, Pa., and with 
the Penn'a. State Bee-Keepers' Association, which meets the 28th and 29th of 
this montli at State College, in Centre County. 

11. The establishment of a State Museum to preserve and exhibit not only 
the natural resources of our great State, but also all varieties of her cultivated 



74 



PENNfiYLVANIA STATE GRANOE. 



L 



products, showing all varieties of fruits, kinds of honey, races of bees, and 
other material in interest to the fruit growers and bee-keepers in special and 
the husbandmen in general. 

12. The appointment of permanent State and local committees on fruits, 
bees, zoology, museums, etc., to advance the work of the State on one hand 
and the interests of the local patrons on the other, as is now being done in 
such very progressive counties as Tioga and Bradford. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by the committee on Fruits and 
Honey. 

H. A. SURFACE, Chairman. 

The report was adopted as read, except that the legislation asked for was 
referred to the Legislative Committee. 

On motion of Bro. S. S. Blyholder, is was ordered that the Worthy Master 
appoint a committee of three to consider a more expeditious method of con- 
ducting the election of officers in the State Grange and to report to the next 
State meeting. 

Hon. Mortimer Whitehead, Worthy Past Lecturer of the National Grange 
was introduced and addressed the Grange jn his usual happy and appropriate 
manner. 

Bro. H. H. Hall, of Potter County, offered tlie following resolutions : 

Resolved, That four thousand dollars ($4,000.00) be appropriated from 
the treasury of the State Grange as payment of $16,000 subscriptions to the 
Penn'a. Grange News. 

Resolved', That copies be sent to lists of subscribers furnished by the 
various Subordinate Granges. 

> Resolved, That the Executive Committee be directed to enter the publi- 
cation under act of Congress authorizing the publication to carry legitimate 
advertising. 

Resolved, That the Executive Committee shall present to the State Grange 
a full and complete report of the receipts and expenditures incident to this 
publicatiotn. 

The resolutions were agreed to. 

Mr. J. G. Chesnutt, Secretary of the Business Men's Association was called 
upon and gave a pleasing talk. 

Bro. G. W. Oster, of the Executive Committee, introduced the following 

resolution : 

Resolved, That the thanks of this body are due especially to our friend 
Mr. J. G. Chesnutt, for his untiring efforts in assisting to make all necessary 
arrangements for our State Grange meetine- and in caring for our delegates 
and for the kindly interest manifested in our behalf during our sta^'^ here. 

Adopted by a unanimous vote. 



The Credentials Committee reported as follows : 



Report of Credential Committee. 



ALLEGHENY. 

897 J. W. Burkett, 9.95 

1186 R. K. McEwen 10.05 

904 Wm. H.Ramsey , 10,30 

ARMSTRONG 

487 M. E. Pence 

515 T. A. Fiscus 9.15 

549 S. S. Blyholder, 13.98 

549 Mrs. S. S. Blyholder, . . . 13.98 

593 Wm. Hayes, 9.34 

872 T. C. Heath 13.00 

872 Mrs. T. C. Heath, 13.00 

915 Wm. Crosby 9.35 



531 
607 
619 
737 
1164 



29 
551 



510 
1137 



BEDFORD. 



T. Ling, 

L. W. McMillen, 

J. J. Hershberger 

Chas. Bowser, 

John L. Longenecker, . . 

BERKS. 

Hon. F. Leonard Reber,, 
E. M. Dinger, , 



BLAIR. 



Wm. Slippy, . 
W. S. Leighty, 



7.28 
6.50 
6.15 
6.15 
6.15 



3.55 

4.44 



6.30 
5.70 



7i 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SEiSSION OF THE 



1154 

1275 

664 

889 



83 
111 
111 
153 
153 
155 
155 
173 
174 
174 
182 
182 
205 
257 
257 
272 
354 
1161 
1228 
58 
178 
178 
204 
204 
214 
214 
512 
512 
754 



507 
507 
684 
684 
451 



133 
244 
244 
570 
908 
1105 
370 



1115 
1116 
1117 
1118 
1121 
1121 
1122 
1123 
1124 
1125 
1125 
1128 
1135 
1168 
11? 6 
1119 



H. S. Wertz 5.60 

Martin L. Gates, 5.30 

H. P. Cox 5.00 

D. B. Coleman, 5.25 

BRADFORD. 

C. P. Shaw ! 3.90 

Frank S. Worley 5.45 

Mrs. Frank S. Worley,.. 5.45 

J. O. Tomlinson, 3.17 

Mrs. J. O. Tomlinson, . . 3.17 

B. E. Rockwell ,. . 3.71 

Mrs, B. E. Rockwell, 3.71 

J. C. Greening, 5.95 

Willis E. Soper, 3.90 

Mrs. Willis E. Soper, ... 3.90 

A. Z. Mason 1 3.71 

Mrs. A. Z. Mason, 3.71 

W. H. Layman, 4.40 

John D. Bunyan, 3.57 

Mrs. John D. Bunyan,.. 3.57 

C. H. Jennings, 5.45 

D. N. Van Knew, 5.01 

Harry Fraley, 5.45 

D. O. Sullivan, 5.45 

Hon. Louis Piolett 5.80 

L. S. Tyler, 5.00 

Mrs. L. S. Tyler 5.00 

T. S. Wilcox, . 3.46 

Mrs. T. S. Wilcox, 3.46 

J. N. Harris, 5.45 

Mrs. J. N. Harris, 5.45 

Geo. W. Teeter 5.45 

Mrs. Geo. W. Teeter,. . . . 5.45 

W. L. Lawrence, 3.18 

BUCKS. 

Horace Smith 7.02 

Mrs. Horace Smith, 7.02 

Samuel Hibbs 7.34 

Mrs. Samuel Hibbs, 7.34 

Hampton W. Rice 8.00 

BUTLER. 

Jacob Albert, 10.35 

S. L. Raisley, 10.35 

Mrs. S. L. Raisley, ..... 10.35 

R. L. Campbell, . 11.05 

B. R. Ramsey 12.15 

James B. Bricker, 9.80 

Eva McJunkin, 11.00 

CAMBRIA. 

Sylvester Bradley, ..... 6.10 

B. W. Parrish, 6.30 

J. W. Griffin 6.20 

H. J. Ivory 6.08 

A. B. Kirsch, 7.60 

Mrs. A. B. Kirsch, 7.60 

J. J. Evans 6.30 

Isaac J. Hughes, ....... 6.24 

John A. Baver, 7.76 

Chas. Yeakley 6.34 

Mrs. Chas. Yeakley,.... 6.34 

Miss Rose Carl 6.59 

W. K. Douglas 6.14 

j£cob Warner 6.59 

James A. Farabaugh, . . . 6.10 

Lyman Sherbine, 6.24 



1032 



96 

96 

109 

109 
151 
157 
157 
159 
159 
223 
296 
297 
757 
757 
1272 
1272 
1284 
254 
254 
158 
290 
290 



19 

60 

63 

63 

67 

67 

121 

980 

980 

1179 

1179 

1263 

1269 

1220 

141 



563 

625 

654 

654 

735 

.735 

1101 

1221 

1221 



534 
584 
584 
623 
802 
802 
808 
808 
964 
1145 
1145 



CARBON. 

Ralph Eroh, 2.77 

CENTRE. 

N. B. SchafCer, . 2.30 

Mrs. N. B. Schaffer, 2.30 

L. K. Dale 3.00 

Mrs. L. K. Dale 3.00 

Geo. Noll, 3.51 

Dr. H. A. Surface, 2.66 

Mrs. Dr. H. A. Surface,. . 2.66 

Nathan Grove, 5.30 

Agnes M. Grove 5.30 

J. W. Orr, 3.16 

Marselleus Sankey, .... 3.08 

C. V. Gruver 3.15 

J. A. Hoy, 3.94 

Mrs. J. A. Hoy 3.94 

Chas. C. Hess, 5.75 

Mrs. Chas. C. Hess, .... 5.75 

R. D. Ardry 4.08 

E. C. Musser, 2.60 

Mrs. E. C. Musser 2.60 

J. A. McClintic, 3.10 

J. P. Eves 4.10 

Mrs. J. P. Eves, 4.10 

CHESTER. 

Hugh E. Steele 5.52 

W. Hunter Little, 5.42 

Thos. L. Passmore 5.32 

Mrs. Thomas L Passmore 5.32 

Oscar G. Hoops 7.75 

Mrs. Oscar G. Hoops. ... 7.75 

Ezra Thomas 6.50 

Wm. B. Coates 4.56 

Mrs. Wm. B. Coates.... 4.56 

George W. Cook 5.02 

Mrs. Geo. W. Cook 5.02 

W. E. Baldwin 5.20 

E. Ralph paker 8.03 

W. Logan Rogers 5.02 

S. E. Nivin 0.00 

CLARION 

C. F. Reinsel 10.60 

Frang Hartman 14.50 

J. L. Frampton 10.79 

Mrs. J. L. Frampton..,. 10.79 

J. A. Smith 14.86 

Mrs. J. A. Smith 14.86 

Frances DeVilder 11.39 

A. J. Frampton 10.71 

Mrs. A. J. Frampton.... 10.71 

CLEARFIELD. 

Prank Haag 10.28 

B. J. Mead 5.41 

Mrs. B. J. Mead 5.41 

John W. Nelson 5.68 

Alfred Wells 6.90 

Mrs. Alfred Wells 6.90 

Samuel Kline 6.70 

Mrs. Samuel Kline 6.70 

Joseph Seyler 6.90 

J. J. Bloom 5.90 

Mrs. J. J. Bloom 5.90 



76 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



1201 
1218 
1219 
1219 
1222 
1222 
1240 
1240 
1241 
1241 
1283 
1285 
1146 



334 

334 

378 

378 

1189 

1255 

1267 

303 

303 

274 



46 

46 

52 

52 

56 

56 

88 

108 

128 

291 

31 

322 

322 



110 
110 
135 
135 
164 
168 
168 
,190 
344 
502 
502 
556 
556 
694 
764 
800 
838 
844 
858 
858 
871 
871 
880 
880 
951 
951 
936 
958 



L. W. Rowland 7.16 

August Weber 6.90 

J. R. Wilson 5.41 

Mrs. J. R. Wilson 5.41 

E. J. Cunningham 6.70 

Mrs. E. J. Cunningham 6.70 

Geo. R. Woodward 6.32 

Mrs. Geo. R. Woodward. 6.32 

H. J. Diem 6.55 

Mrs. H. J. Diem 6.55 

J. H. Weaver _..... 6.92 

Theodore Hoyt 6.70 

Harrison Straw 6.46 

CLINTON. 

W. H. Dornblaser 2.60 

Mrs. W. H. Dornblaaer. . 2.60 

George Peters 4.28 

Mrs. Geo. Peters 4.28 

A. T. Baird 2.72 

C. C. Ricker 2.37 

J. F. Gross 2.73 

W. W. W. Welch 2.70 

Ella M. Welch .2.70 

J. A. Herr 2.95 

COLUBMIA. 

L. M. Creveling 2.16 

Mrs. L. M. Creveling. . . . 2.16 

Mm. Eves 1.78 

Mrs. Wm. Eves 1.78 

A. C. Creasy 1.36 

Mrs. A. C. Creasy 1.36 

Samuel R. Kline 2.10 

J. S. Campbell 1.75 

J. M. Walch 1.76 

T. E. Moore 

H. H. Brown 1.21 

H. G. Supplee 1.10 

Mrs. H. G. Supplee..^... 1.10 

CRAWFORD. 

Chas. Thompson _. . . 10.55 

Mrs. Chas. Thompson. . 10.55 

Arthur Roswell 11.09 

Mrs. Arthur Roswell... 11.09 

M. J. Custead 11.72 

Menry Moyer 11.16 

Mrs. Henry Moyer 11.16 

H. J. Griggs 11.72 

G. B. Hanna 14.29 

J. G. Phelps 13.30 

Mrs. J. G. Phelps 13.30 

L. N. Offensend 12.87 

Mrs. L. N. Offensend 12.87 

H. A. Hall. . 14.50 

Miss Laura Bhrgott 11.69 

Henry E. Aspey 11.43 

S. B. Lawrence 12.91 

J. A. Wilson 14.50 

Chas. C. Morehead 10.30 

Mrs. Chas. C. Morehead. 10.30 

S. A. Townsend 12.91 

Mrs. S. A. Townsend... 12.91 

Fred Webster ._. . 12.87 

Mrs. Fred Webster 12.87 

Wm. J. Graham 11.43 

Mrs. Wm. J. Ghaham. . 11.43 

W. C. Williams 11.72 

Mrs. Lillian King 10.50 



958 

988 

988 

1112 

1112 

1177 

1181 

1239 

263 

1233 



362 



1141 
1141 
1231 
1279 
1279 
1173 
1173 



628 
1155 
1174 
1178 



55 

89 

89 

147 

147 

226 

226 

385 

385 

947 

947 

1079 

1079 

1257 

1257 

1265 

1265 

106 

106 

131 

131 

997 

997 



419 
785 
1022 
1052 
1091 
1109 
1144 
1169 



1282 



853 



Mrs. W. H. King 10.50 

Clara Cole 11.45 

Mrs. Albert Cole 11.45 

George F. Tower 12.91 

Mrs. Geo. F. Tower 12.91 

Wm. E. Wright 11.77 

Nestor Ducovy 11.72 

Ray V. McCurdy 10.30 

M. V. Sperry.- 12.91 

J. C. Wickers 13.11 

CUMBERLAND. 
G. A. Trimmer 3.74 

DELAWARE. 

Prank P. Willits 8.04 

Elizabeth Willits 8.04 

Sellers Hoffman 6.63 

Herbert Getty 6.42 

Emma Getty 6.42 

A. L. Warrell 7.00 

Mrs. A. L. Warrell 7.00 

ELK. 

W. H. Meredith 7.79 

Edward Grotzinger 6.38 

C. P. Taylor 9.16 

Wolf Nicklas 6.38 

ERIE. 

Lee Perkins 10.05 

J. P. Baker 10.50 

Mrs. J. P. Baker. ^ 10.50 

H. H. Rose 10.50 

Mrs. H. H. Rose 10.50 

Geo. Warfield 10.50 

Mrs Geo, Warfield 10.50 

Geo. C. Sewell 11.85 

Mrs. Geo. C. Sewell.... 11.85 

Archie Billings 12.50 

Mrs. Archie Billings 12.50 

P. A. Root 11.55 

Mrs. P. A. Root 11.55 

Geo. Eagley 12.55 

Mrs. Geo. Eagley 12.55 

George Youngs 12^^50 

Mrs. George Youngs.... 12.50 

P. J. Carson 10.25 

Mrs. P. J. Carson 10.25 

H. W. Pollock 10.75 

Mrs. H. W. Pollock 10.75 

Thomas Hurst 12.45 

Mrs. Thomas Hurst 12.45 

FAYETTE. 

W. D. Hixon 9.40 

Wm. L. Newcomer 

Arthur P. Freed \ . 9.47 

S. W. Dunn lO.OO 

C. L. Swartz 

C. K. Brooks. 10.20 

James Murphy 10.38 

Hazen Rlttenhouse 10.00 

FRANKLIN. 

M. S. Herman 4.74 

FOREST. 
Fred Weingard 15.40 



77 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OP THE 



119 

330 

368 

951 

956 

978 

978 

1196 

1226 

1210 

1210 

914 

914 

375 

1134 

1134 



176 
573 



503 

609 

609 

854 

854 

1264 

1264 

1290 

770 

691 



772 
774 
774 
781 
786 
786 
1094 
776 



251 
1029 
1198 
1198 
1199 
1200 
1200 

899 



66 



567 
567 
812 
812 
819 
819 
830 
1026 
219 



HUNTINGDON. 

J. L. Grove 3.70 

John H. Wilson 4.00 

M. W. Dell 3.20 

Thomas McCall 3.21 

E. E. Gutshall 4.70 

E. J. Stover 4.70 

Mrs. E. J. Stover 4.70 

R. W. Hudson 5.40 

W. L. Mosser 4.00 

O. M. Wright 3.65 

Rachael Wright 3.65 

Prof. L. E. Boyer 4*45 

Mrs. Li, E. Boyer 4.45 

W. W. Black 4.70 

W. T. Boring.. 3.65 

Mrs. W. T. Boring..... 3.65 

INDIANA. 

R. E. Dixon 8.20 

G. W. Treese 11.34 

JEFFERSON. 

C. A. Morris 8.35 

E. E. Bullers 7.99 

Mrs. E. E. Bullers 7.99 

John Dougherty •. . . 8.60 

Mrs. John Dougherty. . . 8.60 

Jacob Womelsdorf 8.21 

Mrs.Jacob Womelsdorf. . 8.21 

R. J. Fitsimons 12.00 

J. O. Allshouse 8.50 

J. M. Perrin 6.80 

< 

JUNIATA. 

R. W. Gilliford 3.35 

S. B. Crawford 4.40 

Mrs. S. B. Crawford... 4.40 

J. Scott McLaughlin.... 4.20 

Joseph Hostetler 3.45 

'Mrs. Joseph Hos'tetler. . 3.45 

Samuel Divin 3.95 

B. P. Clark 3.00 

LACKAWANNA. 

T. N. Morrow 3.48 

Lionel Winship 3.70 

Mrs. G. A. Post 3.80 

Mr. G. A. Post 3.80 

Samuel Kennedy 3.60 

H. E. Capwell 3.60 

Mrs. H. E. Capwell.... 3.60 

M. W. Foley 3.55 

LANCASTER. 

John A. McSparren. ... 5.05 

LUZERNE. 

A. M. Anderson 2.55 

Mrs. A. M. Anderson... 2.55 

H.^ G. DeLong 3.30 

Mrs. H. G. DeLong 3.30 

F. L. Ruggles 3.15 

Mrs. F. L. Ruagles 3.15 

Stanley Mosier 3.35 

G. B. Machell 3.27 

T. E. Moore 1.^46 



668 J. E. Marcy 2.85 

668 Mrs. J. E. Marcy 2.85 

813 P. G. Shulde 3.15 

LYCOMING. 

27 L. C. Kahler 1.50 

27 Mrs. L. C. Kahler...'... 1.50 

1 Prank Porter 1.00 

1160 W^. W. Poust 1.10 

1244 Joel Baker 76 

454 E. L. McNett 2.99 

454 Mrs. E. L. McNett 2.99 

McKEAN. 

1182 W.Sawyer 6.50 

1182 Mrs. W. Sawyer 6.50 

1190 Eugene Day 6.84 

1190 Eugenia Day. 6.84 

1212 F. S. Holmes 6.84 

1212 Mrs. P. S. Holmes. 7 6.84 

1236 C. H. Holcomb 6.80 

1236 Mrs. C. H. Holcomb 6.80 

1237 M. J. Welsch 6.97 

1237 Mrs. M. J. Welsch 6.97 

1238 A. A. Abbey 6.84 

1238 Mrs. A. A. Abbey 6.84 

1263 H. J. Butler 8.25 

MERCER. 

393 G. H. Nicklin 13.27 

393 Mrs. G. H. Nicklin. 13.27 

538 W. J. Koon 15.20 

538 Grace Koon 15.20 

608 John C. Clark 14.49 

608 Mrs. John C. Clark 14.49 

658 R. K. Baker 13.77 

MIFFLIN. 
731 F. L McCoy 2.65 

MONTOUR. 

57 Chas. V. Ammerman.... 48* 

65 J. H. Litchard 1.28 

65 Mrs. J. H. Litchard 1.28 

34 E. M. Mourer 1.28 

34 Mrs. B. M. Mourer 1.28 

941 J. C. Benfleld 50 

941 Mrs. J. C. Benfield 50 

1150 A. H. Litchard 1.25 

1150 Mrs. A. H. Litchard..., 1.25 

1108 C. C. Billmeyer 50 

1108 Mrs. C. C. Billmeyer... .50 

N O RTH AM PTON. 

829 W. M. Benninger 3.50 

993 Albin P. Meyer 5.20 

993 Amanda R. Meyer 5.20 

1191 Amzy A. Prey 

NORTHAMPTON. 

249 C. N. Marsh 50 

1148 D. G. Moyer 37 

1148 Mrs. D. G. Moyer 37 

865 Joseph Benner .75 

865 Mrs. Joseph Benner 75 

68 John H. Moyer 1.10 



78 



PEISTNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE. 



PERRY. 

1069 Annie W. Moore 4.90 

PHIJjADELPHIA. 

645 Mrs. Katharine Barnes 6.20 

POTTER. 

1149 Charles Traub 5.53 

1149 Mrs. Charles Traub.... 5.53 

1183 A. S. Worden 6.25 

1183 Mrs. A. S. Worden 6.25 

1193 C. P. Bertch 6.00 

1194 A. O. Lewis ^. . . . 6.65 

1194 Mrs. A. O. Lewis 6.65 

1207 J. S. Hopkins 8.05 

1207 Mrs. J. S. Hopkins 8.05 

1216 H. S. Lent 10.70 

1216 Mrs. H. S. Lent 10.70 

1246 M. E. Baker 7-.06 

1246 Mrs. M. E. Baker 7.06 

1247 L. O. Prince 7.92 

1247 Mrs. L. O. Prince 7.92 

1248 Wallace Burdic 7.31 

1248 Mrs. Wallace Burdic... 7.31 

1254 O. L. Hall 9.06 

1254 Mrs. O. L. Hall 9.06 

1288 James HemipTcill 7.50 

1203 Grant U. Thompkins. .. . 6.24 

1203 Mrs. Grant U.Thompkins 6.24 

1204 H. H. Hall. . '. 9.68 

1251 Daniel Clark 7.50 

SCHUYLKILL. 

1242 Rufus Coleman 3,00 

1256 John Schoener 3.60 

1256 Mrs. John Schoener 3.60 

SNYDER. 

191 Benj. Hummell 26 

SOMERSET. 

877 Lowan Ash 7.73 

877 Marian Ash 7.73 

878 Alex. Coleman 10.12 

879 A. Kent Miller 8.74 

SULLIVAN. 

365 Abbah Erie 4.85 

976 E. G. Rogers 3.72 

1224 Mrs. Lewis B. Zaner 3.70 

SUSQUEHANNA. 

74 R. S. Searle 5.40 

246 E. D. Snyder 4.21 

246 Mr,s. E. D. Snyder 4.21 

289 O. C. Tingley 4.65 

289 Mrs. O. C. Tingley 4.65 

339 L. E. Griffls 6.72 

342 P. S. Williams 4.92 

342 Mrs. P. S. Williams 4.92 

417 C. D. Dayton 5.15 

417 Mrs. C. D. Dayton 5.15 

806 A. C. Lowe 4.75 

806 Mrs. A. W. Lowe 4.75 

860 L. B. Whitney 5.00 

868 Mrs. L. B. Whitney 5.00 



873 T. L. Muzzy 4.65 

873 Mrs. T. L. Muzzy 4.65 

913 George B. Van Ettan 3.95 

1018 A.M.Williams 4.08 

1018 Mrs. A. M. Williams 4.08 

1157 George Bedell 5.08 

1157 Mrs. George Bedell 5.08 

1166 Page Lyman 5.25 

1166 Mrs. Page Lyman 5.25 

1227 P. L. Touhey 8.60 

1209 J. F. Whited 7.07 

927 M. L. Bolles 4.55 

101 B. B. Lowe 4.22 

101 Mrs. B. B. Lowe 4.22 

152 Charles J. Rockwell 4.12 

418 F. P. Forsythe 6.10 

418 Mrs. F. P. Forsythe.... 6.10 

952 E. E. Tower 4.95 

952 Mrs. E. E. Tower 4.95 

1188 T. W. Jackson 4.22 

1188 Mrs. T. W. Jackson 4.22 

TIOGA. 

84 R. P. Ripley 5.55 

293 L. S. Stull 2.75 

293 Mrs. L. S. Stull 2.75 

384 H. Roblyer 4.70 

384 Mrs. H. Roblyer 4.70 

600 Wallace Chase 

600 Mrs. Wallace Chase 

817 Fred Van Dusen 6.00 

817 Mrs. Fred Van Dusen... 6.00 

841 James N. Leonard 6.00 

841 Mrs. James N. Leonard. . 6.00 

902 S. S. Scranton 4.70 

905 Arthur Stearns 6.00 

905 Mrs. Arthur Stearns 6.00 

912 F.C.Smith 6.00 

912 Mrs. F. C. Smith 6.00 

913 V. A. Whitaker 4.70 

913 Mrs. V. A. Whitaker 4.70 

918 C. D. Kingsley 6.15 

918 Mrs. C. D. Kingsley 6.15 

929 F.J.Ashley 4.70 

929 Mrs. F. J. Ashley 4.70 

957 M. Carr 6.00 

957 Mrs. M. Carr ^ 6,00 

966 Jacob Doan T 6,92 

966 Mrs. Jacob Doan 6.92 

981 E. E. Holmes 6.00 

981 Mrs. E. E. Holmes. . . , 6.00 
989 L. M. Franklin 6.00 

989 Mrs. L, M. Franklin 6.00 

1009 J. E. Spencer 4.70 

1009 Mrs. J, E. Spencer 4.70 

1016 E. O. Connelly 4.70 

1016 Mrs. E. O, Connelly 4.70 

1017 F. C. Erway 4^70 

1017 Mrs. P. C. Erway 4.70 

1033 C, A. Buckley 5.48 

1047 Chas. E. Benter.. 9.72 

1047 Mrs. Chas. E, Benter 9.72 

1056 O. B. Brion 9.72 

1078 C. W. Mascho 6.00 

1078 Mrs. C. W, Mascho 6.09 

1088 W. N. Guernsey 6,00 

1092 E. W, Messner 2,75 

1092 Mrs, E. W, Messner 2,75 

1113 C. H. Watrous..., 5.29 



79 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION OF THE 



1136 


1136 


1223 


1223 


54 


54 


705 


705 


784 


784 


937 


32 


32 


434 


434 


1131 


1131 


284 


284 


236 


236 


407 


407 


839 


875 


875 


911 


1025 


1025 


1042 


1068 


1090 


1090 


1143 


1143 


1151 


1151 


1205 


1205 


1208 


846 


847 


847 


314 


1055 


1055 



S. p. Beach 1.40 

Mrs. S. P. Beach 1.40 

Wlllard Redner 5.10 

Mrs. Willard Redner. . . . 5.10 

Philander Bockus 4.85 

Mrs. Philander Bockus. . 4.85 

R. P. Erway 4.90 

Mrs. R. P. Erway 4.90 

D. L. Preston 3.17 

Mrs. D. Li. Preston 3.17 

J. W. Green 5.42 

UNION. 

Henry J. Sypher 75 

Mrs. Henry J. Sypher. . . .75 

J. H. Wingert 39 

Mrs. J. H. Wingert 39 

VENANOO. 

R. N. H. Boal 11.41 

Mrs. R. N. H. Boal 11.41 

Chas. Shaffer 10.30 

Mrs. Chas. Shaffer 10.30 

WARREN. 

A, H. Olmstead 10.03 

Mrs, A. H. Olmstead.... 10,03 

R. S, Hartley 9,63 

Mrs. R. S. Hartley 9.63 

Clare E. Mix 9.25 

C. N. Dodd 10.05 

Mrs. C, N, Dodd 10.05 

Lyman H. Walling 8.90 

E. D. Stewart 8.90 

Mrs. E: D. Stewart 8.90 

Martin Morgan 8.90 

R. M. Michleson 9.80 

N. S. Wheelock...! 9.80 

Mrs. N. S. Wheelock.... 9.80 

Otto Marker 8.90 

Mrs. Otto Marker 8.90 

Mrs. Bertha Thomson... 9.80 

Mr. Thomson 9.80 

A. W. Reeves 9.74 

Mrs. A. W. Reeves 9.74 

O. E. Hoop 9.58 

Mrs. Wm. Delamater... 9.65 

R. J. Weld 9.85 

Mrs. R. J. Weld 9.85 

WASHINGTON. 

J. Elliott Stewart 14.00 

W. J. Coulson 12.05 

Mrs. J. W. Coulson 12.05 



1276 J. H. McElheny 10.6& 

1276 Mrs. J. H, McElheny 10.65 

179 J, B. Painter 13.7a 

116# W. B, Galley 9.95 

1164 Mrs. W. B. Galley 9.95 

WAYNE. 

898 Eugene Quinton 3,70 

898 Mrs, Eugene Quinton.., 3.70 

977 Joseph Quinton 3.70 

977 Mrs. Joseph Quinton 3.70 

1041 W. M. Norton ^... 4.37 

1071 I. F. Taylor 3.85 

1074 S. C. Bates 4.82 

1089 George Erk 4.67 

848 M.N.Clark 8.60 

704 W. F. Holtzer 8.70 

835 C. D. Eiisman 8,70 

1011 L. E. Keller 9.40 

1011 Mrs. L. E. Keller 9.40 

862 D. N. Kepple 8.70 

862 Mrs. D. N. Kepple 8.70 

WYOMING. 

152 C. J, Rockwell 

165 J. V. Sturdevant 3.80 

165 Mrs. J. V. Sturdevant... 3.80 

178 L. S. Tyler 

178 Mrs. L. S. Tyler 

209 Mrs. J. J. Brunges 3.80 

321 Ilsaac Tague 4.70 

400 L. H. Cornell 4.30 

400 Mrs. L. H. Cornell 4.30 

508 A. A. Clayton 4.3(i 

508 Mrs. A. A. Clayton 4".30 

1139 G. P. Jennings 4.40 

1139 Mrs. G. P. Jennings 4.40 

1188 T. W. Jackson 

1188 Mrs. T. W. Jackson.'. . . . 

1245 C. A. Sisk.... 3.70 

1245 Mrs. C. A. Sisk 3.70 

1249 S. L. Jayne 4.55 

1261 Mrs. E. L. Bacon 4.28 

1261 E. L. Bacon 4.25 

1250 A. B. Sharp .' 4.20 

641 Gordon J. Austin 3.35 

820 G. W. Orcutt 3.72 

926 F. H. Fassett 4.39 

YORK. 

810 Prof. Daniel Eberly 4,05 

1270 W. S, Newcomer 3.86 

1270 Mrs, W. S. Newcomer,.. 3.86 



H, ROBLYER, 

JAMES. H. FARABAUGH, 

Committee. 

No further business appearing, Grange closed in full form with the Pa- 
tron's chain at 11:35, a. m. 

J. T. AILMAN, Secretary. 



€ 



80 



^ 



Mi 






*■■(.- v, 



«ll 



Officers of the Pennsylvania State Grang^e 

Master, W. F. HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 

Overseer, HON. A. C. BARRETT, New Milford, Susquehanna Co. 

Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Co. 

Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, Goshonville, Chester Co. 

Chaplain, REV. J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 

Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 

Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 

Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. * 

Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 

Flora, MRS. J. S. Dale, State College, Centre Co. 

Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHER, Lincoln University, Chester Co, 

L. A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, MiUviUage, Erie Co. 



it-j-r. 



Kxectitive Committee 

I. FRANK CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 

G. W, OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



Finance Committee 

D. B. Mo WILLIAMS, Burnham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

J OHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co. 



I^e^islative Comn&ittee 

W. F.HILL.Chamber«barg, Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co. 
E. B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



4 

«» 



^:m: 



Itl 



Officers of tHe Penxisylvaziia State Grange 

Master, W.F.HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
Overseer, HON. A. C. BARRETT, New Milford, Susquehanna Co. 
-^ Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Co. 
Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, GoshonviUe, Chester Co. 
Chaplain, REV. J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 
Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 
Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Tkompson town, Juniata Co. 
Gatekeeper, WALLACE CEASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 
Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 
Flora, MRS. J. S. Dale, State College, Centre Co. 
Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHE R, Lincobi University, Chestt^r G> 
L, A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, MiUvillago, Erie Co. 



s.,.-- 



Kxectitive Committee 

I. FRANK CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 

G. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford C 



Finance Committee 

D. B. Mo WILLIAMS, Burnham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

JOHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co 



I^e^islative Committee 

W. F.HILL. Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co, 
E. B. DORSETT, WeUsboro, Tioga Co. 



«i» 






'•"" \1 






-7, 



AGRfCULTURAL LIBRARY 
THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 




CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 





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VOL. IL No. 7 



FEBRUARY, J906 



25 Cents pbx. Ybak 
5 Cents per. Copt 



G. W. OSTER, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. 



W. F. SJIjTj. 
Editor. 

W. T. GREASY, 

Editor IvCgislative Committee Departmeat 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered January 13, 1906, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, uuder Actof Congress of March 3 1879. 



Auditing Grange Acoonnts. 

The following are copies of replies 
made by the Worthy Master in an- 
swer to problems arising in Subordin- 
ate Grange administration. It is not 
necessary to suggest that all copies 
oif Penn'a Grange News be read and 
preserved, as every member who 
wants to be up on Grange work will 
see the benefit in doing that : 

Worthy Master : 

You state that the books of your 
Grange have never been audited since 
organization and that they are In a 
badly mixed up condition. With re- 
gard to this I have to say that there 
is no possible excuse for such a condi- 
tion of affairs in your Grange nor in 
any other. The Master of every 
Grange on the night of his installa- 
tion is to appoint a Finance Comntlt- 
tee to consist of three members to 
serve during the year. In addition 
to examining all bills previous to 
their being passed upon by the Grange 
it is the duty of this Committee to 
examine and audit the books of the 
Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Grange. This should be done at least 
semi-annually, and at the time that 
the adit is made they shoul denter 
in each book their findings at that 
date. Then when the next audit is 
made they will need to go back only 
to the tlm eof the last audit. If you 
will refer to the Constitution of our 
Order you will see that this matter Is 
specially provided for. Grange btisl- 
iiem", like arty other business, shoul,d 
^e conducted In aocordance with rec- 
ognized business methods and prac- 
tices. It is a part of your duty as the 
Master of a Subordinate Grange to 
see to it that this Committee as well 



as every other Committee and all 
other officers do tlieir work properly. 
Have this committee get to work at 
once and straighten up the^books of 
your Gr&nge and under no clrcum- 
stan'ces allow the matter of auditing 
once or twice each year to go undone. 
Lax business methods, careless prac* 
tices, lead to confusion, dissatisfac- 
tion and dormancy In a Graiiigeip 
systematic methods reflect credit VLVon 
the membership and officers of siay' 
Grange and tend to the up-buildlngr 
of the order. Am pleased to iiiiote^ 
that you have appointed the IiesllilA- 
tlve Committee in your SubordlZMbte - 
Grange, and I trust that "a proper 
auditing of, £Lnd supervlslotn over, the ' 
business affairs of your Grange will 
soon place you on a strong'and sound i 
financial basis. 



Children at Grange Meetings,, 

Worthy Master and Bro.: — T 

I am In receipt of your communloa.^ 
tlon relative to the age limit at which 
it Is not advisable to have children in 
open Grange during the rendition ol 
degree and secret work. In reply I 
h^re to advise that this Is a matter 
for determination largely by the Maa* 
ter and the parents of the children. I« 
is not contemplated that children 
shall stay in open Grange after Oiey 
have arrived at an age when they are 
both a;ble and disposed to make public 
the ceremonial work of our order.' 
Some children attain this developmenit 
at an earlier age than others so tiiat 
no hard and fast rule ca;n be ' lal^ 
down as to age. Whenever it be^ 
comes apparent that a child Is in- 



clined to repeat or to talk about this 
work to others then the parents 
«houId of their own accord relieve the 
Worthy Master from embarrassment 
by making other provision for the en- 
tertainment of the child during that 
time. It is largely to meet Just such 
Bituations as this that the Juvenile 
Grange has come into existence. There 
are already several op- them in Penn- 
fiylvania and I commend this Juvenile 
Grange to all Granges that have a 
Bufflcient number of children among 
their membership and are able to 
make provision for a satisfactory 
meeting place for the little folk* 



[ Receiving on Demit CJard. 

You inquire as to the manner of 
receiving demitted members into 
membership in a Subordinate Grange. 

In reply I have to say that the ap- 
plicant should fill out the regular ap- 
plication blank, having crossed ofC the 
line, "I have not previously applied 
for membership, etc." He should at- 
tac!h to this his demit card and hand 
them together with the fee to some 
member of the Grange to preeent for 
him. It is within the province of the 
Grange to fix by resolution the fee 
to be charged for receiving members 
on demit card. This may range any- 
twhere from nothing to one dollar. 
"This Is to be determined by each 
•Orange for itself. A demit card re- 
mains in force for a period of six 
months and should be^presented with- 
in that time from the date of taking 
it out. When this application has 
been presented to the Grange the us- 
ual investigation committe should 
"S>e appointed. The application is then 
to lie over until the next regfular 
meeting when it is to be balloted on, 
a majority vote being required for a 
-^ejection in this instance. A majority 
^vote is also required for a rejection 
'in the case of a re-Instatement appll- 
• cation. 



^Worthy Secretary and Bro: — 

In reply to your enquiries, I have to 

'-advise that by action of the National 

«C(^^tange a couple of years ago a per- 

«(on is not entitled to the pecuniary 

benefits of ro.embershlp until after he 



has taken the four lower degrees of 
our order. This is a change from our 
former custom of giving them insur- 
ance and other pecuniary benefits as 
soon as they had received the first 
and second degrees. You also in- 
quired as to when the dues' are 
chargeable against a new member 
and in reply I have to advise that a 
new member becomes subject to dues 
at the commencement of the next 
month following the one in which he 
received the fourth degree. To illus- 
trate: Suppose a member takes the 
first and second degrees in January 
and the third and fourth in February. 
Your charge against him for dues 
would commence with the first of 
March and be only for the month of 
March. No portion of that is to be 
sent to the State Grange, however, as 
a proportion of his initiatory fee is 
sent. This, for a man with an initia- 
tory fee of three dollars, is one dollar 
In the case of a woman the initiatory 
fee is one dollar and you would send 
fifty cents with your report to the 
State secretary. In the case of a girl 
from fourteen to twenty-one years of 
age you would remit twenty-five cents 
of her fifty cents initiatory fee. The 
fee for a boy from fourteen to twenty- 
one years of age is one dollar, and 
fifty cents of this is to be sent to the 
State Grange secretary. Eligible 
minors between the ages of fourteen 
and twenty-one years are entitled to 
these fees without regard to whether 
their parents hold membership in our 
order. 



Special Kepresentative on Banking 

Chambersburg, Pa. Jan. 15, 1906. 
John G. McHenry, Benton, Pa. 

Dear Bro. McHenry; — 

For some time I have felt that 
the matter of developing banking In- 
terests under State Grange initiative 
should have at its head a parton ex- 
perienced in financial matters with 
good powers for organization who 
would give to the important subject 
sufficient Intelligent attention to avoid 
any mistakes in any county in which 
the movement might be inaugurated. 
In harmony with this Idea and with 



8 



the sanction of the Executive Com- 
mittee, it affords me pleasure to com- 
mission you as the special represen- 
tative of the Penn'a. State Grang'e on 
banking interests. I sincerely hope 
it will be agreeable to you to accept 
this trust and to enter upon the work 
with such plans and energy as will 
insure success to the movement with 
which your name is alr'^^ady irsep- 
arably associated. 

Let me suggest to you that you keep 
an itemized account of the expenses 
you incur as they relate to each par- 
ticular section to which you dire-ct 
your energies. The State Grange will 
then re-imburse you, although it is 
my thought that whenever a bank is 
organized it should bear the quota of 
expenses properly chargeable to it. 
I have no suggestions to make for,, 
although I am extremely anxious that 
each bank established shall be a suc- 
cess and be so constituted as to serve 
to the largest possible extent the Pa- 
trons of the country along every line 
consistent with safe banking, and al- 
though 1 am very solicitous that 
safety and integrity shall be the car- 
dinal principles around which to 
build, yet I am convinced that your 
hig'h sense of honor, keen judgment, 
marked ability and pride in the move- 
ment will result in your utilizing every 
possible safeguard for the protection 
of the many mutual interests con- 
cerned. Please feel furthermore that 
it is my earnest desire to assist you 
personally and officially in this large 
work and that I shall be glad to ren- 
der you such assistance as you may 
ask for, whenever it is in my power. 
Very fraternally yours, 
W. F. HILL, 
Master of State Grange. 



Benton, Pa,, Jan. 19, 1906. 
Mr. W. F. Hill, Chambersburg, Pa. 

Dear Worthy Master: — 

I beg to acknowledge receipt of 
your communication of the 15th inst. 
appointing me as a special represen- 
tative of the Pennsylvania State 
Grange on banking interests. I ap- 
preciate the honor which the appoint- 
ment is intended to convey and assure 



you that in accepting the commission 
I do so with the fullest realization of 
its importance and its responsibilities. 

Inasmuch as the work is new, I be- 
lieve that no candid man would be 
willing to acknowledge his fitness for 
the position. I can only promise you 
my best endeavor for the honorable 
and successful fulfillment of the po- 
sition with the highest degree of ear- 
nestness and intelligence which I can 
possibly put into the work. 

I shall at all times want your ad- 
vice, your co-operation and support 
and with our combined efforts I be- 
lieve that within a year we may be 
able to demonstrate the power ana 
strength of the Grange organization. 

I thank you for the honor of the ap- 
pointment and accept it in the true 
spirit of a duty which Shall be faith- 
fully performed to the best of my 
limited ability. Faithfully yours, 
JOHN G. MoHBNRY. 



~-Ellisburg, Pa., Dec. 18th, 1905. 

W. F. Hill, Worthy Master and Bro : 
Would you approve of the opening 
of the Pomona Grange representation 
question in the Grange News in this 
way. Have two signed articles, one 
setting forth the reasons why Po- 
mona Granges should have represen- 
tation, and one setting forth why they 
should not. published in the same is- 
sue of the News. Then request 
that each subordinate Grange make 
Pomona representation in State 
Grange a special order for one meet- 
ing. Have the articles in the Penn'a. 

Grange News read, the matter thor- 
oughly, discussed and a vote taken 

on the question, so the sentiment of 

the rank and file might be arrived at. 

Fraternally, 

H. H. HALL, Potter Co. 

First rate suggestion, Bro. Hall. 
Each Subordinate Grange then when 
reporting to Pomona can include 
"For or against Pomona Representa- 
tion in the State Grange," with its re- 
port. A discussion can follow in tlie 
Pomonas and If the sec'y or lecturer 
of each Pomona will send to Orange 
News the result of the vote together 



with the principal points made on 
each side they will be published. 

This subject attracted a good deal 
of interest at Sunbury and in the col- 
umns of Grange News is a good place 
to discuss it as well as all other ques- 
tions that interest Granges. 

Let us have your articles. Remem- 
ber to write on one side of the paper 
only. Put matter not intended for 
publication on a separate sheet. Sign 
your name, postoffice, number of 
Grange and county. Do not hesitate 
to write for fear of grammar or spell- 
ing. "We will fix those both all right. 
Give us ideas. 



Penn'a Grange News appears this 
month under a new postoffice fran- 
chise and it will now carry a limited 

amount of legitimate advertising. 



The rates appear elsewhere and 
apply to all alike. 

We will be glad to insert notices 
of "Eggs for Hatching," "Poultry," 
"Farm for sale," etc., etc.. at these 
rates. Send your natice to Penn'a. 
Grange News and we will tell you the 
charge. 

Salem Grange, in Clearfield County, 
as well as that Pomona Grange have 
passed a resolution extending an in- 
vitation to the State Grange to hold 
its next annual session at Du Bois, in 
their county. It is also represented 
that the business men of the town are 
much in favor of having the session 
held there. The Executive Committee 
of the State Grange will give careful 
consideration to this request when 
they get to determining the location 
of the next meeting. Williamsport 
and Oil City are also being considered. 



^xtcittive ^ammittee ^e^Hrtmetjt 

G. W. OSTER, Editor. 



Secretary please read in open 
Grange. 



TO the Patrons of Pennsylva- 
nia: Many of you are no 
doubt aware that Worthy 
Master Hill appointed a 
co-operative committee of 
four members for the purpose of 
keeping in close touch with our busi- 
ness houses, and especially to go to 
New York to examine into and inves- 
tigate our Mail Order house of Lubin 
& Co. 

We found them giving good values 
for the money and doing a square, 
honorable business. Our report has 
been printed in full in Lubin & Co.'s 
bulletin sent out about January Ist to 
the 20,000 Grange families in Penn- 
sylvania, 

You will find our report full of in- 
teresting facts In detail, and for the 
general information contained therein 
it should be read by every member of 
the order. There are some 70 Sub- 
ordinate Granges, however, that have 



not yet complied with Worthy Master 
Hill's request for a list of heads of 
Grange families, although they have 
been written twice on the subject. I 
hope you will see to it that these lists 
are forthcoming at once. 

Free Trip to New York. 

It will be remembered that Lubin- 
& Co. offered a free trip to New York 
to the ten secretaries in the State who 
purchased the largest amount of 
goods per member up to Feb. 1st. 
1906. The Co-operative Committee 
has had this matter under considera- 
tion, and we find that the rules gov- 
erning this contest need some revising 
and modifying so that no one may be 
done an injustice in the matter. 

First. The contest was to have 
closed Feb. 1st, 1906. At our sugges- 
tion Lubin & Co. have agreed to con- 
tinue the contest until Dec. 31st, 1906, 
when it will close for sure. The reai- 
sons for this change are these: Some 
of the secretaries of 1905 will not be 
their own sucessors in 1906. Their 



i 



places will be filled by some one else. 
So this contest opened Nov. 1, 1905, 
and would have been closed Feb. 1st, 
1906, under the first announcement. 
Now, in case of a change of secretary 
which one would have the right to go 
to New York ? Would it be the old 
or new secretary ? 

Again, sotae Granges have a pur- 
chasing agent and the secretaries pay 
no attention to the ordering of goods 
from any of our business houses. In 
this case the purchasing agent really 
should have the first chance to go. 
Mr. Lubin did not know anything 
about the change of officers that will 
occur during this contest, nor did he 
know of the purchasing agent. We 
have thought best that the ten 
Granges that win in this contest 
should each elect by ballot the repre- 
sentative who is to go to New York. 
Their choice would naturally be the 
purchasing agent, or the secretary, or 



the person who had in hand the mat- 
ter of ordering goods from Lubin & 
Co. This person should have first 
right or claim to go as he or she has 
done the bulk of the work in soliciting 
orders for the house and therefore 
should be rewarded for the efCorts put 
forth. 

I hope I have made this matter per- 
fectly plain and clear to all. Your 
committee felt under the circum- 
stances that our action was the only 
fair way out and in justice to all It 
really became necessary, as there was 
likely to he some disputes arising as 
to who had the first and best right to 
go. All misunderstandings and dis- 
putes will be avoided by continuing 
this contest for another year and hy 
having the ten winning Granges to 
elect their representative to go to New 
York. Fraternally, 

GEO. W. OSTER, 
For Co-operative Committee. 



\tdte ^ectur^i'B ^orneti 



While attending Pomona No. 5, Jan. 
5th, of special interest was our enter- 
tainment over night in the home of 
Bro. H. H. Brown, the secretary of 
Briar Creek Fire Insurance Company, 
and the opportunity of looking over 
the books and accounts of said Grange 
insurance company, from which these 
pleasing facts were taken: During 
1905 the losses were so light it was 
not necessary to make an assessment; 
during the year one million, nine 
hundred fourteen thousand six hun- 
dred dollars of insurance was written, 
making an aggregate of six million, 
seven hundred eighty-nine thousand 
one hundred fifty-nine dollars of in- 
surance, Jan. 1, 1906. The cost on 
one thousand dollars for thirty-one 
years has been fifty-six dollars, truly 
a good showing and an object lesson 
of what farmers can do by co-opera- 
tion. 

Lecturers that have prepared pro- 
grams six months or a year in ad- 
vance, having them printed and dis- 
tributed among the members, report 



good results from same. If your 
Grange has never tried this, I would 
suggest the matter be taken up and 
an effort made to arrange such a pro- 
gram. It is easier for a lecturer to 
prepare a program for the year than 
to prepare a part of it twelve times 
during the year, and then members 
will have seasonable notice of the 
part assigned them. After the pro- 
gram has been printed it will still be 
necessai-y to notify and encourage 
those who are to participate as the 
time arrives for the part assigned 
them and unavoidable failures will 
need to be provided for. 

With reference to this the last Na- 
tional Lecturer said in his report at 
the Atlantic City meeting: 

"The important matter in this work 
is causing members to participate In 
it, for exercises of this character ate 
more for the benefit of those partici- 
pating than those listening to them. 

"It requires nice discrimination and 
good judgment on the part of a lec- 
turer to assigrn such exercises to In- 
dividual members ais will cause them 



6 



to make mental exertion and at the 
same time not be so difficult as to 
discourage them from attempting 
them. 

"The term lecturer in this case does 
not necessarily imply a talker, but a 
person who has the ability to get 
others to thinking and talking. 

"It often happens that the most 
capable lecturer is unable to speak 
fluently, but has the faculty of inter- 
esting others in the literary exercises 
under his or her charge." 



Suggesttve Questions for Considera- 
tion. 

Is our Grange doing its degree work 
In as perfect manner ^ It should ? 

Have the railroads of our vicinity 
abolished all free transportation of 
passengers other than employees ? 

What is the best system of warming 
the farm house, stoves, hot air, hot 
water or steam ? 

Is a tank heater- practical for warm- 
ing the water for stock ? 



, RIPi*LES. 

Talk less and do more. 

Painting things red never causes 
the blues. 

The delightful conversationalist Is 
one who makes a long story short. 

Pleasure is in the pursuit of happi- 
ness, not in catching it. 

Darkness Is a bad companion. Light 
Is a cheerful friend. 

There is no regret over things we 
don't say. 

Too many self-made men never get 
themselves finished. 

Truth Is what you think about peo- 
ple and never tell them. 

Heaven is not reached by walking 
over a Brother. 

He who thinks himself the happiest, 
Is the happiest. He who thinks him- 
self the wisest, is a fool. 

If half the people were half they 
think they are, the top would not be 
half so roomy. 



What Subjects Would Interest the 
Lady Members of our Grange ? 

There are so many subjects that 
would be interesting and instructive, 
and so many minds to please, I think 
that It would not be possible for any 
one mind to decide what topic would 
prove of interest to our lady members. 
As we wish to have our discussions 
pleasing to all, I would suggest a va- 
riety of subjects, for what would be 
pleasing to one mind, might not be of 
interest to another. Of the few topics 
I have thought would prove of inter- 
est, I will first name, home-keeping, 
housekeeping, cooking, music, litera- 
ture, history, the last three named 
would be of interest to our young peo- 
ple. A few niinute's study of music, 
short discussions from the history of 
the lives of noted men and women 
who have lived before us, a sketch or 
a poem from a favorite author, would 
interest all, and when our young peo- 
ple find that we have something inter- 
esting, they too will come Into our 
Grange. For bees will flock where 
the honey is. Housekeeping and cook- 
ing, too, should have their small cor- 
ner in our discussions. These topics 
perhaps would seem of little interest 
to the gentlemen. I don't know why 
they should, for they all like a well 
kept home and all particularly like 
good cooking. 

I think we should not only discuss 
these topics but Instruct In these arts, 
then if the ladies should wish to take 
a day of recreation, the domestic ma- 
chinery would move along without 
friction. Perhaps you will think I 
will next name embroidery and fash- 
ions, but instead of these I will men- 
tion the Russian and Japanese ques- 
tion, for It seems these matters are 
quite unsettled. A few days ago I 
heard it remarked that these foreign 
topics were of little interest to our 
American citizen. Perhaps 'a discus- 
sion on these topics might lead to 
deeper thinking. A few days ago some 
friends were visiting us, and the pure 
food subject was brought up, and as 
we were not all of one mind, the dis- 
cussion became quite spirited. It was 
claimed that the Pure Food Law is 
governed by politicians. They claim 



It is just what the farmers voted for 
and its just what they need. Now, 
I don't think that the clause where it 
refers to dairy butter Is just what they 
need, I don't know just how we got 
it. but we have it now so refined that 
the farmers can no longer color their 
own butter. Perhaps by discussion 
we may find a remedy. I would sug- 
gest this remedy, that this winter we 
would make up some packages of 
butter, some of the real pale kind 
and send one to our representative 
and Governor and label it, 

"The nearest approach to gilt- 
edged b itter that the law now al- 
lows." ^ 

A few days ago I met a lady 
on the street, a farmer's wife, and I 
asked her if she would like to join our 
Grange. I mentioned that our discus- 
sions were quite interesting. She re- 
plied that we didn't discuss anything 
but stock, stock foods, and farming, 
and she wasn't interested in that, and 
she was a farmer's wife. I felt like 
exclaiming with Samantha Allen, the 
poor dear man married to a wife and 
she not interested in his work. What 
ever topics that our gentlemen mem- 
bers should wish to discuss, should 
prove of interest to the ladies. All 
matters relating to county and State, 
bills, recommendations, and all mat- 
ters that are for the voters' considera- 
tion. Now, we ladies can't vote, but 
by thoroughly understanding these 
matters we might be able to help our 
voters to vote. I don't think it would 
be wise to discuss politics to any great 
extent, for I know that there is no 
topic that creates such a difference 
among men as to disagree on politics, 
but a friendly discussion leads to a 
better knowledge, and when we send 
representatives we should know what 
they represent and when a political 
ax in the form of a bill or a recom- 
mendation, we whould better know 
when to help sharpen it. I think that 
as our Grangers are most all farmers, 
farm'ers' wives, daughters and sons, 
perhaps it would be well to have the 
larger part of our discussions on 
something pertaining to agriculture, 
for it is by this occupation that we 
gain our livelihood, and every branch 



of agriculture should be discussed, 
and men and women should stand isid* 
by side in these discussions, for it la 
by these discussions that our Grange 
women may gain the rudiments of 
an agricultural education if she un- 
derstands this work In the case of an 
emergency she can intelligently go on 
with the home work. She need not 
necessarily do this work, but be able 
to intelligently direct it. I know that 
it has been claimed that such occu- 
pations are unrefining. That sewing, 
music and art are the proper voca- 
tions for women. But that is an age 
that Is past. They are beautiful in 
their place, but the openings in theise 
arts are already overcrowded, and 
farmers' wives are not educated to 
excel or even compete in these artat 
and she needs to have a knowledge of 
some one thing whereby she may gain 
an independent livelihood. It is not 
what we say, but how we say it; It 
is not what we do, but how we do, 
that leaves impression on our char- 
acters. I do not claim that by these 
Grange discusisons we can be educat- 
ed to a high standard on these topics, 
but we can obtain the rudiments by 
the educational work that is going on 
in our Granges. I have not aimed to 
theorize, but to suggest a few plain 
practical thoughts for our Grange dis- 
cussions. Mrs. ETTA SCUDDER, 

Warren County. 



Tioga Pomona Meeting. 

The March Meeting of Pomona 
Grange, No. 30, Tioga County, will be 
held at Wellsboro, March 8th and 9th, 
1906, at which time your Subordinate 
Grange Legislative Committee should 
present any resolution for Legislation 
that your Grange may wish to have 
endorsed by Pomona for presentation 
to the Legislative Committee of the 
State Grange. Invitations for the 
June meeting will be received at this 
session. It is important that your 
Grange should be represented in this 
meeting, and the Worthy Master 
should endeavor to appoint delegates 
who will attend. Please return your 
report on or before March 5th, 1908. 
W. H, WHITING, Secretary. 



^egtBhtue ^an(mittee ^e^Hvtment 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 



Our Line of Battle. 

This year presents better opportu- 
nities to secure the reforms advocated 
by the Grange, than ever before. 

In order to make a winning flght 
plans and preparations must be made 
and the whole Grange order must 
march as one solid Phalanx to cai*ry 
out the plans and see that men shall 
be elected to our law making bodies 
that have the v\elfar,e.of the peoples 
in mind. 

There is a wave of reform sweeping 
over this country that demands better 
legislation — demands that honesty 
Justice shall rule in the place of graft 
and corporate greed. The Grange 
for years has been advocating reforms 
that were just and right but received 
little attention because all powerful 
bosses ruled Legislatures Governors, 
and courts with an iron hand. People 
now see the results— graft. Nearly 
every department of Government is 
more or less given over to the idea 
that Government is an institution to 
be used for the benefit of those who 
can get something for nothing and so 
we find that great fortunes have been 
built up by systematic robbery, appar- 
ently sanctioned by law. Special priv- 
ileges granted, special favors shown, 
all at the expense of the producers of 
wealth, why should our opportunities 
be limited or one class of citizens 
robbed to benefit another class ? For 
example, farm property taxed five 
times as much as corporate property. 
Railroad rates fixed by a few capital- 
ists not for the amount of service ren- 
dered but levied as much as the 
traffic will bear. Xo competition al- 
lowed by allowing trolleys to carry 
freight. Prices of coal increased, not 
to benefit the miners but to pay divi- 
dends on watered stocks and build up 
vast fortunes for a few who are con- 
stituted th special guardians of Di- 
vine Providence. Taxes increased, 
mot for the benefit of those governed 



but for the sake of piling up surplus 
for crooked politicians to use. 

The Legislative Committee has out- 
lined a plan which is non-partisan 
and requires every one in the organi- 
zation to fight for it if we are to win. 

Every candidate from Governor 
down should answer the following 
questions: 

1. Will you, if elected, assist the 
railroads in carrying out their "no 
pass order" by neither asking nor ac- 
cepting any favors from them ? 

2. Will you use your influence and 
vote to permit trolley roads to carry 
freig-ht ? . 

3. Will you favor a revision of the 
tax laws so that all kinds of proper- 
ties and franchise shall pay the same 
millage on the dollar of valuation, or 
what is still better, will you favor a 
graduated income tax ? 

4. Are you in favor of limited 
franchsises ? 

5. Will you favor a reduction of the 
State's surplus by having all license 
fees retained in the counties ? 

6. Will you favor equality of rates 
charged by transportation companies, 
both freight and passenger ? 

7. Are you in favor of legislation 
that will give the people more power 
to decide some of the more important 
questions, such as the granting of 
franchises, municipal ownership of 
public service corporations, and mat- 
ters of a purely local character ? 

8. Will you ^avor increasing the 
State aid in the Township Road Law 
from fifteen to fifty per cent, as It is 
now in New York State ? 

United action everlastingly kept up 
will win these reforms. The assist- 
ance of every one is required. Pass 
the word along the line. 

• Very fraternally, 

WM. T. CREASY, 
Sec. Leg. Com. Penn'a. State Grange. 



i 



; 



9. 



GRANGE HALL DEDICATION. 



: 




HE following condensed re- 
port of tlie dedication of 
the fine new Hall for 
Grange NO. 1296 of Brie 
County, is gleaned from, 
the Erie Daily Times. That enter- 
prising journal had a staff correspond- 
ent on the ground and devoted one of 
its large pages to the report. The en- 
terprising farmers here built the hall 
first and then had their Grange or- 
ganized in it with 77 charter mem- 
bers. The only thing marring in any 
way the perfection of the dedication 
exercises, was the absence of the 
Deputy who organized the Grange. 
Bro. Thomas Hurst. 

He longed to attend but there was a 
Farmers' Institute being held that 
day at Fairview in the same county. 
There is no Grange there but Brother 
H. felt that there should be and so 
he went there to talk up a new 
Grange. Surely such devoted workers 
merit success. Bro. Hurst is achiev- 
ing it and Erie County is booming. 
While several addresses were made we 
find room for extracts from but three, 
but the entire occasion was ideal in all 
its appointments and exercises. 

Patrons who attended State Grange 
at Erie will remember Prof. Bayle as 
the Superintendent of Schools in Brie 
County and the able chairman of the 
Committee on Education in that State 
Grange session. 

Bro. Austin is a newly appointed 
Deputy and one of the promising 
Grange workers of Northwest Penn'a. 
"When all had assembled in the 
large auditorium and Mr. Hill had 
given advance instruction to thoSe 
who "were to assist in the dedication, 
the orchestra played a selection, the 
officers and the State Master marched 
into the room and executed a pretty 
floor drill without a break. The Im- 
pressive ceremonies pleased the large 
audience throughout. 

Never before in the history of 
Greene Township is is safe to say did 
so many people gather for a similar 
purpose as yesterday when the splen- 
did new Grange hall was dedicated to 
the uses of the patrons of hjisbandry. 



The exercises of the day were appro- 
propriate and in keeping with the im- 
portance of the occasion. The cere- 
monies of dedication were quite im- 
pressive and were carried out under 
the supervision and able direction of 
W. F. Hill, Worthy Master of the 
Penn'a. State Grange. Splendid ad- 
dresses were delivered by the Worthy 
Master, County Superintendent of 
Schools, S. B. Bayle, of Fairview » 
Prof. H. O. Sampson, of the Water- 
ford High School faculty, and others. 
By ten o'clock yesterday morning 
the spacious building was crowded 
with local grangers and their friends, 
members of the organization from al- 
most every section of the county and 
many from a distance. The hall of 
West Greene Grange No. 1296, was 
turned over to the members shortly 
before noon. 

The New BuildiBg. 

The building is an imposing struc- 
ture for a country place and does 
credit to the progress of the commun- 
ity. It is 30 X 60 feet in size and 
three stories high. The location is an 
ideal one. It is at the top of what Is 
commonly called the Wilkins' hill, 
on the west side of the main road and 
almost directly opposite the West 
Greene M. E. Church. 

All of the work, with the exception 
of the carpenter work, was performed 
by the members of the new grange 
gratis. The local expenses of the 
building, not considering the labor 
and material which was donated.is es- 
timated at nearly $2,000. 

The basement floor has been ar- 
ranged into a warm and convenient 
stable, where the horses are to be kept 
while the members are enjoying the 
sessions. The second floor is com- 
prised of a parlor, ante-rooms, a din- 
ing hall large enough to seat 200 
people comfortably and a fine kitchen 
well equipped with all the necessary 
utensils and apparatus. The ceilings 
and walls are finished in a pretty 
manner and the floors are equally 
fine. 

A winding stairway leads to the 



10 



thiia noor, where the sessions will be 
held. This is composed of the neces- 
sary ante-rooms and the hall proper. 
During the afternoon, by direction 
of the school directors In the town- 
ship the public schools closed so that 
the teachers and pupils might attend 
the exercises. 

The Dedication. 

The first remark made by Worthy 
Master Hill when he entered the new 
building was, "Well, this is simply 
great. You have done splendidly." 
Prof. Bayle, Prof. Sampson and the 
others were equally well impressed. 

Prof. Bayle's Address. 

Among other things the county su- 
perintendent said : 

"Patrons of Husbandry, I rejoice in 
the fact that I accepted your generous 
invitation to meet with you upon this 
dedicatory occasion. I deem it a 
great privilege to address you this af- 
ternoon and say that I rejoice with 
you as a member of the Grange in 
the thought that such a hall as this 
has been erected. It is a generous 
pride that abides in the heart of every 
true Patron of Husbandry. 

"What are the reasons for such a 
building as this ? It has been com- 
pleted and we witnessed the impres- ' 
sive and beautiful dedication cere- 
monies this morning. There is a 
building that is to go on and on with- 
in these walls — the building of char- 
acter. The husband will receive the 
lessons that will make him the better 
father, the better provider, the better 
farmer, the better man. The wife will 
come here and learn such lessons as 
will make her the better housekeepert 
and teach her how to care even more 
wisely for the children. From this 
room you sturdy husbandmen will go 
out better farmers. 

"This hall has been dedicated to 
the sturdy principles of the Grange. 
You will love home the more for 
meeting here. You will teach home to 
your sons and daughters. It will help 
to keep the old farm in the family. 
A great deal has been said lately con- 
cerning the rivalry of the country and 
the city. I do not wish to champion 
the cause of the one nor challenge the 



other. I do not wish to say anything 
unfair about either, and what I say 
now is far from casting any reflection 
on the people of the city if taken aa 
I mean you shall understand it. 

"I was riding into our beautiful 
county seat on a suburban trolley car 
one evening w'hen a peculiar thing 
happened. A certain politician, whom 
you must not place for a moment 
among those who are recogni25ed as 
splendid men — and there are many 
good politicians — stood at a corner 
waiting for the car. In some manner 
the motorman overlooked him and 
the car ran by the crossing before It 
stopped. The man ran and got on 
and then he subjected the conductor 
to a severe arraignment, to say noth- 
ing of insult. He cried out loudly: 
'You farmers, what do you mean^ 
coming into our town, running over 
our tracks and not stopping for us ? 
I'm a politician of the city of Erie.' 
God bless his poor, little, miserable 
heart. Our Gem City is full of men, 
but not of such little fellows as he. 
He has never learned that the country 
has made the city. What would he 
do but for the butter of Greene 
Township to spread his bread and for 
the grain and potatoes raised here and 
elsewhere ? By and by you will see 
that little fellow sneaking out of the 
back door of politics; he who dared 
to announce to the 'farmers' in such 
a way that he was a 'politician.' 

"The Grange is a bond that unites 
us as brothers. We get a better 
knowledge of nature, and without it^ 
it seems to me, there can be no real 
education. No really successful man 
nowadays seeks to avoid having peo- 
ple know that he Is from the country. 
You say that the work upon a farm 
is hard. It is. Work in whatever vo- 
cation of life is hard. But you have 
the advantage of a regular life. Tou 
have real, good, solid, honest living 
and plenty of sleep. 

"In Greene Township your veiry 
farm speaks out of prosperity. Your 
interest in this meeting shows what 
your character is. A merciful man 
is merciful to his beast. Down below 
you have provided for the dumb ani- 
mals. Beneath us is that splendid 



11 



dining room. He who would do good 
work must live good and you need 
no instruction along that line. I am 
glad that the school directors of the 
township closed the schools this after- 
noon that the teachers and pupils 
milght be with us here. In closing I 
want to say, God bless in every way 
this Grange of West Greene. I think 
of the words spoken in the dedication 
ceremony, faith, hope and charity. 
Faith.the kind that holds us up; hope» 
the sort that makes life brighter; 
charity, the best of all, each for the 
other." 

Prof. Sampson's Address. 

[Bro. Sampson is engaged In teach- 
ing Agriculture in the High School. 
He is an agricultural college gradu- 
ate. Why ought we not to have more 
such schools and teachers over 
Penn'a. ?] — ^Ed. 

"I was deeply impressed with the 
beautiful dedication ceremonies and 
particularly with the song, 'Boys Stay 
on the Farm.' My work at Waterford 
Is In the line of keeping boys on the 
farm. When I look around me and 
behold the sturdy manhood, the 
charming wives and the beautiful 
young ladies I am convinced that It 
Is a good place for boys. The best 
way to keep the boys on the farm is to 
teach them that farming is a good oc- 
cupation. One of the best ways to 
teach them Is through the Grange. 

"In the agricultural course of Wa- 
terford High School we are teaching 
boys that very thing. It is a new de- 
parture to teach this branch In the 
high schools of this section and I 
bring you word to-day that we have 
met with satisfactory success at Wa- 
terford. We believe that we have 
found one of the best ways to Im- 
press the boy with the idea of staying 
on the farm." 

Bro. Austin's Address. 

"This hall that you dedicate to-day 
means that you do not consider ma- 
terial prosperity the end aimed at 
by human endeavor, but rather the 
means by which we attain to those 
higher ideals of life held forth by the 
order of Patrons of Husbandry. It 



is said Americans put the dollar mark 
upon everything. How much does It 
cost; how is it going tP pay ? are the 
first questions It Is said, we Ameri- 
cans ask. I think our grand school 
system alone refutes this proposition, 
a country in which the property pays 
the taxes, where the rich man's prop- 
erty pays for the education of the 
poor man's children, where every boy 
and girl, no matter how poor, can re- 
ceive a good education. A country 
where the poor boys attain to the first 
position in preference to the rich 
man's sons. I tjiink this Grange Hall 
refutes the dollar proposition. The 
first principles of the Grange, are not 
to make money. We enter the Grange 
not for the dollars there is in it, but 
as our ritual says, to develop a higher 
and nobler manhood and womanhood 
among ourselves. While the business 
possibilities of the Grange are great 
and its social features transforming 
farm life, its most potent force Is it* 
ever increasing educational Influence. 
Plutarch says it is all right to go to 
another man's fire for a light, but not 
to tarry thereby, but rather kindle 
one of your own. A light of your own 
is something worth having, though it 
be only a candle. 

"I think every farmer will be better 
qualified as a citizen and voter by the 
discussion in their midst, in their 
Grange, of the problems that affect 
his condition 

"I have sometimes thought this a 
good comparison of the Grange. Down 
at Washington there is a culture sta- 
tion, where they cultivate clover bac- 
teria. This is sent to different parts 9i 
the United States, wherever clover 
growing is difficult. Where it is placed 
in the ground it there inoculates the 
surrounding soil, causing little nodules 
to appear on the clover roots, enabling 
them to go deep into the sub soil and 
bring up the elements of plant life 
and to gather from the atmosphere 
the costly and to the plant the life- 
giving amonia, thereby producing for 
itself a luxuriant growth and enrich- 
ing the soil upon which it lives. All 
over this country wherever there Is a 
Grange, there Is being cultivated the 
bacteria of study, the soil being inocu- 



12 



lated is the rich soil of the mind, cauis- 
ingr to appear on the clover roots of 
thought those , nodules that enable 
them to go down deep into present 
day problems and bring up the ele- 
ments of intelligent citizenship, and 
to gather from association those les- 
sons of helpfulness that will make 
more competent men and women, 
more able to promote bright and 
happy homes. It is more than thrice 
blessed. It is a blessing to its mem- 
bers, a blessing to the community in 
Which it exists and its lasting benefit 
only books of eternity will unfold. 

"Then we say build up the libraries, 
gather in the young people here. Have 
your reading- club, your debating so- 
ciety, here discuss the questions of 
the day, and here you will light a 
lamp of education, of literary culture 
and of good citizenship." 



A Grange Golden Wedding. 

"Worthy Master George Dale, of 
Centre County Pomona, and his es- 
timable wife have lately celebrated 
their fiftieth wedding anniversary. A 
large number of friends and relatives' 
assembled and expressed their pleas- 
ure at being able to attend such a 
gathering. Mr. Dale and his wife are 
charter members of Loganx Grange, 
No. 109, organized in 1874. He has 
been Master of the county Grange for 
ten years, and was re-elected in No- 
vember for the following two years. 
He is the father-in-law of our "Worthy 
State Flora." 

Grange News joins in congratula- 
tions. Brother Dale is an earnest and 
efficient Grange worker and evidently 
the Centre County Pomona is appre- 
ciating his valuable work for the or- 
der. May they both be spared many 
years and enjoy the confidence and 
good will of a large host of friends. 






, Nuggets from the State Secretary. 



"Righteousness exalteth a nation, 
but sin is a reproach to any people." 
"The wages of sin is death." The 
pages of history are strewn with the 
wrecks of nations that have paid the 
penalty. Will we take warning or 
shall we continue in the headlong 
plunge ? 

There are many encouraging oigns 
of an awakening public conscience. 
Unfortunately almost every day brings 
to light new evidence of the need of 
such awakening. It cannot be too 
deeply impressed nor too often re- 
peated that, in this country, we have 
just such laws and public servants as 
the majority of the people are satis- 
fied with. The average law maker fol- 
lows public sentiment. He does not 
create it. If the majority of the 
American people shall demand strict 
honesty and faithfulness in public 
service they will have it. Everyone, 
who has the good of the country at 
heart, will join in the demand. Not 
only the safety but the existence of 



our institutions is at stake. There can 
be but one outcome if men in high 
places continue to look at their posi- 
tions as mere opportuniti s for plun- 
der. It behooves the plain people, 
those who have no axes to grind and 
no pull at the public crib, to insist 
that every public servant who takes 
a dishonest dollar shall pay it back 
by hard labor behind the bars. If 
present laws are not farreaching 
enough to put him there, have others 
enacted that will meet the case. Pel- 
low farmer, you and I must help in 
this. Rather we must take the lead. 
We have everything to gain by so do- 
ing. The highest recompense will be 
the consciousness of doing right, help- 
ing to keep our nation in line with 
that righteousness that exalteth. A 
lower, but still a very desirable result 
will be pecuniary gain. The dishonest 
dollar taken by the public thief comes 
out of the hand of labor. What profit 
or satisfaction is it to us to know that 
a man with a $20,000 salary and a 



13 






i 



$60,000 steal Is basKingr In sunny Cal- 
ifornia while we are freezing our fin- 
gers working to pay the taxes ? 

We, of the Grange, are looking into 
these things and seeking to bring our 
influence to bear on the side of right. 
Will you do effective work in the 
same line, join us and unite your in- 
fluence with ours. 

It is gratifying indeed to be able 
to say that Grange work was never 
in better condition in Pennsylvania 
than it is at the present time. This 
is indicated not alone by the organi- 
zation of new Granges and the addi- 
tion of large classes of new members, 
but even more by promptness with 
with reports are sent in and the in- 
terest taken in the local Grange meet- 
ings. At no time in the last twenty 
years have there been so few Granges 
that have failed to send in lists of 
newly elected officers in time to have 
them appear in the register. On ac- 
count of this we we are able to get 
the copy for the book into the hands 
of the printer earlier than usual. 



Encouraging reports of Grange ac- 
tivity come from many quarters. At 
a recent meeting of Butler County Po- 
mona held with Mt. Chestnut Grange 
twenty-one members took the fifth 
degree. Mt, Chestnut Grange organ- 
ized a literary society and the mem- 
bers take great interest in it. 



A line from Bro. J. K. Womeldorf, 
Deputy of Jefferaon County,says, "The 



Granges in this section are in a pros- 
perous condition." 

Bro. G. E. Ayer, of New Albany, 
Bradford County, writes, "We are 
booming our Grange and shall con- 
tinue to do so. We now have a mem- 
bership of 140 against about 30 a 
year ago." In his report for the quar- 
ter ending Dec. 31, 1905, Bro. Ayer 
sent in the names of 75 initiates. 

Since the meeting of the State 
Grange in December, eight new 
Granges have been organized in Penn- 
sylvania, as follows: 

No. 1295, Ijacka wanna County, by 
A. P. Hobbs,with 13 charter members. 

No. 1296, Erie County, By Thos. 
Hurst, with 77 charter members. 

No. 1297, McKean County, by L. W. 
Howden, with 27 charter mem'bers. 

No. 1298, Chester County, by Geo. 
R. North, with 21 charter members. 

No. 1299, Delaware County, by Wm. 
T. Pyle, with 41 charter members. 

No. 1300, Bradford County, by N. 
D. Snyder and A. M. Cornell, with 51 
charter members. 

No. 1301, Lycoming County, by 
Frank Porter, with 15 charter mem- 
bers. 

No. 1302, Bradford County, by N. 
D. Snyder, with 110 charter members. 

The latter is the largest charter list 
ever sent in in this State. 

Two dormant Granges have been 
re-organized: No. 194, Bradford 
County, by A. T. Lilley, with 41 char- 
ter members; No. 1005, Wayne Coun- 
ty, by C. H. Williams, with 13 charter 
members. 



GOLDEN THOUGHTS. 

Rev. J. W. JOHNSON, Editor. 



Address all communications to the 
editor at Skinner's Eddy, Pa. 

Having been asked to assume the 
editorship of this page of Penn'a. 
Grange News, I do it with a Arm con- 
viction that it is a duty and therefore 
Is to be conscientiously done. 

It will Certainly be a pleasure to 



feel that each month I am speaking 
to our great army of Pennsylvania 
Patrons; yet the responsibility is 
great. 

I know that I shall have the kindly 
co-operation of all our membership 
and shall welcome any communica- 
tion which will help lift others above 



14 



the sordid and selflsh and lead to 
truer living. 

Be free to write me concerning any- 
subject which interests you and which 
you think will help others. Together 
we trust that we may make this page 
both helpful and interesting. 

"Whatsoever things are true, what- 
soever things are honest, whatsoever 
things are just, whatsoever things are 
pure, whatsoever things are of good 
report — think on these things," So 
wrote the great Apostle to the Gen- 
tiles. 

Denying mind room to all that sav- 
ors of a lie, not allowing ourselves to 
think unjustly or unkindly of our 
neighbors, banishing from our minds 
all that is impure, and refusing to lis- 
ten to the gossipy evil report; but 
thinking of those things that are good 
and kind and pure and true, our 
thoughts will be golden and golden 
thoughts will make golden lives. 

It is a well known psychologic law 
that the thought of a thing increases 
the thing. 

Allow yourself to think of your 
physical pains and you suffer the 
more intensely. 

Why does trouble make you pessi- 
mistic and petulant ? Because when 
the dark cloud of trouble lowers over 
you, you shut yourself up in the in- 
ner recesses of your being and, think- 
ing only of your trouble, you forget 
that the sun is still shining. 

What Is the cause of socialism and 
the spirit of anarchy which is every- 
where present ? The cause is found 
In social misery which causes men to 
brood over their own condition until, 
losing the power to think rationally, 
they becomes envious and are filled 
with hatred. 

Drive the dark clouds from your life 
by refusing to thinlc of the sordid and 
selfish and watching for or creating 
opportunities for speaking a kind 
word or doing a kindly deed. 

As evil in the mind Is sure to In- 
crease and manifest itself In the life, 
so with the good. 

Let your thoughts, then, be golden 
and your hands will do golden deeds, 
your lips will speak golden words and 



your lives will be golden and full of 

sunshine for you will be a blessing to 

others. 

* 4< »> 

POINTS. 
Stop and Think. 

Blessed are the joy makers. 

What you do must be done to-day. 
To-morrow is never present. 

No man has a right to do as lie 
pleases, unless he pleases to do right. 

The trouble with easy going people 
is they make it hard going for others. 

Dr. Johnson said, referring to Intox- 
icants, "I know how to Abstain, but I 
don't know how to be moderate." 

Some men get rich and fail; some 
fail and get rich; but none need fail 
to be rich in holy thoughts and kindly 
deeds. 

There are a great many promising 
people in the world. In factf they 
promise about four times more than 
they can fulfill. 

Never bear more than one Tcind of 
trouble at a time. Some people bear 
three kinds — all they have had; all 
they have now, and all they expect to 
have. 

Not waiting for greater opportuni- 
ties or for increased ability, let us 
take for our motto and pin It so se- 
curely upon the walls of memory that 
it will be with us all the time, these 
words, "I will do the best I can, where 
I am, with what I have." 

In pleasant contrast to the adage : 
"Give the devil an inch, and he'll take 
an ell," is the beautiful lines of the 
Persian poet, Hafiz: 
"Who comes to God an inch, through 

doubtings dim. 
In blazing light God will advance a 
mile to him." 



It will pay your Grange to have 
Penn'a Grange News sent to those 
outsiders you want to get Inside. 
Twenty-five cents from your treasury 
will soon be paid back In initiation 
fees and dues received. It is worth 
an honest trial. We'll do our part; 
you do yours. [Editor.] 



15 



Scattering Granules Concerning Granges. 



Bro. G., H. Small, Deputy in Jeffer- 
son County, has been on the wing in- 
stalling officers and inspecting 
Granges. He says fhat he finds Grange 
work on the boom there and that h& 
is about to start on an organizing 
campaign. 



Fishing Creek Grange, Potter Coun- 
ty, has about nine miles set with tele- 
phone poles ready for the wire. At 
an entertainment and oyster supper 
recently a neat sum was realized for 
the treasury. 



Do you receive the Experiment Sta- 
tion Bulletins ? If not, and you will 
send a postal to Experiment Station, 
State College, Pa., requesting them, 
they will be sent you free. 



A Susquehanna County Grange Cele- 
bration. 

It has been the custom of Shiloh 
Grange, No, 927, to give a free oyster 
dinner on New Year's Day. 

Our 6th annual dinner was held in 
Grange Hall. Over one hundred were 
present. After dinner the Lecturer's 
• program consisted of song by the 
choir; address of welcome by retiring 
Master; response by the Master-elect; 
song by Mary Larue; song by W. 
State Chaplain, Rev. J. W. Johnson 
(2); recitation by Amanda Divine; 
recitation by Carrie France; reading 
(selected) by Jennie Belles. Special 
mention should be made of the recita- 
tion (with gesture) Jay little Miss Hall, 
of only three summers. Two recita- 
tions by Theron Hall; also dulcimer 
music by Bro. Hall. M. L. BoUes 
gave a report of the State Grange 
meeting at Sunbury, Pa., followed by 
Rev. J. W. Johnson. Closed with song 
by choir. 

"We are looking forward to having 
Hon. A. C. Barrett, Overseer of the 
Penn'a. State Grange, to exemplify 
the unwritten work, after which he 
will install our ofl!lcers at open session. 
We expect State Chaplain Rev. J. W. 
Johnson to be present. 



Bro. Barrett is our representative 
for Susquehanna County in the State 
Lgislature, 



The oleomargarinists have intro- 
duced a bill in the House of Represen- 
tatives providing for a reduction of 
the tax on colored -oleomargarine 
from ten cen'ts to two cents a pound. 
The committee on agriculture will 
pro/bably see to it that that bill is 
never reported out. This country has 
rejected oleomargarine as a food. 
Those who know the grease will not 
eat it. Those who do not know it do 
not wish to have it palmed off on 
them, as butter at butter prices. The 
present law protects the consumers, 
and it must stand. 



Pomona Grange, No. 53, McKean 
County, held an interesting session in 
hall of Ceres Grange, Feb. 15, with 
about 150 present. Corryville gets the 
next session, April 4th. 

Bro. Mortimer Whitehead has been 
delivering a series of lectures in Brad- 
ford County. Penn'a. Grange News 
suggests to Pomonas that you can 
not do better than to get this general 
favorite into your district. He always 
scores for the Grange, 

Worthy Editor . Lawrence Grange, 
937, Tioga County, was visited Jan. 13 
by Deputy Dorsett and newly elected 
officers were installed, after which 
Grange served a free supper to about 
150 Grangers. Our Grange has jiist 
purchased dishes and kitchen utensils 
to the amount of $20. 

We will be one year old Feb. 11th 
and we celebrate our birthday Sat- 
urday evening, Feb. 10th with our 
annual feast. A MEMBER. 



You ;can look for a large report 
from juls next quarter. At our last 
regular meeting there were 71 names 
proposed for membersftiip. If these 
all pass muster it will make us a class 
of 97 to receive the third and fourth 
degrees. 

G. E. AYER, Sec. Gr. 205. 



16 



The following letter from Bro. Mor- 
timer Whitehead will l^e appreciated 
by his many Grange friends in Penn- 
sylvania: 

Feb. 16th, 1906. 
Dear Bro. Hill: 

Coming into Pennsylvania last 
week from the great four days' meet- 
ing of the New York State Grange, 
with all its enthusiasm and progressive 
work, 420 receiving the sixth degree. 
I have been going the rounds of a 
"series" of public and closed meetings, 
arranged by your truly Worthy Lec- 
turer, Bro. Cornell, here in Bradford 
County. I find everywhere the best 
of feeling and harmony prevailing- 
Without exception the Granges visit- 
ed are taking in new members, the 
county having added over eight hun- 
dred during the past year, with three 
new Granges this year, one with 110 
charter members, and several other 
new ones in sight. I wish all patrons 
everywhere could visit and see an 
ideal Grange in this county, viz : 
Columbia Grange, No. 83, the home 
Grange of Bro. Cornell, who, by the 
way, is held in the highest respect 
and esteem by his own people, verily 
a pro'phet with honor in his own coun- 
try. Columbia Grange now has 403 
members with 15 applications in 
hand. They own a large three-story 
hall, sTieds for their horses; the 
Grange room is nicely carpeted and 
furnished with full paraphernalia; the 
walls adorned with appropriate pic- 
tures, including the founders of the 
order and their older members. A 
large and well selected library, and in 
addition they are using the State 
Traveling libraries, are co-operating 
in business matters. They took the 
first prize State Grange banner last 
year for largest increase in new 
members — 239 — and the banner 
adorns the hall. They have a tele- 
phone in the Grange room so that the 
members are always in touch with 
their homes. They meet every week 
and have been doing so for 32 years. 
They have a Juvenile Grange. Of 
the 29 Granges in this county, nearly 
all own their own halls or are taking 
steps towards getting one. I am writ- 
ing this in the large 28 x 60 new 
two-story hall of North Dwell Grange, 
No. 1280 where District Pomona 
Grange No. 23 is holding its two days' 
meeting, and two busy days they have 
been. The resolutions adopted are 
full of progress; the action of the Na- 
tional and State Granges upon the 
several measures requiring legislative 
action were endorsed, as well as pos- 
itive action on leal matters. Last year 
T had many calls for lecture work in 
Penn'a. but could only fill them with 
a promise to come along sometime in 
the future. This year's work as al- 



ready mapped out gives more days to 
your great State, and aJl who wish a 
place on this 'series' plan of meetings, 
which brings the cost down to a very 
small amount should correspond with 
either yourself or Bro. A .M. Cornell, 
and I'll do the best I can. Pennsyl- 
vania is doing grand work, and that 
this progress may long continue and 
her Patrons grow in numbers is the 
sincere wish of 

Yours fraternally. 

MORTIMER WHITEHEAD. 



Beaver Run Grange, No. 813, Lu- 
zerne County, celebrated the 19th an- 
niversary of their Grange on January 
27. It was organized with 22 char- 
ter members, only two of which were 
present. 

The evening was pleasantly spent, 
in singing, recitations and conferring 
the Third and Fourth Degrees on one 
candidate followed by a feast. 



After a most searching investiga- 
tion, the Grange Co-operative Com- 
mittee, specially appointed by Worthy 
Master Hill, made a report on Decem- 
ber 21, 1905, decidedly favorable to 
the Grange Co-operative Mail Order 
House of Lubin & Company. 27 
WaWlker Street. New York City. 

A postal to the firm will bring you 
both the Committee Report and the 
Store's Bulletin. Mention Grange 
News. 

Should any person desire to com- 
municate with any members of the 
Grange Co-operative Committee, he 
may address the member who resides 
nearest to him. This Committee is 
permanent, and is intended to bring 
Patrons and our business houses into 
closer communication. 

MISS JOSEPHINE ROBERTS, 

West Chester, Chester Co., Pa. 

E. B. DORSETT. 

Wellsboro, Tioga Co., Pa. 

CHARLES A. SISK, 

Factoryville, Wyoming Co., Pa. 

GEORGE W. OSTER, 

Oste-rburg. Bedford Co., Pa. 



Granges Organized and Re-organized 
from Oct. 1, 1905 to Dec. 31, 1905. 

Organized — California, 1; Connecti- 
cut, 1; Illinois, 1; Kansas, 1; Maine, 
3; Maryland, 8; Massachusetts,' 3; 
Michigan, 11; New Jersey, 3; New 
York, 4; Ohio, 3; Oregon, 3; Penngyl- 
sylvania, 9. Total, 14. 

Re-organized — Illinois, 1; Kansas, 
1; Maine, 1; Ohio, 1; Oregon, 1; Penn- 
vania, 4; Vermont, 7; Washington, 1. 
Total, 54. 



17 



CONDITIONS AND HOW TO BETTER THEM 

In an Address deliverecf at a Grange Picnic, John G, McHenry 
of Columbia County, Reviews Problems and Suggests Remedies 



Reprinted by request. 










FEEL, highly complimented to 
be invited to address this 
body of intelligent men and 
women of the Columbia Coun- 
ty farms. 
There Is always a reason 
for a man's special likes and dislikes and 
sometimes those reasons are directly 
traceable to Incidents which carry him 
back to his boyhood days. One reason 
perhaps that causes me to feel so deeply 
the Farmers' Interests is due to the fact 
that I have served a full apprenticeship 
upon the farm. 

At the age of sixteen I was placed on 
my father's farm and made a full hand at 
all kinds of work until I was twenty years 
old. During this time, In my daily Inter- 
course with tne farmer and his family, I 
learned to know him as a class. I learned 
to know something of his trials and some- 
thing of his pleasures, of his disappoint- 
ments and of his hopes. And so deep was 
the impression made upon my young 
mind that it has not only never become 
eradicated; but with advancing years 
comes an increasing respect and love for 
the farmer folk; a deeper desire in my 
heart to do what little may ever be in my 
power to advance their interests or ele- 
vate their condition. 

I think upon festive and social occa- 
sions of this kind that in some respect 
speeches are out of place and keeping 
with the time, and bearing this in mind, 
I will be as brief as possible and confine 
my remarks to the young men and women 
of the farms in particular and discuss, 

THE OPPORTUNITIES OF THE AMER- 
ICAN FARMER. 

Ic is not my purpose to tell you farmers 
who have had far more experience than 
I have ever had, how to grow greater 
crops; but I do want to t^ll you what I 
think you can and shduld do to secure a 
greater Income from the crops which you 
do grow. 

To the man who is dissatisfied with hl» 
lot — always bemoaning his fate, always 
grumbling and finding fault with his fam- 
ily, never finding any good in anybody 
or anything — I have nothing to say, for 
his case is a hopeless one. But to the 
man and - woman who are striving with 
noble efforts to make the best of a hard 
situation, who believe there is some good 
In humanity, who are bravely looking for- 
ward with cheerful hopefulness to a 
brighter future, I hope to advance a few 
words of cheer and encouragement and 
most especially do I want to give some 



words of hope to the young men and 
women who by nature will soon be called 
to places of responsibility and truat upon 
the farm. 

Did you ever stop to think for a mo- 
ment, that the farmer Is the hub around 
which the American Wheel of Oommero* 
and Trade revolves ? Did It ever occur 
to you that If the Hub was removed or 
stopped that the wonderful fabric of thl* 
great Commercial Wheel would collapse 
absolutely ? Did you ever think of the- 
immense good you are to humanity ? 
That the balance of the Commercial" - 
World can stop or go on as it pleases and 
it is of little moment to you, so far as ' 
your living goes; but should your work 
of production cease; Imagine for a mo- 
ment the result of all the farmers In the 
country saying:' we have enough provis- 
ions and supplies on hand to feed and, 
clothe our families, so we won't raJacN 
any nuore grain for a year or two. Or 
what value, I ask you, would the wealth 
of Rockefeller avail against the tremen- 
dous' cry for bread that would go up. 
throughout the land. 

I would never want to see sucb a step^. 
taken, nor would I advise it even tlioughs.. 
your organization was complete through- 
out as I hope some day to see It; be- 
cause It would not provide the remedy 
for existing conditions. Your mission lix. 
Hfe Is to create and not destroy. 

The farmers' and laborers' Interests are . 
mutual. When I refer to laborers, I mean 
all classes of people who labor either 
with their hands or brains, because they- 
are joint producers and working in part- 
nership with you. 

When we carry our memory back to tih#. 
Colonial Period and remember that at 
that time the farmers and laborers were 
the real owners of all the wealth of thls- 
country; that the signers of the "Decla- 
ration of Independence" were all farmers,. 
thus demonstrating that you had the ♦on- 
trolling voice in your Government, and< 
compare those times with financial andl 
.political conditions as they exist to-day; 
when we find that now one-elglith of our 
population is owning seven- eighths of th# 
wealth of the country and Wall Street 
through Its various ramifications owning 
and controlling this Government, it would 
appear that there Is soraethlngr vitalljr 
wrong either with farming as an Industry,, 
or the farmers thems elves, or tlis ooadl^ 
tlons which surround the farms. 

Admitting this to be a fact, let w #•• 
if we cannot locate the cause and sunrest 
a feasible remedy for Immediate appllca<-. 
tlon. 



18 



THE REAL CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY. 

It is astonishing to me to hear of all 
this talk about Captains of Industry; wor- 
^hippingr at the shrine of "Gold," as idol- 
aters of old. Who are the Captains of In- 
•dustry and the real producers of wealth ? 
The echoing answer comes to me from 
the breasts of all honest men, "The Amer- 
ican Farmer !" 

It is the product of his toil that puts 
every wheel of every industry in motion. 
. It is the product of his labor that has 
-caused the American Continent to be in- 
'tertwined with the greatest network of 
fffailroads that any country in the world 
•^As ever witnessed. It is the product of 
■&is toil that keeps the mighty fleets of 
•commercial going craft upon our ocean 
-and like the law of life, the law and foun- 
dation of commerce begins and ends with 
'the farmer. 

When the world first began, man's 
^earliest struggle was for existence, for 
ills food to eat and his raiment to wear, 
■during all these years this same struggle 
•continues; not with the abatement which 
should com« with modern conditions, but 
"With a seemingly added fierceness and 
intensity which can only come from ab- 
siormal conditions. After all is said and 
'done, we are all working for k living and 
■ at the final end it is all we get and we 
ihave to go to the farmer to get it. When 
the last trumpet call is sounded, the 
Rockefellers, the Morgans, and the Car- 
«iegies with all their millions, can only 
isay like you and I, we have lived. 

But have they paid the farmer who fed 
'them a fair price ? If so, why is it that 
^o-day farming seems a greater struggle 
^han ever before and is the farmer him- 
self entirely free from blame for this con- 
■dition ? Let us hold up the glass and 
Uook not only rival conditions, but our 
Own situatin squarely in the face. 

Where does wealth, begin. Let us go 

back to the beginning and trace it. As 

time went on it was found necessary for 

r/»en to separate their labor into differ- 

« ant classes. That is, while some tilled 

>ih'e soil others made shoes, while others 

' weaved clothing, and still others devoted 

'. their time to becoming skillful in the 

-^ various crafts. For a time they all lived 

. OS one people and divided the results of 

their toil equally. The next financial 

^ step was exchange of commodities, for 

instance the man who made a pair of 

anoocasins or shoes would exchange them 

for so much wheat or com. Later on 

money wajs devised and a basis of values 

.fixed. 

^or some years after the establishment 

of a money value all men were upon an 

-■equal footing and before a man could re- 

tjeive a dollar he must first give its 

' equivalent in value either in labor or the 

y products of his labor. For a time the 

t farmer thrived and made more money 

\ than any other class, because in addition 

-to the labor of his own hands, the 

.^arth, the sun, and the rain were all 

fhandmaidens helping him in his work 

wrf production and because of this help 



it was but natural that he should create 
and contribute more of real value to the 
world in general than any other class of 
workmen, but for the past half-century 
not withstanding the fact that ne has 
broader acres, improved machinery, pro- 
dusing his crops at a less cost, a broader 
market, increased consumption keeping 
pace with increased production, still pro- 
ducing the greater shgtre of the wealth 
of this nation, yet his prosperity has not 
beeoi keeping pace with the prosperity 
along other lines. 

In fact he has not even been holding 
his own and if the values of farm land 
as compared with other properties are a 
fair basis of comparison, the farmer of 
the United States is neither going ahead 
nor standing still, but is steadily going 
backward in this great race for money. 
It is a common law of evolution that 
neither an individual, a corporation, a 
State, nor a nation can stand still. The 
natural law of progress is as fixed as 
the laws of gravity and drives us either 
forward or backward, according to our 
ambition, our energy and our abilities. 
Is the American farmer keeping up with 
the p-rocession, or is he falling behind, 
and why ? 

HOW FICTITIOUS VALUES ARE 
CREATED AND MAINTAINED. 

After the money came into use, the 
gambling instinct which seems inherent 
in all men to a greater or less degree 
sprang into being as though touched 
with a magic wand. Vast financial 
schemes that were previously impossible 
and unheard of blossomed over night into 
the full bloom of a mushroom growth. 
Each scheme having for its prime object 
the creation of fictitious and commercial 
values to exchange with the farmer and 
laborer for their real and honest values 
of wheat and labor. 

For the benefit of my younger hearers 
I will explain how fictitious values are 
created and maintained. 

The shoemaker says, I will build a 
factory to make your shoes, and he goes 
to his banker and lays his plans before 
him. The first question the banker asks 
is, "How much is there in it for me ?" 
The shoemaker needs fifty thousand dol- 
lars to build his plant; the banker says 
all right. I will advance you the money 
to build your plant upon these conditions, 
you will give me a first mortgage against 
the property of one hundred thousand 
dollars, we will call this mortgage a 
bond issue and I will take the bonds at 
fifty cents on the dollar. And as I must 
have something for my trouble, I will 
sell them to my friends and clients for 
one hundred cents on the dollar, thus 
the banker has in this one transaction 
and by this magical process converted 
fifty cents of actual value into a dollar 
of commercial value. But he Is not 
through yet, he says to the shoemaker 
another condition of this transaction is, 
you must issue shares of stock for twice 
the amount of your bond Issue or two 



huj 

hal 

the 
it 



prij 

is 
facl 

art| 
yoi 
noi 
up< 
hui 
thi^ 
divi 
hur 
thel 
the 
groj 
six" 
thoi 
Ii 



19 



hundred thousand dollars and I want one- 
half of that stock. Now you may ..ank 
that all this does not concern you, that 
it is a matter between the shoemaker and 
his banker. 

Never lose sight of this fundamental 
principal, that the consumer — the user — 
is the man who always pays the manu- 
facturing cost and the profit upon every 
article sold. Let us see how this affects 
you; the factory is built and started, 
now the. shoemaker must pay interest 
upon his bonded indebtedness of one 
hundred thousand dollars, in addition to 
this he must pay interest in the form of 
dividends upon his capital stock of two 
hundred thousand dollars, thus you see 
the wonderful creation of value, where 
the fifty thousand dollar investment has 
grown over night to a commercial value 
six times as great, or three hundred 
thousand dollars. 

In order to pay all these interest 
charges, officers* salaries, etc., it is nec- 
essary for the shoemaker to charge a 
greater price for his shoes. Thus, where 
a farmer or laboring man once paid $1.50 
for a pair of shoes under the old way and 
under the old law of honest exchange of 
values, he is now paying two and two 
and a half dollars for the same pair of 
shoes. 

THE FORMATION OF A TRUST. 

After a little while the dealers of 
this sort and the shoemaker finds 
the same game and competition In the 
sale of his shoes has not only reduced 
his price, but made it hard for him to 
control his old trade, so he says to his 
stockholders, let us buy up all the shoe- 
making plants in the country so that no 
one will sell shoes cheaper than we do. 
Yes, they say, that might be all right, but 
some other fellow will still go on building 
factories and will buy hides and make 
shoes and continue to give us the same 
trouble. All right, we have a plan to 
meet that condition, we will not only 
own and control all plants, but we will 
form a jkxiI to buy and control all the 
Rides and raw material from which shoes 
are made, so the great leather trust is 
finally born. 

THE CREATION OF A HIGH PRO- 
TECTIVE TARIFF. 

They found after its first creation that 
there was another contingency which 
they hadn't counted upon, that other 
countries were dressing hides and were 
willing to sell them to the American peo- 
ple for less than the Trust prices, so the 
Trust appeals to CJongress and it has one 
of the most seductive appeals in the 
world, and demands that a tax be Im- 
posed upon all Importation of hides. Thus 
we find all the machinery completed 
with the aid of our own Grovernmlht 
which we have created, to make a per- 
fect monopoly of an article that must he 
used by every man, woman and child. 
The farmer now finds that If he must 



buy a, pair of shoes, he must help pay 
the Interest on a lot of watered stock and 
bonds, he must pay the high salariea of 
these Trust officials who nearly all re- 
ceive greater salaries than the President 
of the United States, and where a pair 
of shoes once cost him $1.50, he now pays 
two and two and a half dollars for the 
same shoes. 

If he buys one pair of shoes a year he 
is paying one dollar to the Trust that 
should rightfully go into his own private 
bank account. If he buys ten pairs of 
shoes for his family, he Is being robbed of 
ten dollars which rightfully belong to 
his wife and children. 

The comparison which I have endeav- 
ored to briefly draw In reference to shoes 
applies to every article the farmer and 
mechanic buys, from the matches with 
which he lights his morning fire, to the 
reaper that harvests his wheat. 

Every housewife here knows that dur- 
ing the canning season of every year 
sugar is advanced from a half to a full 
cent per pound. This seems a trifling 
matter, but it means in the aggregate, 
millions of profit to the Sugar Trust, and 
enables them to pay an unlawful profit 
upon their fictitious stock. 

THE PURCHASING POWER OF THE 
FARMER'S DOLLAR INCREASING. 

So you see the dollar which you have 
received for your wheat is used to buy 
so many fictitious values, that its use- 
fulness to you and its real purchasing 
value to you is growing less each year 
and under the present order of things 
your capacity for increasing the number 
of doilars you receive is limited. 

Here we find the man who Is the real 
producer of wealth between two fires, 
in no instance is he permitted to name 
his own price, neither for that which he 
buys, nor for that which he sells. He 
is obliged by the force of necessity to ac- 
cept the price that the merchant and 
miller offers him for his produce and le 
compelled to pay the price demanded by 
the merchant and manufacturer for the 
goods he must buy. Thus we see under 
this monopolistic control, the farmer's 
earning capacity growing less under this 
inverse ratio of proportion. The Trust 
compels him to take a little Ifess for what 
he has to sell and keeps charging him a 
little more each year for what he must 
buy until they have reached the limit of 
hunman endurance. 

Therefore, I claim the deal is not a fair 
one; that the farmer who is the original 
and true distributor of wealth Is not get- 
ting his share; and as a house cannot 
rise above the height for which Its foun- 
dation has been designed, neither can 
the general prosperity of our people as 
a whole rise to Its greatest level until 
there Is a general re-adjustment of the 
foundation structure of values, and that 
foundation begins absolutely with the 
farmer and laborers of all classes and 
the dollars which they create. 



20 



WALL STREET. 

You are all of course familiar with the 
term Wall Street, and know what it 
stands for. It is nothing more or less 
than a great gambling Institution and is 
doing more to undermine the individual- 
ity of the American people, doing more 
to aid in the concentration of wealth in- 
to the hands of a few, robbing the many, 
than all other agencies .combined. • 

Young men; you who are now standing 
upon the threshold between youth and 
manhood, with an eager ambition to take 
up life's duties and with an earnestness 
that bespeaks a gentle mother's careful 
training, let me add a word of warning 
to her daily prayers — Never gamble In 
any form or manner. 

Of all the vices it is one of the worst 
and places you at once under the ban of 
suspicion. And you lose not only your 
money, but what is of vastly more im- 
portance to you, the confidence of your 
friends. 

Wall iStreet Is where the watered bonds 
and stocks of these wonderful Trust 
Organizations are exchanged for the peo- 
ple's money. Think of the irony of it, 
they first throttle all competition, crush 
the small manufacturer and dealer, and 
then not only make the people put up 
more of their hard earned money to buy 
their products, but actually get the 
money from the people to build and equip 
their plants. 

In this respect the banks and trust 
companies of the United States and the 
United States Government are to a great 
extent in this conspiracy against the 
common people, in the application of 
cunningly devised methods called 

MODERN FINANCE. 

In conversation with a prominent Wall 
Street operator he described the opera- 
tions of Wall Street to me in the follow- 
ing language. He says: "Throw a 
twenty dollar gold piece into the grutter 
and a hundred brokers will fight for it, 
one will get it; now what happens, at 
night you will find those ninety-nine 
brokers lying awake planning each to 
get the twenty dollars from the other 
and for himself." 

The American farmer is to-day stand- 
ing in the very center of this mad money- 
getting life and character-killing arena. 
Go into any broker's office and read the 
little tape that comes over the wire and 
see the grave concern that is expressed 
concerning the crop reports. Read the 
financial columns of the city papers and 
note the crop reports. What does this 
mean ? 

My friends, it means that you are the 
fellows with the twenty dollar gold pieces 
and that the hundreds of thousands of 
brokers and so-called financiers are, lay- 
ing awake nights planning schemes to 
get It away from you and your family. 
What does It mean ? Why it means that 
the figures representing the value of your 
crops are positively startling in their Im- 
mensity. 



Last year's corn crop alone was two 
and a half billion bushels, valued at forty 
cents per bushel, makes the wonderful 
value of a billion dollars. 

An annual total for all crops and pro- 
duce, including live stock, for the year 
1904, makes the astonishing total of be- 
tween three and four billions of dollars, 
and the reports from this year's harvest 
promise to exceed by large figures the 
general average for the past ten years. 

Can you not see what this enormous 
wealth means ? Can you not see why the 
whole world waits anxiously the final 
report of the last harvest field ? If the 
crops are good it means that the farmer 
has plenty and that he Immediately be- 
gins to spend his money; he keeps fac- 
tories and millions of employees busy 
supplying his wants. The miners are 
kept busy supplying the heat and fuel 
that this demand has created. If the 
crops are good it means that the horde 
of Wall Street gamblers have so much 
more to play on. 

It means that the Rockefellers can sell 
another hundred million dollars worth of 
oil. It means that the railroads of the 
Goulds and Vanderbilts are busy night 
and day carrying freight and showing 
enormous profits for their stockholders. 

It means that the mighty Steel Trust 
can keep their mills going and pay their 
hundreds of thousands of employees fair 
wages. But what if the crops are poor, 
or the price below a living profit to the 
farmer ? It follows as surely as the night 
follows the day, that when the farmer 
has no money, nobody else has any. And 
when the farmer is prosperous he sheds 
his prosperity throughout all humanity, 
and like the rays of the morning sun, it 
penetrates and carries its life giving 
warmth throughout all classes of society. 

If it is true that the farmers and la- 
borers are the real producers and the 
rightful and original owners of the real 
wealth of this country, and this fact 
seem undeniable, why then should they 
take second place anywhere for anybody. 

I tell you, men, it is your own fault If 
you do. After creating this dollar you 
should not be content with the first 
transaction, but should follow that dol- 
lar through its many changes and as it 
continues to grow and double and treble 
in value, you should get your share. Is 
It any wonder that your condition gets 
harder each year ? 

There was a time-whieh I have already 
described when every man In the United 
States worked with his hands for a liv- 
ing. Now we find hundreds of thousands 
of men trying to live with their 
brains. They have ceased to be real 
producers in a physical sense and have 
become drones in this great beehive of 
humanity. In this great clamor for a 
hiffher education we find thousands of 
owr brightest young men entering our 
colleges with the idea that they are go- 
ing to make an easy living without work. 
My young friends get all the education 
you can, but get It with the idea that It 






21 



Is going to fit you to do more work and 
that work more intelligently. Get a col- 
lege education If you can, but if this Is 
denied you, remember that some of our 
brightest statesmen and greatest finan- 
ciers never saw the inside of a college. 

I would rather see a boy or girl filled 
with common sense and no education as 
It is so called, than to see them crammed 
with education and no common sense. 
Idleness should be viewed as a crime 
against society. 

Each year we find the number of farm 
workers growing less and the number of 
people standing around to be fed grow- 
ing more, and as these numbers Increase 
In this inverse ratio, we find the non- 
producers less willing to pay the farmer 
a fair price for his Investment and labor. 
They seemingly say to him, we are forced 
to buy your wheat because we must live; 
but we will get this dollar which we 
have just paid you for your wheat away 
from you so quick that the little time 
you keep it does not interrupt our finan- 
cial plans. 

iSo after harvesting your crops and 
collecting this tremendous sum of money 
you turn right around and send it back 
to "Wall Street through the depositories 
of your local banks and say to them, take 
it, we are afraid to trust ourselves to 
handle it. But you say, how can this 
state of things be remedied. 

THE REMEDY. 

When we talk about a remedy for the 
farming industry, I am reminded of the 
story of the East India vessel upon which 
the bubonic plague or cholera had got 
started and men were dying In great 
numbers. The surgeons would make a 
chalk mark at the head of each bunk 
containing a corpse; in going his rounds 
he placed his mark on a bunk whose oc- 
cupant raised a grreat cry and said he 
wasn't dead yet, when the surgeon re- 
plied: "Shut up, you fool, do you sup- 
pose you know more about it than I do." 

So it is with the farmer, every time he 
raises his voice in protest and suggests 
a remedy, we hear the voice of Wall 
Street through the Government at Wash- 
ington, saying to us, "Shut up, we know 
what ails you better than you do." For 
years and yeafS we have been deluded 
with political promises. 

Each four years our flagging hopes are 
renewed with pledges and each time we 
are unfailingly disappointed. 

The Government says we will Investi- 
gate. So investigators are appointed who 
have a faculty of always finding a Su- 
preme Ck)urt decision or a Constitutional 
reason why the Trusts cannot be de- 
stroyed. 

Take for Instance the recent report of 
Garfield, who was appointed to investi- 
gate the Beef Trust. Tlnie does not per- 
mit me here to give you a statement of 
his figures, but the result of his report 
was, first, there was no Beef Trust, 
Second, that the large packing houses 
were hardly making expenses, and third, 



that the Beef Trust was accomplishing 
a real benefit to suffering humanity. 

He didn't tell us what is true, that the 
price of beef has advanced from sixteen 
cents for sirloin steak in 1900 to twenty- 
two per pound In 1905 In the average city 
market, and that a steer that was worth 
$46 in 1900, was worth $44, in 1902; $42, 
in 1903, and $41.50, in 1904. The actual 
figures show these results. As in the 
case of the shoe .manufacturer, the great 
combination of capital into what is com- 
monly called a Trust has enabled them 
to control absolutely the price of all raw 
material. Steadily forcing the price of 
raw material down and with correspond- 
ing certainty forcing the price of the 
finished article higher. 
..Thus we see in every transaction In 
which the farmer and laborer Is Interest- 
ed, a combination against him which It 
gradually lessening his earning capacity, 
by giving him less for what he has to sell 
and compelling him to pay more for what 
he Is obliged to buy. 

Why should we be longer deceived ? 
We need no longer look for hope or help 
from this Government until you learn to 
join hands in a movement which has for 
its purpose a Government of the people, 
for the people and by the people. 

The politicians of all parties know full^ 
well that the Constitution of the United 
States gives to the capitalist the the same 
privilege of spending his money as it ac- 
cords to you, and just so long as you are 
willing to rush into Wall Street and buy 
the watered stocks of these Trust Qfe- 
ations and pontinue to place your surplus 
earnings in the hands of insurance and 
trust companies for their use and manip- 
ulation, just so long will Trusts continue 
to thrive, regardless of any political party 
which may be in power, because the 
Government Is powerless to prevent them 
by any present or past methods of pr<3- 
cedure. 

The remedy, my friends, lies both with 
our Government and with ourselves. But 
before the common people can expect any 
help from their Government, they must 
win back the control which they once had 
in the days of Washington and Lincoln. 
As to ourselves, let us see if we are doing 
what we can individually before we con- 
demn either the Government or the man 
behind the Trusts. 

The time is here for all men wtoo toll to 
join hands for mutual protection. When 
any law or condition is created, that ben- 
efits the farmer; then the miner, the me- 
chanic, the laborer and aU humanity are 
correspondingly benefitted, for we are all 
of one brotherhood. 

Brotherhood. 
The crest and crowning of all" good. 
Life's final star, Is Brotherhood; 
For' It will bring again to earth 
Her long-lost Poesy and Mirth; 
Will send new light on every face, 
A kingly power upon the race. 
And till it come, we men are slaves, 
And travel downward to the dual of 
graves. 



^ 



22 



Come, clear the way, then, clear the way; 
Blind creeds and kings have had their day. 
BreaH th^ dead branches from the path; 
Our hope is in the aftermath — 
Our hope is in heroic men. 
Star-led to build the world again. 
To this Event the ages ran: 
Make way for Brotherhood — make way 
for Man. 

The first step towards the solution of 
this great proble mis Organization. The 
miners are organized into one great pow- 
erful organization. Winning for them- 
selves by reason of the strength of their 
organization fair wages and fair treat- 
ment. Likewise every trade and profes- 
sion — we see capital organized into the 
most wonderful combination of Trusts 
and series of Trusts wifh a self protec- 
tive alliance binding them all together; 
whose present aggregation of wealth con- 
trolled directly and indirectly is grreater 
than the United States Government. 

It is dictating the policies of our Gov- 
ernment, it is dictating the earning ca- 
pacity of our people and if not soon 
checked our boasted American freedom 
win have passed into history and in its 
place will be seventy millions of white 
slaves bowing to the will of this mighty 
money power. 

In the face of all this evidence which 
we see of the fruits of organization along 
other lines, yet we pause and hesitate — 
we find the farmers representing forty 
per cent, of the population of the United 
States, the real producers of all this 
wealth, the foundation and support of 
commerce, the original creators and sup- 
porters of this Government, standing 
with folded arms in a spirit of abject 
helplessness. Plodding along alone with 
practically no organization. 

HOW SHALL WE ORGANIZE ? 

In wtiat way and through what medi- 
um shall we get together ? "We all know 
that single handed and apart we are 
powerless to accomplish any results; but 
united as one man, for the common good 
of humanity, an organization of al work- 
ers can be effected that will make Wall 
Street look like thirty cents. 

Think of it ! A handful of a score of 
men, through the banks and trust com- 
panies of this country controlling abso- 
lutely the affairs of not only this Gov- 
ernment, but your destiny and my des- 
tiny, and this, too, w<hen you have it in 
your power to fight these foes of Gov- 
ernment and of individual liberty t6 a 
victorious finish. 

"Do you know of any good reason why 
any person should not become a member 
of the Grange ? To you men who have 
not joined, is it because you are afraid 
you will make your condition worse 7 
Are you afraid something will happen to 
you ? Let us arise in our might and take 
a hand in the fight between giants. Let 
us not be mindful of what the name of 



our vehicle may be, but choose the oldest 
and strongest and join hands to a man. 

THE ORDER O THE GRANGfe. 

The order of tlie Grange stands before 
the world with a record of high motives 
and the accomplishment of much good. 
It carries with it the ennobling infiuence 
of full membership to worfTen — God bless 
them. There never was in all the history 
of the world any really great achieve- 
ment, either national or individual, ac- 
complished without the aid of her love 
and help and the present and future suc- 
cess of the Grange is, and will be, large- 
ly due to the uplifting influence of the 
good women who are members. While It 
is yet In Its infancy It is forging ahead 
with rapid strides and my friend, It don't 
make any difference how many other or- 
ders of a like character you may belong 
to, by all means become a member of the 
Grange with out delay — organlzajtlon, con- 
solidation, is the watchword and the 
battle-cry to victory. Let us no longer 
stand idly by in futile fault finding, but 
let us get ready for the battle which is 
to come — not a battle of sword or musket, 
God forbid; but a battle glorious of bal- 
lots, a battle of brains and a battle of 
money. 

You have each of these factors in ma- 
jority numbers and the only thing you 
lack is concentration and organization. 
The time is not far distant when the 
control, the management, the domination 
of this Government and the making of 
our laws will be transferred from Wall 
Street to you — it lies with you to say 
how soon. 

Young man, I say to you, stick to the 
farm. The near future holds better and 
safer opportunities for you in this line 
than any other I know of. The time is 
near when your calling will be fully rec- 
ognized by all classes as the most honor- 
able and most lucrative of any. 

There Is just one way to win success^ 
work unceasingly, work intelligently, 
study your conditions to increase your 
producing capacity. Train your life and 
mind that you may be fitted for any po- 
sition of trust to which you may be called 
and above all else, my young friends, 
above money, power, education, brains. 
Is character, upon this depends the suc- 
cess and strength not only of 6ur nation, 
but your success individually. No man 
nor woman can win without it. 

Let us eliminate all petty strife and 
jealousies from our order,let us widen the 
scope of our work and extend a cordial 
Invitation to all tollers to join our ranks. 
With the farmers of the country, the 
miners, the mechanics, and the workers 
of all classes joined together into our 
great society, free from political pur- 
poses and beliefs, there wIU be such an 
array of forces presented upon tlie field 
of battle that the enemy will strike the 
flag of truce; but when that time comes 
there will be no truce, nothing but an un- 
conditional surrender. 



WHi 
W] 
PI 



23 



WHAT OUR GOVERNMENT WILL DO 
WHEN CONTROLLED BY THE PEO- 
PLE IN PLACE OF WALL STREET. 

We will say to this Government, we 
have created you and supported you, when 
you needed men and money to defend our 
country's flag you drew both from our 
ranks, we do not now ask for any 
special Legislation, we do not want any 
favors, all we ask is simple justice. And 
that we will have. 

We do not seek any monopoly, nor do 
we want to increase the cost of bread 
to those we feed, beyond a fair and hon- 
est value; but if you say that the combi- 
nation of capital in the manufacturing 
industries, for the purpose of impover- 
ishing us by forcing us to take less for 
what we have to sell and to pay more for 
what we must buy, cannoc be prevented 
we want you, the creature of Grovern- 
ment which we have created, to protect 
your people. We want you to say to 
these Trusts, go on with your trafl!ic, we 
will go into the Trust business ourselves. 
We will build a G-overnment shoeshop, for 
illustration, and restore the old price of 
hides and shoes by honest competition, 
pay fair wages for labor, and still make 
a profit for the Government into which 
everybody will share. 

Say to the sugar Trust, we will go into 
the sugar business and restore - 4o the 
farmers the profitable business of raising 
sugar beets, earn a profit on our Govern- 
cent a pound less than it is n^w being 
sold for, and save to the pocketS of the 
great American people millions of dollars 
annually. 

Say to the Standard Oil Trust, the 
Supreme Court says you are doing a le- 
gal business and we do not want to harm 
you, we do not intend to confiscate your 
property, because in the first place it 
would not be fair nor right to do so, and 
in the second place we do not want your 
property, but we are going to withdraw 
Government protection. We will first 
remove the tariff on imported oil — ^so 
that if Germany or Russia can sell us 
finished illuminating oil at five cents per 
gallon (w*hich is the standard seaboard 
price for both import afid export oil) we 
want every American family who uses 
oil to have the privilege of buying It at 
five cents per gallon in place of twelve 
and fourteen — as now charged by the 
-Standard Oil Trust. We will say still 
further to this mighty Trust, we are go- 
ing to divide your hundred millions of 
annual profit among the farmers of the 
United States. We will do like Germany, 
remove the internal revenue tax from al- 
cohol for manufacturing purposes only, 
such as light, heat and fuel, and let it 
become a natural competitor with oil In 
accordance with the laws of God and na- 
ture. Germany last years produced three 
hundred million gallons of alcohol for this 
purpose and sold It cheaper than coal oil. 
Think for a moment what this would 
mean to every man, woman and child In 
the United States. Every field and every 



garden containing a vegetable, a con^^ 
stalk, or a grass blade, would have an 
additional earning power because of the^ 
alcohol they contain.and this man Rocke- 
feller who now boasts that ihe has more 
money at his command than the United 
States Government, would have to 16olt 
for another job. 

THE HIGHER REALMS OF FINANCE. 

I might go on and enumerate a dozeib 
more articles of manufacture whereby 
the Government could restore honest com- 
petition; sell the product to the- publlo; 
for less money than they are now paying 
and still earn a net profit each year suf~ 
ficlent to pay off our national debt and-^ 
lower your taxes. From the manufactur- 
ing class let us turn to the higher realms 
of finance. Take the Equitable Life In« 
surance Company for the Illustration of 
a condition. 

The Equitable Life Insurance Company 
was founded about fifty years ago with a 
capital stock of one hundred thousand 
dollars, and to-day has assets to the value 
of four hundred millions of dollars. Think 
what a fabulous sum of money this Is 
and think of the possibilities for a Na- 
tional life insurance company, operated 
by and for the people of the United 
States through the agency of this Gov- 
ernment. If a little one-horse Individual 
company with a capital of one hundred 
thousand, can earn four hundred millions 
in fifty years, I ask you in all fairness^ 
is It not reasonable to believe that thft 
profits to the Government from a national 
irisurance company would be something 
fabulous. I venture this assertion with- 
out fear of successful contradiction, that 
a national insurance company would b& 
earning within three years enough money 
working along the same lines of the pres- 
ent insurance companies to pay one-half 
of the entire taxation of the United 
States and at practically no risk of loss 
to Government moneys. I believe that a 
farmers' and laborers' national life in- 
surance company in the. near future is 
possible. 

..And why should not some of thesft 
things be ? Why should our Government 
not be run In the interests of all people^ 
instead of a few ? Why should not this 
Government be a creator Instead of an 
absorber of our nation's vitality ? Why 
not be an earner instead of a spender of- 
money ? 

When we remember that our taxes are> 
levied merely to pay the running cost of* 
our Government, why should it not be at 
least self suppQrting through legitimate- 
commercial enterprises ? I would nott 
have our Government enter thd field of 
competition as against our smaller and 
diversified industries; nor should It go to 
the extent of suppressing Individual am- 
bition which has made this country com-^ 
merclally famous; but when we see all In- 
dividual ambition, all competition crush- 
ed by ruthless monopolies along certain 
lines. It Is then the duty of this Govern- 
ment to restore honest competition for 



24 



the benefit of all the people through the 
acrency of Its great influence, and power. 

To silence all unfair critlcisnos which 
will probably arise concerning these 
fltatements, I want to say to you publicly 
here and now, that I will be one of five 
publio spirited men to furnish bond to 
the United States Government in the sum 
of five hundred thousand dollars guaran- 
teeing this Government against loss in 
appropriating the sum of money or any 
sum necessary to establish a Government 
life insurance company — such a company 
under the management of an honest, 
fearless, able man like President Roose- 
velt would be an immediate and lasting 
success. 

The successful political party of the fu- 
ture must embrace municipal or Govern- 
ment ownership along conservative lines. 
We are not, in my judgment, ready yet 
to embrace the idea of the municipal 
ownership of railroads, and It will prob- 
ably be a long way off and is a problem 
to be approached with extreme caution. 
Sn trying to lessen our burden of debt 
end increase our individual income thru 
Oovernment help, by the restoration of 
honest competition, we do not want to 
make the mistake of plunging headlong 
In debt, buying a lot of watered stock and 
increasing the very burden of indebted- 
ness we seek to avoid. But the Govern- 
ment can approach the solution of this 
l>roblem along paths of absolute safety by 
beginning with a national Insurance com- 
pany and with these profits enlarge the 
ephere of national commercial activity 
along the lines I have briefly mentioned. 

THE PEOPLE OF WALL STREET. 

I believe, my friends, you all agree with 
me in this matter and also agree that it 
Is not a question of party or politics. It is 
a question of the people, or Wall Street. 
And the only way for you to help an- 
swer the question and accomplish the 
good work which is apparently before you 
Is for all classes of men and women who 
toil for their daily bread, to unite in one 
common brotHerhood. 

Ask yourself this question : If In fifty 
years one- eighth of the people can ac- 
quire and control seven-eights of all the 
wealth of the country, how long at this 
flame rate will it take them to get the 
remaining eighth ? It is a question 
-worthy of the most serious thought of 
■«very patriotic, home loving citizen. 

WHAT CAN WE DO OURSELVES. 

While we agree that the Government 
ean do a great deal to help us and that 
we must become nationally strong before 
we can expect such support, now let us 
see if there is not something we can do 
•ourselves, in the meantime. 

You all know the Biblical story of the 
"ten talents. Before ' you can oonscien- 
tlously ask this Government to help you 
or before you can rightfully condemn the 
Ci«eedy capitalists, you must first demon- 
■trate your own strength and your own 
willingness to help yourselves. My friends 



what are you doing with your talents ? 
What are you doing with this thing called 
money ? With this thing of man's cre- 
ation which of necessity has made every 
man's and womart's life a fierce battle 
from the cradle to the grave — the dollar ? 
Have you got It working for you intelli- 
gently, while you work *and while you 
sleep ? No ? Ah, here is the supreme 
fault of this whole problem. 

Single handed and alone you could not 
accomplish much in the commercial 
world, but unite your forces and you be- 
come the powerful factor you have a 
right to be. Men, why don't you get to- 
gether and grasp the opportunities which 
await you ? Why don't you create places 
in the business world for some of these 
bright, manly boys and young men x see 
before me, whose frank, oPen countenan- 
ces bear the stamp of honesty and clean 
manly character which the mothers of 
Columbia County, second to no mother- 
hood in the world, know how to giva 
their sons. 

I tell you, my friends, I am proud of 
my county and still prouder of her people, 
and with all the earnestness I possess, let 
me persuade you to rise In the strength 
and means whicn God has given you and 
act. 

In Columbia County there are 8,000 , 
farmers, mechanics, miners and laborers 
over twenty-one years old. Thus we see 
that 95 per cent, of our male population ^ 
are toilers and real producers of real 
wealth. The man who works as a day 
laborer is just as much a producer to the 
extent of his efforts as the farmer or 
manufacturrr. 

There are nine banks and one trust 
company in this county, carrying an ag- 
gregate line of deposits around $2,000,- 
000. Now this money belongs to the 
people. It is fair to say that 60 per 
cent belongs to the farmers and laborers. 
Here Is a point I want you to remember—, 
you have been content to create the dol- 
lar, now why don't you make that dollar 
earn something for you ? 

The individual actual cash balance, not 
including any property o fthe farmers and 
laborers of Columbia County, as nearly 
as I can estimate Is $1,200,000. 

In the State of Pennsylvania there is 
over four hundred million dollars of ac- 
tual cash, belonging to the farmers and 
laborers now lying In the vaults of our 
banks and trust companies, or enough 
money to buy the Pennsylvania Railroad, 
and if you owned the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, you would find that in some unac- 
countable way you had at the same time 
secured the ownership of the Pennsylva- 
nia Legislature, for they seem to be one 
and Inseparable. 

Think of the things you could accom- 
plish if you had this vast sum under 
scientific control in your own interests. 
It is all your money, and yet you will 
stand back and transfer this stewardship 
which has been entrusted to you to the 
keeping of other hands. In doing so, you 



are gu 
terests 
bers oj 
blood ] 
lished 
to the 
In raak 

OWN 



The i 

•clal ani 

and sir 

your o 

money. 

Supp( 

farmers 

would I 

and tri 

place f 

surplus 

posit a 

first ye 

bank s 

hundrec 

two ye 

fifty do] 

If I w 

horse f 

use him 

feed an 

• dollars 

two yea 

such ho 

the mor 

Now 
propertj 
County, 
farm la 
twenty- 
lid ten 
in our <1 
offered 
than th( 
is about 
don't w 
much h 
Wall St 
oommod 
values <. 
keeping 
says to 3 
we don' 
money 3 
through 
immedia 
Street ar 
labor an 
the fam' 
a good 
Ing you 

On the 
stock In 
for less 
from tha 
above pa 
splendid 
point. 

Now y( 
real own 
your de] 
National 
of the 



26 



are guilty of criminal neglect to the in- 
terests of your families and to the mem- 
bers of our Revolutionary fathers whose 
blood purchased our freedom and estab- 
lished a Government for all people. Amd 
to the trust that God has placed in you 
In making you the stewards of this earth. 

OWN AND CONTROL YOUR OWN 
Banks. 

The solution of this great political, so- 
cial and financial problem is just as easy 
a,nd simple as it is safe and sound — own 
your own banks and control your own 
money. 

Suppose, by way of illustration, the 
farmers and laborers of Columbia County 
would organize their own national bank 
and trust company. Making a central 
place for deposit, for your working and 
surplus money. You would have on de- 
posit a half million dollars within the 
first year of starting your bank. That 
bank stock which would cost you one 
hundred dollars per share would within 
two years be worth one hundred and 
fifty dollars per share. 

If I were to say to you, I will sell you a 
horse for one hundred dollars, you can 
use him two years and I will pay for his 
feed and give you one hundred and fifty 
•dollars for the same horse at the end of 
two years, you would want a carload of 
such horses right away and would borrow 
the money if necessary to buy them. 

Now compare the value of your farm 
property with the bank stock of Columbia 
County. I know, and so do you, that 
farm land is sellimg to-day for from 
twenty-five to forty per cent, less than it 
lid ten years ago. I know of instances 
in our own community where farms are 
offered to-day for sale for little more 
than the cost of the buildings. Farm land 
is about the only thing that Wall Street 
dom't want to buy, because it takes too 
much hard work to handle it, and as 
Wall Street regulates all prices of all 
commodities, it is plain to see why the 
values of farm land do not advance In 
keeping with other values. Wall Street 
eays to you, go ahead and work your land, 
we don't want it. All we want is the 
money you receive from your crops and 
through the present system of finance you 
immediately turn your crops over to Wall 
Street and while you sweat and groan and 
labor and complain in farming the land, 
the families of Wall Street are having 
a good time, making fortunes and farm- 
ing you while you farm the land. 

On the other hand, there It not a bank 
stock in the county that can be bought 
for less that fifty per cen|;. above par, and 
from that on up to two hundred per cent, 
above par and they are all showing this 
splendid value from a cash earning stand- 
point. 

Now you men and women should be the 
real owners of these banks, because it is 
Four deposit money that makes every 
National or State bank a success. Some 
of the New York banks, which you are 



helping to feed through your home bank 
depositories are paying from one hundred 
to two hundred per cent, annual divi- 
dends. 

Think of it ! Getting back In dividends 
each year the amount of this priginal in- 
vestment. Can you not see now how 
money grows and how through your own 
neglect, you are not getting your share ? 
Can you not see why it is that other men 
in other callings are outstripping you In 
this race. Can you not see that the 
money which you maJce during the sum- 
mer should be working for you and earn- 
ing semething for you during the long 
winter months when nature enforces 
comparative idleness ? 

The ownership and management of 
your own banks is the second step In the 
advancement of your cause. From the 
profits of this enterprise will come other 
investments that will increase your pres- 
ent earnings one hundred per cent. 

Of the first profits from your bank you 
should build a county elevator, where the 
farmer of small means can take his grain 
at any time of year when prices are low 
and deposit his grain and take his ware- 
house receipt to the bank and get seven- 
ty-five per cent, of the value of his grain 
advanced until the market price is suf- 
ficiently high for him to sell. I know 
hundreds ol farmers who are too poor 
to carry their grain over a low market 
and are compelled to sell to get their 
money regardless of price. 

I hope soon to see the day when farm- 
ers and laborers of Pennsylvania will set 
the example for the world and begin the 
concentration of their energies along 
scientific lines. Own your own commer- 
cial enterprises, own your own banks 
and trust companies under the manage- 
ment of yourselves and your sons. 

Your sons are ambitious; they want to 
make money; they want to go to the cities 
in a vain search for opportunity. They 
know that your money is going there. 
Keep your money at home and let your 
sons know -that you need their help to 
manage It and this problem of keeping 
the young men upon the farm will have 
been solved. 

Your stewardship has been faulty, cor- 
rect it at the earliest moment before It 
is too late. It Is not merely a questlAi 
of immediate or future profit; but a duty 
which you owe to your families and hu- 
manity. 

Suppose the farmers and laborers of 
any one county unite in the mutual own- 
ership of their own savings bank and 
trust company, and It proves a great suc- 
cess, which It surely will — then supopse 
each county in the State and nation fol- 
lows, which It will as surely as the day 
follows the night. Then I ask you, who 
are the money kings of the country — ^Wall 
Street, which does not create a single 
real dollar, or you men and women who 
are each year producing in actual wealth 
more money than the entire gold pro- 
duction of the United States from the 



26 



time of the first gold discovery up to the 
present day ? This is not a mere state- 
ment, but an actual fact. 

The total sum of gold produced In the 
United States since the date of the first 
discovery up to ,the present 'day, is lesfv, 
than two and a half billion of dollars, 
while the American farmer is now pro- 
ducingf each year In actual cash from his 
crops and live stock between four and 
five billion of dollars. Can't you see, my 
friends, that the farmers and laborers of 
this country are the producers and the 
real owners of the actual cash. 

In marketing;: this season's crop, * this 
vast sum of rtioney passes through your 
hands first, and if^you would retain con- 
trol of your surplus after deducting your 
pro(Jucing cost, you are, at once the Icings 
of tbe money-^ower' fff this country, be- 
cause Wall Street has no money of its 
own. It has nothing but stocks and 
bonds, you are the real possessors of the 
real cash. 

The farmer and the laborer need have 
no quarrel with capital if they can be 
trained to use the surplus wealth "^hich 
they produce as represented in their own 
net cash earnings, in a scientific manner. 

In no instance do we seek to antagonize 
capital. We merely want to husband and 
control our own forces and with this atti- 
tude the capitalist can find no fault. 
. If through this means we can elevate 
the farmers' conditioii individually and as 
a class, it means that" all other classes, 
business njen and financiers as well, are 
correspondingly benefitted, for the true 
source of wealth and prosperity must 
spring from the prosperity of the many 
and not the few. 

All local bankers should welcome this 
condition — full 40 per cent of the farmers 
and laborers do not carry any bank ac- 
count. It is infinitely better that we 
teach them to save their money and in- 
vest it wisely than that it should be 
squandered in the indiscriminate invest- 
ment of mining and otjiier wild cat 
schemes. 

Strong banks in a community reflect , 
the financial strength of the community. 
It is the strength of the individual that 
makes strong communities. So in our 
■effort to strengthen the farmers and la- 
borers class individually and collectively 
we should have the hearty co-operation 
of all broad minded bankers and business 
mien in general. 



THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A 
GRANGERS' BANK IN ANY COUUNTY 
WILL NOT ONLY NOT LESSEN IN 
ANY DEGREE THE EARNING POWER: 
OF ANY OTHER BANK ALREADY ES- 
TABLISHED, BUT ON THE CONTRARY 
BECAUSE OF THE NEW BUSINESS 
CREATED AND THE INCRBASBD- 
AND WIDE SPREAD INDIVIDUAL 
PROSPERITY AND THRIFT THAT 
MUST NECESSARILY FOLLOW THIS- 
MOVEMENT. 

Shall we wait, or shall we take the 
lead, shall we coax and beg, or shall we 
demand our rights in the name of hu- 
manity and of those we love. The owner- 
ship of railroads, the ownership of the 
trusts, the ownership of the commercial 
supremacy of this world, and above all. 
else the control of this Government which 
rightfully belong to you lies within your 
reach. Will you grasp the opportunity ? 
It is for you to say if Pennsylvania will 
be the central star in this movement to- 
ward the people's freedom — the people's 
happiness and the world's prosperity. 

With the means that is annually being 
placed In our hands, and with the help 
of Him who is always behind the right, 
we fail In our duty as citizens, we fall in 
our duties to our families, and In our 
duty to God in the refusal of our Indi- 
vidual aid, in this struggle to save our 
people and ourselves from the money 
slavery which is surely closing in upon us. 

OPPORTUNITY. 

"Master of human destinies am I; 
Love, Fame and Fortune on my foot- 
steps wait; 
Cities and fields I walk. I penetrate 
Deserts and seas remote, and passing by 
Hovel and mart and palace, soon or late 
I knock unbidden once at every gait. 
If sleeping wake ! If feasting rise 
Before I turn away ! It is the hour of 

Fate 
And those who follow me, reach every 

state 
Mortals desire, and conquer every foe 
Save death; but they who doubt or hesi- 
tate, . 
Condemned to failure, penury and woe. 
Seek me in vain, and uselessly Implore 
I hear them not, and I return no more," 
Farmers and toilers of all classes, 
your opportunity is before you; may you 
have the strength and courage and help 
of God to unite and grasp It. 



Advertising Rates, "Pennsylvania Grange News" 

Official Organ Pennsylvania State Grange. ^ 
A Special Publication Going To a Special People. 



Full Page 

Per line rate 



$20 Half Page $12 Quarter Page $7.50 

-One Cent per line for each 1,000 copies of circulation^ 



October 1905» Circtilatioxi Mras 15»000 
February 1906, Circulation 25.000 



\. 



27 



A SPRING CLEANING. 

Yes, clean your house and clean your 
shed, 

And clean your bam in every part; 
But brush the cobwebs from your head. 

And sweep the snowbanks from your 
heart . 
Yes, when spring" cleaning comes around, 

(Bring forth the duster and the broom; , 
But rake your fogy notions down, 

And sweep your dusty soul of gloom. 

Sweep old ideas with the dust, 

And dress your soul in newer style; 
Scrape from your mind its worn out 
crust, 

And dump it in the rubbish pile. 
Sweep out the hates that burn and 
smart, 

Bring in new love serene andjDure; 
Around the hearthstone of thy heart 

iPlace modern styles of furniture. 

Clean out the brain's deep rubbish hole, 

Soak every cranny, great and small, 
And In the front room of the soul 

Hang prettier pictures on the wall. 
Scrub up the windows of the mind. 

Clean up, and let the spring begin; 
Swing open wide the dusty blind 

And let the springtime sunshine In. 

Plant flowers in the soul's front yard. 

Set out new shade and blossom trees. 
And let the soul, once frozen hard, 

Sprout crocuses of new ideas. 
Yes, clean your house and clean your 
shed. 

And clean your barn In every part; 
But brush the cobwebs from your head. 

And sweep the snow banks from your 
heart. 



please tell me about your system In 
Pennsylvania, and give me any sug- 
gestion that you think would be help- 
ful to us here. 

J. J. JOHNSON, 
Portland, Oregon. 



From Far-away Oregon. 

Believing your State to be one of 
the most enterprising of all oui* 
Grange States in the matter of co- 
operative buying and selling and be- 
ing very desirous of getting some sug- 
gestions from practical experience, I 
take the liberty to trespass upon 
your time and patience. I am now 
filling my third term as Master of 
Evening Star Grange, which has a 
membership of 250 — the largest 
Grange in Oregon. We have a good 
hall and a fine piano and are free of 
debt. 

I have been urging co-operative 
buying, but we are without practical 
experience alongjthese lines; but we 
-now have a good committee to look 
fully into the whole question in order, 
If possible, to settle down to some 
safe and practical system. Will you 



Mt. Bethel, Pa., Feb. 15, 190$. 
Worthy Master S. G. 
W. F. Hill : 

Bro. C. H. Dildine, Rohrsburg, Col- 
ampton County, Wednesday morning, 
umbia County, left Mt, Bethel, North- 
Feb. 14, for his home, after having 
spent some time in Northampton Co. 
in the interest of our noble order. 

On Tuesday evening a public meet- 
ing was called at Mt. Bethel Grange 
Hall, when Bro. Dildine gave an illus- 
trated talk on rural telephones. The 
meeting then passed resolutions and 
a committee was appointed to draft 
plans for the building of a line in 
Upper Mt. Bethel and report at a fu- 
ture meeting at the call of the chaii;- 
man of the Committee. 

E. P. SMITH, Sec'y., 



BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU SAY. 

In speaking of a person's faults, 

Pray, don't forget your own; 
Remember, those with homes of glass 

'Should seldom throw a stone. 
If we have nothing else to do 

Than talk of those who sin, 
'Tis better to commence at home, 

And from that point begin. 

We have no right to judge a man 

Until he's fairly tried. 
Should we not like his company, 

We know the world is wide. 
Some may have faults, and who have not? 

The old as well as young; 
Perhaps we may, for aught we know. 

Have fifty to their one. 

I'll tell you of a better plan, 

And find It works full well — 
To try my own defects to cure 

Ere others' fauts I 'tell; 
And though I sometimes hope to be 

No worse than some I know. 
My own shortcomings bid me let 

The faults .of others go. 

Then let us all when we begin 

To slander friend or foe, 
Think of the harm one word may do 

To those we little know; 
Remember, curses sometimes, like 

Our chickens, "roost at home;" 
Don't speak of others' faults until 

We have none of our own. 



Bach Pomona should designate some one whose duty it would be to send 
to "Penn'a. Grange News" announcements of the date, programme and place 
of meetings of the Pomona Grange for publication in this paper. These should 
be sent early as possible, as it is to be remembered that the magazine appears 
monthly. After meetings have been held it will be well to send such resolu- 
tions as are of a National or State character and of general importance that 
they, too, may be published. Bear In mind that this publication is entirely 
In the interest of our Order and its mission Is to serve the Order everywhere 
In every possible way. 



When the Deputy Sister Nickerson inspected Roulette Grange, No. 1289, 
Potter County, all the manuals, except one, were closed while the Grange 
conferred the Third and Fourth Degrees. Good ! And they are not a year old 
yet. You surely can soon confer all degrees without a manual at all, and then 
how proud of you Potter County will be. Planning to build a hall, too, next 
year, into the bargain. 



A SUGGESTED FARMERS' PLATFORM. 

At a conference of leading Grange workers and representative members 
of agricultural organizations, held at Harris-burg, March 2, the following 
basic propositions were suggested as the farmers' platform for the State and 
county campaign of 1906. We ask all political parties to assert the same In 
their respective platformis, and that candidates for the various State offices, 
Including the House and Senate slaall be pledged to support these reforms . 

It is recommended that voters everywhere see to it that only such m^H 
ai:s pledged to support these be placed in nomination. Legislative Committees 
of Granges and other farm organizations should see that candidates are 
pledged to these measures. 

WE WANT — 

(1) Trolleys to be given the right to carry freight. 

(2) Every candidate to pledge to not accept personal transportation 
favors from any transportation company during the term of office to which 
he aspir-^s. We recommend the "No Pass" order of the railroad companies. 

(3) We want the corporations to live up to the Constitution of the 
State. 

The mining of coal by transportation companies, directors furnishing sup- 
plies to their own corporations, the owning or operating of parallel or com- 
peting lines we want stopped. 

(4) We want no discrimination in freight rates. 

(5) Uniform passenger rate of two cents a mile. 

(6) Licenses and personal property taxes returned to the counties. 

(7) Equalization In taxation. 

(8) An increase of State aid for township roads from 15 to 50 per cent. 

(9) An increased appropriation for centralized township schools; also, 
township high schools. 

Are you for these reforms ? 

If so, help agitate. Tell your neighbor and get his help. 



Northern Grown, Healthy, Vii^orous Seeds 

Best new and many standard varieties. Price low as consistent with best seed . We are 
always glad to receive orders from Brother Patrons and Granges. Send us your order now so 
we may save some of our Best Seed and ship to you soon as the weatBer permits. Good 
Patrons Want The Very Best SEED ; It Pays Best. 

CHas. W. Ford (BL Co. 

ONTARIO CO. NKW YORK 



BEGIN NOW ! 



We Mean You, 
Brother Grang^er: 

T . iE WANTiYOU to begin now to semd your orders 

Wl for anything you need in the House or on the Farm. 

Because we sell everything at less price than other 

firms under contract with the Pennsylvania State Grange. 

We sell to authorized Granges if order is sent to us un- 
der seal on 30 days time and also give a liberal freight al- 
loTvance. 

We put up goods so they can be easily distributed. Our 
method gives the Secretary least work. Any goods not 
satisfactory can be returned at our expense. 

Your, Grange will gro^sr in numbers and attendance if 
you will use the co-operative features through us. 

Our Grocery and Hardware Catalog now ready for 
March. Each member should have one. Write for it and 
mention Grange News. 



Specials for March. 



Bulk Rio Roasted CofCe, per lb. 12»4c 

Sugars are low now. 

Cash Money Tea, mixed, pound 40c 

4 pieces Chinese money with 
every pound. 

Oro Java Blend Coffee, good value 
at 25e, only 18c 

Selected G-reen Coffee 15c 

Carbon Oil, High Grade, per gal.. 8c 
Charge of $1.25 for barrel, f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 
French CereaJl Coffee, pound. . . . 07c 

Cocoa, in pound cans 25c 

Fine Syrup, in gallon cans 30c 

RolUd Oats, new, pound 03 ^c 



Life Breakfast Food, dozen .... 84c 

Puffed Rice, dozen pkgs 95c 

Japan Rice, pound 05 

Navy Beans, bushel 1.60 

Lima Beans, pound 07c 

H. O, Pancake Flour, dozen.... 1.00 

Crackers, Oyster, Soda or Butter 
barrel lots, S^^c and 6c. 

Pie Peaches, 3-lb can, doz 95c 

Apples, 3-lb can, doz 95 

Fine Corn, 2-lb cans, doz 60 

Tomatoes 3-lb can, doz 1.20 

Baked Beans 3-lb can doz 75c 

Red Sajlmon 1-lb can, doz 1.20 



'' 



SPECIALS FOR MARCH— Continued. 



Santa Clara Prunes, pound 2 5 -lb 

box 07c 

Family White Fish, Salted, 1001b 

nackasre ....•.••• 4t 7 o 

Medium Pickerel, Salted 100-lb 

package 4.25 

Freight paid in lots of 200 pounds 
and over. 
Rice's Poultry Grit and Egg Pro- 
ducer, $6.00 per ton. No freight 

allowed. 100-lb bags. 
Smoking Tobacco, 10-lb boxes 

per pound V^VzO, 

Index Natural Leaf Plug, 16 oz, 

per pound 25c 

Powdered Soap, 4 -lb packages, 

doz packages 1.50 

Copperas, 251b lots S8c 

G-lauber Salts 25-lb lots 87c 

Epsom Salts, 25-lb lots 67c 

Sulphur, 25-ilb lots 73o 

Carbolic Acid Crystals, 1-lb bottles 28c 
Cough Syrup, our own, 75c bottle 25c 

2-ply Felt Roofing, best 60c 

3-ply Felt Roofing, best 80c 

Steel Roofing, Painted, Square.. 2.00 



IRON BED. 

Head, 55 inches, foot 41 inches; 
brass top rails, brass vases, and full 
brass top mounts with spindles and 
rail knobs. Price $4.40. 



BED SPRING. 

120 coils of best tempered spring 
wire, Guaranteed. Price, $2.00 



KITCHEN CABINET. 

Made of oak, dark golden finish, 
hardwood top, two drawers and one 
sliding board; size of top, 28 x 40 
inches. Price, $2.60. 



MEN'S OVERAIiliS. 

Made of heavy blue denim, two 
front pockets, one hip pocket. Double 
front and patent buttons. Price, 45c 

Men's Cordoran Bals., grain top, 
Engli^ back stays and exceptionally 
strong shoe, all sizes, $3.50 

Men's Hoyts Byron dress shoe5» in 
box calf, velore calf or vici-kid. First 
class materials used in the bonstruc- 
tion. Price, $2.19. 



Punton work shoe, drill lined, sew- 
ed and screwed fastened soles. Strong 
and serviceable shoes. Price, $2.2£i. 

Men's heavy unlined pegged shoeis, 
steel heels, full soles and tops. 
Price, $1.39. 

American Lady Shoe, made of the 
choicest materials and the newest 
styles. Price, $2.98. 

Ladies' Heavy navy Calf Bals. Mc- 
Kay sewed, double soles and stock 
tips. An extra strong shoe. Price, 
$1.00 



MEN'S WORK SHIRT. 

Made of strong cheviot, nice 
assortment of patterns, and will give 
excellent wear. Fast colors. Price 
38c. 



BRONCHO WORK SUSPENDERS. 

Made of heavy web, police or cross 
back, genuine horse hide ends. Guar- 
anteed for one year. Price, 39c. 



MEN'S WORK SOCKS. 

100 dozen pairs. Made of nice, 
clean yarn, and will wear good. 4 
pairs for 25c. 



LADIES' SHIRTWAIST. 

Made of a pin novelty -cloth, in 
tan, blue, red and black, with small 
white dots. Bishop sleeves, pearl 
buttons, and yoke back. Pricci $1.00. 



COTTON BATTING. 

14-oz rolls, great quality, 9c roll. 
14-oz rolls, very clean and lofty 
quality 10c 



LACE CURTAINS. 

3l^ yards long, 50-inch wide, neat 
floral design, finished with over-lock 
stiched edg#s. Price, $1.39. 



LADIES' UNDERWEAR. 

Medium weight, jersey ribbed, long 
sleeves and closely knitted. Two 
pieces. Price 25 cents. 



The Garver Bros. Co., 

^TRA^BURG. OHIO. 



\ 



ORIGINAL 



Grange Grocery House 



%$ave Money 

BY 

Buying' Direct 



THORNTON BARNES 

WHOLESALE GR(5CER 

223 North Water St. Philadelphia, Pa. 




|LL orders, under seal of Grange and signed by 
Master and Secretary are filled in quantities to 
suit, and thirty days allowed in which to receive 
and examine goods before paying for same. 

When ordering on Trade Card ^Cash must ac- 
company the order. i 




We Guarantee All Goods 

to be pure and of the best quality. All goods that are not 
as represented can be returned at OUr expense. 

All goods are carefully packed and delivered at the 
depot in Philadelphia free of charge. 

Send for Grange price list and be convinced. 



MENTION GRANGE NEWS 



GRANGE CO-OPERATIVE MAIL ORDER HOUSE 



Lubin (Sl Company; 

27 Walker Street NEW YORK 



,f-^ 



■<<'" 



SPECIMEN VALUES FROM OUR BULLETIN NUMBER NINETEEN, GRANGE 

CO-OPERATIVE EDITION. 

Out lat'est bulletin has been sent, out only to our cuistomers this time and not 
to the large Idsit of names supplied us by Worthy Masiter Hill. B^illietiin No. 19 oon- 
tajins the complete report of tihe Grange Co-Op€(ratlv€ Oommittee. It makes most 
Interesting' reading. 

Bulletin No. 19 contains also a lot of very interesting articles of merohandlse, of 
which tiho'se S'hown aboye are only examples. 

If you have not received a copy, drop us a poistal at onoe. Ask for Bulletin No. 
19 Orange CJo-OperaJtive Edition. Read our geneirous C. O. D. offer. 

"This arrangement Is, In my opinion, tlie most perfect and complete business 
arrangement that the State Grange has ever made." — Geo. W. Oster, Sec'y. Ex. Com. 







WAIST SET— 58 Cents. 

2x104. Think of producing a 
ShiilPt Waisit like this picture at the 
nomiinal oosit of 58 cents. A made- 
up waist of this style and quality 
would sell for at least $2.00. This 
pattern consists of 2^ yards of 
wheer fine lawn (40 Inches wide), 
together with a front and two 
bands, beautifully* embroidered in 
mercerized thread. The patterns 
ane raised and closely Imitate the 
fine Irish handwork now so iwpular 
on lingerie waists. The picture 
suggests one style of making up. 
A woman, clever with her needle, 
could fashion far more beautiful 
designs by the addition of .a little 
lace. Price per set complete 
read-to-make 58 cents. 



If you wish your package sent 
by mail, be sure to send enough 
money to cover postage. 

"We send packages by Express C. 
O. D. when one quarter the amount 
accompanies the order. 



THE LEADER 
$4.15 
2000. Tha^Jltl^eader," 
Tan Covert Jacket. Dou- 
ble-breasted, half-fitting 
front. Pointed sitrap front 
and back over shoulder. 
Two sitraps from yoke to 
patch pocket. Stitching 
and cord between straps. 
Tight fitting back 
trimmed to c orrespond 
with ^ronit. Plat stitched 
down collEW with 5 button 
trimmed pointed tabs. 
Sleeve gart:hered at shoul- 
der with turned bjuck cuff. 
Poixr tucks from cuff to 
elbow. This coat Is lined 
througihout with sateen. 
In Tan Covert. Siz^es, 32 
44. $4.15 




SILK TAFFETA RIBBON. 

Pine slUc Taffeta Ribbon, of pure, brigOit silk, 
close in weave, sof In textixre, and rich in color 
expression. Just the ribbon for neckwear, beHts, 
haiir, bows, millinery and dress itrimmings. 
■Jomes in weave, soft in texture.and rich in color 
diinaJl, Navy, Brown, and Green. Comes in the 
following widths: 

580. Width, 1 Inch .3 ots. yd. 

581. Width, 1% inches 5 cts. yd. 

582. Widith, 2% inches T'/z ©ts. yd. 

583. WIdtlh, 8 Vs Inches 10 ots. yd. 



SPECIAL VALUE PURE LINEN HANDKER- 
CHIEFS. 

..1x62. Women's Handkerohlef of pure Irish 
linen woth narow hemstitched border 5 cents 

5216. Womien's pure Irish linen hemstitched 
Handekerohdef, GObid weight, close texture, soft 
bleach .6 for 45 cents, or 8 cents each. 

5217. Women's fine linen hemstitched Hand- 
kerchief. ■ Close, sheer weave, sof bleach, beau- 
tiful quality....* for 67 cents, or 12 cents each 



i 



«l» 



T*. 



Ofliceils of ti^e Pennsylvania State Grange 

Master, W.F.mLli, Chamberaburg, Franklin Co. 

Overseer,' HON. A. C. BARRETT, NewMilford, Susquehanna Co. 

Lect^^e^, i^. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, TteODORB KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne Go. 

Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, Goshenville, Chester Co. 

Chaplain, REV. J. W. JOHNSONi LaCeyviUe, Wyoming Co. •, 

Treasurer, S. E. N^^IN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 

Secretary, J. T.^AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 

Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 

Ceiw, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 

Flora, MRS. J.'S. DALE, State College, Centre Co. 

Pomona, MRS.'MARY FISHER, lincohi University, Chester Co. . • r. 

L. A. S^, MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, MillviUage, Erie Co. 



\ 



Executive Committee 

I. FRANK CBfAljDLER, Toughkenambn, Chester Co. 

\ . \ C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 



Q. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



I 



/ Finance Committee 

a B. MoWILlilAMS, Bumham, Mifflin Co. 

S. B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

JOHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co. 



E^egislative Committtoe 

W. F.HILL.Chamben»burg. Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co. 
E. B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



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E PEKMSYLVANIA 




GHAMBERSBURG, PA. 







FEBR UARY 






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HS"-iVt-r()-'v- ;..* ' 




REGISTER 



State, Ponto^a, and Subordinate Grange Officers. List of Bus- 
iness Houses under contract with the State Grange. 



PCNNSYI^VANIA, 1906 



Master — W. F, Hill, Chartibersburg, 
Franklin Co. 

Overseer — ^A. C. Barrett, New Milford, 
Susquehanna Co. 

Lecturer — Albert M. Cornell, Colum- 
bia X Roads, Bradford Co. 

Steward — Theo. Kline, Lake Ariel, 
Wayne Co. 

Assistant Steward — Harry H. Pratt, 
Goshenville, Chester Co. 

Chaplain — Rev. J. W. Johnson, Skin- 
ner's Eddy, Wyoming Co. 

Treasurer — ^S. E. Nivin, Landenburg, 
Chester Co. 

Secretary — J, T. Ailman, Thompson- 
town, Juniata Co. 

Gatekeeper — Wallace Chase, Fall 
Brook, Tioga Co. 

Ceres — Mrs. Velma West, Corry, R. 
F. D. No. 4, Erie Co. 

Pomona — Mrs. Mary M. Fsher, Lin- 
coln University, Chester Co. 

Flora — Mrs, Carrie Dale,State College, 
Centre Co., R. F. D. No. 3. 

L. A. S. — Mrs. Frances Arters, Mill 
Village, Erie Co. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

G. W. Oster, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 

Chas. H. Dildine, Rhorsburg, Colum- 
bia Co. 

I. Frank Chandler, Toughkenamon, 
Chester Co. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

John T. Patton, Warrior's Mark, 
Huntingdon Co. 

D. B. McWilliams, Burnham, Mifflin 
Co. 

S. B. Brown, Sulphur Springs, Bed- 
ford Co. 



OFFICERS OF NATIONAL GRANGE 

MASTER — N. J. Bachelder, Concord, 
N H 

OVERSEER — ^T. C. Atkeson, Mor- 
gantown, W. Va. 

LECTURER — Geo. W. F. Gaunt, Mul- 
lica Hill, N. J. 

STEWARD — J. A. Newcomb, Golden, 
Colo. 

ASST. STEWARD — T. F. Marchant, 
West Kingston, R. I. 

CHAPLAIN — W. K. Thompson, Lib- 
erty Hill. S. C. 

TREASURER-.::Mrs. Eva S. McDow- 
ell, Rome, N; Y. 

SECRETARY — ^C. M. Freeman, Tip- 
pecanoe City, Ohio. 

GATE KEEPER — A. C. Powers, 
Beloit, Wis. 

CERES— rMrs. Charlotte R. F. Ladd, 
Sturbridge, Mass, 



FLORA — Mrs. Amanda M. Horton» 
Fruit Ridge, Mich, 

POMONA — Mrs. Sarah G. paird, 
Bdina Mills. Minn. 

LADY ASST. STEWARD — ^Mrs. Jo- 
hanna M, Walker, Marshallton, 
Delaware. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

E. B. Norris, Sodu's, N, Y. 

C. J. Bell, East Hardwick. Vt. 

F. A. Derthick, Man*Nia Station, Ohio. 
N. J. Bachelder, Con^brd, N. H. 



MASTERS OF STATE* ^JVANGES. 

CALIFORNIA— W. V. Griffith, Gey- 
serville. 

COLORADO — J. A. Newcomb, Golden. 

CONNECTIOUT^Orson S. Wood, 
Ellington. 

DEiLAWARE — Heryey Walker, Mar- 
shallton. v 

ILLINOIS — Oliver Wilson, Magnolfai^ ' 

INDIAiNA — Aaron Jones, South Bend: 

IOWA — ^A. B. Judson, Hillsdale. 

KANSAS — E. W. Westgate, Manhat- 
tan. 

KENTUCKY — F. P, Wolcott, Cov- 
ington. 

MARYLAND — J. B. Ager, Hyattsville. 

MASSACHUSETTS— Carlton D. Rich- 
ardson, West Brookfleld. 

MINNESOTA — ^Sarah G. Baird, Edina.. 
Mills. 

MAINE — O. Gardner. Rockland. i 

MrSSOURI— C. O. Raine, Monticello-. ' 

MrOHIGAN — Geo. B. Horton, Fruit 
Ridge, 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— H. O. Hadley, 
Temple. 

NEW JERSEY — Geo, W. F. Gaunt, 
Mullica Hill, 

NEW YORK— E. B. Norris, Sqdus. 

OHIO — F. A. Derthick, Mantua 
Station. 

OREGON — B. G. Leedy, Tigardville. 

PENNSYLVANIA — W. F. HILU 
Chambersburg. 

RHODE ISLAND — F. E. Marchant, 
West Kingston. 

SOUTH CAROLINA— W. K. Thomp- 
son, Liberty Hill. 

TENNESSEE — W. L. Richardson, 
Brownsville. 

TEXAS — R. D. McGee, O'Daniel. 

VERMONT — C. J. Bell, East Hard- 
^ick 

WAISKIN'gtON — C. B. Kegley, Pull- 
man. 

WEST VIRGINIA — T, C. Atkeson, 
Morgantown. 

WISOONtSIN— A. C. Powers, Beloit. 



ttJi^^ 



:.|'■■Z-'^:.f^■.^.■l^^*il;^.;JfV4•-*»^■^iwl^ 



DEPUTIES FOR 1906 



ALLEGHENY. 

J. H. McElhenny, No. 1276, Pinley- 
ville, R. F. D. No. 99. 

ARMSTRONG. 

W. Crosby, No. 915, Vandergift. 
S. S. Blyholder, No. 537, Neale. 
L. J. Wolfe, No. 497, Kellersburg. 
W. H. Hays, No. 5 93, Adrain. 

BEDFORD. 

G. W. Oster, No. 737, Osterburg. 

S. B. Brown, No. 531,'Sulphur Springs. 

BERKS. 

E. K. Bohn, No. 551, Robesonia. 
P. Leonard Reber, No. 29, S'hoemak- 
ersville. 

BLAIR. 

Martin Gates, No. ' 1275, Yellow 

Springs. 
Frank M. Glas^lv, No. 664 ,Bellwood. 

BRADFORD. 

A. T. LViey, No. 153, LeRoy. 

Asa S. Llerens, No. 272, Towanda, 

R. F. D. No. 8. 
N. D. Snyder, No. 178, Wyaulsing, R. 

F. D. No. 37. 

BUCKS and PHILADELPHIA. 

William T. Newbold, No. 684, Lang- 
horne. 

UPPER BUCKS. 

..W. H. Weamer, No. 998, Springtown. 

^ BUTLER. 

rS. B. Bricker, No. 1105, Carbon Black. 
. John Leise, 908, Gallery. 

CAMBRIA. 

James Farabaugh, No. 1126, Bradley 

Junction. 
J"ohn Wright. No. 1119, Wilmore. 

CAMERON. 

H. H. Hall, No. 1204, Ellisburg, Potter 
Co. 

CENTRE. 

John S. Dale, No. 109, State College, 

R. F. D. No. 3. 
J. S. Frain. No. 253, Mill Hall, CHnton 

Co, 

CHESTER. 

J. H. Hicks, No. 121, West Chester, 

R. F. D. No. 2. 
"Geo. R. North, No. 1179, Lyndell. 

CLEARFIELD. 

E. M. Davis, No. 534, Grampian. 
'Harrison Straw, No. 1146, Kerrmoor. 

A. H. Read, No. 623, Clfearfield. 
*0. B. Wachob, No. 964, Luthersburg. 

CLARION. 

K. Lr. McClain, No. 1101, Mlola. 

Ed. M. McEntire, No. 654, Frampton. 

CLINTON. 

I.. T. Lundy, No. 303, Mill Hall. 



CRAWFORD. 

D. H. LeFever, No. 901, Meadville. 
Anson George. No. 1134, Seagertown. 

CUMBERLAND. 

J. T. Kast, No. 362, Mechanicsburg. 

DELAWARE. 

Wm. T. Pyle, 1141, Ward. 

ELK. 

C. E. Green, No. 628, Kersey. 
Herman J. Gregory, No. 1155, St. 

Mary's. 

ERIE. 

Thos. Hurst, No. 997, Albion. 
Bert Austin, No. 147, Wattsburg. 

FAYETTE. 

Arthur P. Freed, No. 1022, Vander- 
bilt. 

FULTON. 
J. M. Drake. No. 933, Saltillo. 

GREENE. 

S. B. Day, No. 1055, Washington. 

INDIANA. 

J. L. Kinnan, No. 537, Ord. 

Charles A. Morris, No. 503, Oliveburg. 

HUNTINGDON. 

W. T. Boring, No. 1134, Colfax. 

JEFFERSON. 

G. H. iSmail, No, 770, Greene Valley. 
J. K. Womeldorf, No. 1264, Reynolds- 
ville. 

JUNIATA. 

D. B. Esh. No. 772, Spruce Hill. 

LACKAWANNA. 

A. F, Hobbs, No. 1119, Fleetville. 
Frank Morrow, No. 251, Shultzville. 
J. A. Yeager, No. 89 9, Aberdeen. 

LANCASTER. 

James G. MoSparran. No. 66, Furniss, 

LEHIGH. 

L. B. Geiger, No, 869, Hoffmans, 
LOWER WYOMING & NORTHERN 

LUZERNE. 

Wm. Armstrong, No. 819, Alderson. 
John E, Morgan, No. 641, Beaumoat. 

LYCOMING. 

Hon. Frank Porter, No. 1, Mont- 
gomery. 
Lazarus Murray, No. 116,0, Muncy. 

MERCER. 

W. N. Hoyt, No. 608, Clark's Mills. 
E. E. Foulk, No. 538, Hadley. 

McKEAN. 

W. E. Sawyer. No. 1182, Wright's. 

MONTOUR. 

A. H. Litchard, No. 1150, Muncy. 



' >. 



Pomona Granges for 1900. 



COLUMBIA. 

C. H. Dildine, No. 108, Rohrsburg. 
G. "W. Henrie, No. 128, Orangeville. 
H. Bruce Larned, No. 398, Hunting- 
ton Mills, Luzerne Co. 

MONTGOMERY. 

W. H. WagndV, No. 25 Pottstown. 

Anna H. Bisbing, No. 606, Norris- 
town. 

B. P. Dannehower, No. 760, Spring- 

house. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

D. M .Weber, No. 971, Redington. 
W. H. Reagle, No. 1100, Mt. Bethel. 

NORTHUMBERIiAND. 

C. N. Marsh, No. 249, Milton. 

PERRY. 

Amos Fleisher, No. 1069, Newport. 

POTTER. 

Mrs. Gertie Nickerson, No. 1183, 

Ulysses. 
T. M. Burt, No. 1194, Ulysses, R. F. 

D.. No. 3. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

J. H. Dunkleberger, No. 124 2, Hegins. 
John Shoener, No. 1256, New Ring- 
gold. 
Chas. Haskins, No. 333, Shenandoah. 

SOMERSET. 

H. J. Hoffman, No. 897, Husband. 

SULLIVAN. 

J. E. Bird, No. 976, Millview. 

SUSQUEHANNA. 

A. C. Barrett, No. 289, New MHford. 
W. B. France, No. 927, West Auburn. 



B. C. Tourge, No. 289, New Milford. 

TIOGA. 

John M. Seamans, No. 1088, Westfleld. 
E. B. Dorsett, No. 1009, Wellsboro. 
Jerry Desmond, No. 1056, Nauvoo. 
J. L. Hager, No. 918, Mansfield. 
Mrs. Stella Pratt, No. 913. Mansfield. 

UNION. 

Prof. Wm. Richart, No. 122, New 
Columbia. 

VENANGO. 

E. L. Owens, No. 8 93, Venus. 

WARREN. 

D. B. Trisket, No. 875, Corry, R. F. D. 

No. 4. 

WASHINGTON. 

J. Elliott Stewart, No. 334, Hanlin 

Station. R. F. D. No. 54. 
J. B. Painter, No. 179, Avella. 

WAYNE. 

Hon. W. C. Norton, No. 1041, Alden- 
ville. 

C. H. Williams, No. 1041, Pleasant 

Mount. 

WESTMORELAND. 

D. K. Hissen. No, 862, Geary. 

H. A. VanDyke, No. 855, Waltz's Mill. 
M. N. Clark, No. 848, Clarldge. 
A. Bilheimer, No. 855, Ruffdale. 

WYOMING. 

O. E. Reynolds. No. 321, W. Nichol- 
son. 
N. P. Sterling, No. 926, Mes'hoppen. 

YORK. 

P. S. Bowman, No. 810, Hanover. 



POMONA GI?ANGES FOR J906 

In the succeeding Images the first name in each list is that of Master, 
the second Lecturer, and tliird, Secre tary. 



CUMBERLAND, 2. 

Harry B. Markley, Mechanicsburg. 
J, N. Strock, Trindle Springs. 
Ira D. Coover, Mechanicsburg. 

CHESTER and DELAWARE, S. 

W. H. H. Davis, West Chester. 
Frances W. Broomall, Cheyney. 
Emma B. Palmer, Walling|!ord. 

ERIE, 4. 

Archie Billings, Edinboro. 
Mrs. H. H. Rose, Wattsburg. 
E. Estella Kennedy, 101 W. Smith 
St., Corry. 

COLUMBIA & LOWER LUZERNE, 5. 

L. M. Creveling, Stillwater, R. F. D. 

No. 1. I 

E. E. Shultz, Benton, R. F. D. No. 2. 
Grace Eves, Millville. 



3 



HUNTINGDON, 6 

J. C. Steinbach. Aitch.^ .. 
J. L. Grove, Shirleysburg, 
Geo. E. Corcelius, Petersburg, R. D. 
No. 1. 

SUSQUEHANNA, 7. 

C. W. Hoppe, Glenwood. 

A. C. Barrett. New Milford. 

R. Turrell, Birchardville, 

MONTGOMERY, 8. 

Seth T. Walton, Willow Grove. 

A. F. Saylor, Sanatoga. 

Nan W. Lewry. Willow Grove. 

WARREN, 10. 

Henry Mack, Warren, R. D. 
Velma West, Corry. R. D. No. 4. 

ARMSTRONG, 11. 

S. S. Blyholder, Neale, 



»<■ 



iHi 



Pomona Grang^es for 1906. 



W. R. Christy, Ford City. 

W. F. Hill. Vandergrift. R. D. No. 1. 

CENTRE, 13. 

Geo. Dale, State College, R. D. No. 3. 
Willard Dale, State College. R. D. 
No. 3. 

D. M. Campbell, Linden Hall. 

WASHINGTON, 16 

J, B. Painter, Avella. 

Miss Anna Mowl Washington, R. D. 

No. 7. 
R. M. Day, Washington, R, D. No. 1. 

BUTLER, 17. 

J. B. Bricker, Carbon Black, R, F. 

D. No. 17. 
W. W. Vandervoit, Gallery. 
W. H. Campbell, West Sunbury. 

WYOMING, 19 . 

Fred. H. Fassett. Meshoppen. 
Katharine Crisman, Factoryville. 
Minnie Herman, Eatonville. 

JEFFERSON, 20. 

J. M. Morris, Reynoldsville, R. D. 

No. 3. 
Annie E. Bullers, Kirkman. 

E. R. Syphrit, Reynoldsville, R. D. 

No. 3. 

BUCKS & PHILADEIiPHIA. 22. 

Edwin Ridge, Holland. 

Mary M. Scarborough, Pineville. 

Mary W. Betts, Newtown, 

BRADFORD & SULUIVAN, 23. 

C. P. Shaw. Columbia X Roads. 
Hon. L. T. Manley, Canton, 

Mrs. J. S. Mott, Granville, Summit, 
R. D, No. 69. 

BEDFORD. 24. 

S. B. Brown, Sulphur Springs. 

D. W. Rhodes, Saxton. 

C. L. King, New Enterprise, R. D. 
No. 1. 

MERCER. 25. 

W. N. Hoyt, Clark's Mills. 

J. A. Bond, Sandy Lake, R. D. No. 24. 

J. H. A. Bell, Sandy Lake. 

CRAWFORD, 26. 

John Seavey, Saegertown. 

Walter R. Tucker, Cambridge Springs. 

O. J. Cropp, Meadville, R. D. No. 13. 

CLARION, 27. 

J. B , Morrison, Sligo. 

W. H. Jordon. Day. 

Ed. M, McEntire, Frampton. 

LYCOMING, 28. 

A. B. Herbst, Muncy. 

A. J. Kahler, Hughesville. 

Mary Decker, Montgomery. 



TIOGA, 30. 

E. B. Dorsett, Wellsboro, 

Miss Martha A, Mitchell, Wellsboro, 

R. D. No. 2. 
W. H. Whiting. Wellsboro. 

MONTOUR & NORTHUMBERLAND. 

31. 

Charles V. Ammerman, Danville. 
Jas. Lowrie, Strawberry Ridge. 
H. J. Jones, Milton. 

CLEARFIELD, 33. 

Harrison Straw, Kerrmoor. 
W. E. Davis, Troutvill.e 
R. E. Shaw. Clearfield. 

JUNIATA, 35. 

John A. Kohler, Port Royal. 

J. Scott McLaughlin, Port Royal. 

D. B. Esh, Spruce Hill. 

NORTHAMPTON, 36. 

D. M. Weber, Redington. 

M. O. Reagle, Mt. Bethel. , 

Wm. P. Lerch, Freemansburg. 

/^ BLAIR, 37. 

/''D. D. Coleman, Altoona. 

Henry Hawk, 703 Walnut Ave., Al- 
toona. 
T. W. Reilly, Eldorado. 

WESTMORELAJifD, 38. 

W. P. Holtzer, Greensburg, R. D. 

No. 1. 
M. N, Clark, Claridge. 

F. M, Waugamon, Harrison City. 

SOMERSET, 39. 

H, J. Hoffman, Husband. 
Peter Miller. Husband. 
Charles F. Cook, Berlin. 

YORK, 40. 

Henry Wagner, , Hanover. 
D. S. Dubs, Marburg. 
C. A. Grote, Brodbecks. 

WAYNE, 41. 

F. M. ShaffeHrGravity. 
Theo. Klein, Lake Ariel. . 
Geo. J. Knorr, Girdland. 



y^ 



l^. ] 



CLINTON, 29. 

H. Dornblaser. Lamar. 
C. H. Rich, Woolrlch. 
John S. Bossert, Mill Hall. 



^. 



ALLEGHENY, 42. \ 

R. K. MoEwen, Beadling. 
Mrs. S. Lizzie Wilson, McMinn. 
Anna Rosborough, 215 Ohio Avenue. 
Avalon. 

BERKS, 43. 
Daniel W. Bohn, Robesonia. 
F. Leonard Reber, Shoemakersvllle. 
H. A. Miller, Shoemakersvllle. 

NORTHERN LUZERNE & SOUTH- 
ERN WYOMING, 44. 

John Morgan-, Beaumont. 
T. M. Dullard, Wilkes-Barre, 
Wm Armstrong, Alderson. 

LACKAWANNA, 45. 

Lionel Winship, Moscow. 

A. F. Hobbs, Dalton. 

F. L. Thompson, Shultzvllle. 



] 
I 

1 



ALL£GHCNY.AR»}$XRONG. 



UNION, 46. 

D, L. Ruhl, Mifflinburg. 

J. H. Wingert, Lewisburg. 

FAYETTE, 49. 

L. F. Arensburg, East Millsboro. 

David Gans, Uniontown. 

H. D. Core, Uniontown, R. D. No. 4. 

UPPER BUCKS, 50. 

Harry Johnson, Quakertown. 
Melvina Johnson, Quakertown. 
Anna M. Mumbower, Pleasant Valley. 

CAMBRIA, 51. 

James Farabaugh, Bradley Junction. 

Mrs. C. A. Wills, St. Augustine. 

Geo. W. Garrett, Cresson, R. D. No. 1. 



ELK, 52. 

J. R. Meredith, Kersey. 
Herman Gregory, St. Mary's. 
John Schmidt, St. Mary's. 

McKEAN, 53. 

O. W. Abbey, Port Allegheny. 
Mary D. Howden, Coryville. 
James Quirk, Smethport. 

POTTER, 54. 

T. M. Burt, Ulysses. 
Minnie E. Collins, Ulysses. 
H. S. Bartoo, Mills. 

SCHUYLKILIi, 55. 

J. H. I>unkleberger, Hegins. 
W. H. Stout, Pine Grove. 
A. J. Hummel, DeTurksville. 



¥^^- 



Subordinate Grange Officers for 1906 by Counties. 
ALLCGH£NY 



ROBINSON, 897. 

J. M. Shoup, Carnegie, R. D. No. 4. 
Miss Edna H. Shouj!), Carnegie, R. D. 

No. 4. 
J. H. Burkat, Carnegie, R, D. No. 4. 
Second Saturday, Grange Hall. 

SHARON, 904. 

Wm. R. Cole, Coraopolis, R. D. No. 3. 
Chas. H. Dally, Coraopolis, R. D. 

No. 3. 
Gertrude Boggs, Shoustown. 

First Monday evening, Carnot. 

UPPER ST. CliAIR, 1186. 

R. K. McEwen, .Beadling. 

L. N. Fife, R. D. No. 1. 

Evadna Fife, Bridgeville, R. D. No. 1, 

First Tuesday evening, I. O. O. F. 

Hall, Clifton. 



liOCUST RIDGE, J,276. 



i2: 

^*11 



D, 



J. H. McElheny, Finley^lle, R 

No. 1. 
Bertha Miller, Finleyville, R. D. No.l 
Belle Miller, Finleyville, R. D. No. 1 
P. A.— W. W. Wilson, Finleyville. 
Eavery Thursday evening, Hall. 



ARMSTRONG 



UNION, 367. 

P. R. Altimus, Atwood. 

T. J. Altimus, Atwood. 

Jacob Fisher, Atwood. 

Second and Fo.urth Saturday eve- 
nings, Altimus Mills. 

MADISON, 487. 

B. M. Pence, Kellersburg. --■' 
Rev. W. S. Gearhart, Kellersburg. 
Mrs. Ellen Wolfe, Kellersburg. 

Second and Fourth Saturday eve- 
nings. Pence Hall. 



BURNELL, 515. 

T. A. Fiscus, Cochran Mills. 

D. L. King, Kelly's Station, R. D. 

No. 1. 
L. G. Schall, Kelley's Station, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Second and Fourth Saturday eve- 
nings. Grange Hall. 

MT. JOY, 537. 

Samuel Yingst, Leechburg, R. D. 

M. E. Philips, Leechburg, R. D. No. 1. 

G. A. Marvin, Leechburg, R. D. No. 1 

Every Tuesday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

PLEASANT UNION, 549. 

J. T. Ditty, Neale. 
Florence Ditty, Neale. 
W. G. Aye, Neale. 

Thursday eve. I. O. O .F. Hall. 

WASHINGTON, 593. 

J. L. Bowser, Adrian. 
Wm. Hays, Adrian. 
Reed Bowser, Adrian. 

Every Wednesday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

TIDAL. 872. 

L. H. Fleming, Tidal 
G. W. Hines, Tidal. 
T. C. Heath, Tidal. 

First and Third Saturdays, Tidal. 

LAUREL POINT, 915. ^ 

Wm. Crosby. Vandergrift, R. D. No. 1. 

E. A. Crosby, Vandergrift. 
W. F. Hill, Vandergrift. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 
Grange Hall. 

ARMSTRONG, 1234. 

V. L. Barger, Petrolia. R. D, No. 73, 

Butler Co. 
Cora M. Barger, Petrolia, R. D. No. 

73, Butler Co. "^ 

Nellie Jennings, Parker's Landing, R> 

D. No. 69. 
First and third Thursdays, Miller's 

Eddy. 



\ 



BEAVER-BEDFORD-BERKS-BLAIR-BRADFORD. 



B£AV£R 

NEW SHEFFIELD, 960. 

Wm. Roseburg, WooxJlawn, 
Mrs. S. E. Todd. New Sheffield. 
W. H. Baker. New Sheffield. 

Second Tuesday, homes of members. 



ENTERPRISE, 963. 

William Pearson, Calcium. 

E. H. Ahrens, Blandon. 

W. F. Kauffman, Blandon. 

Fortnightly, Residence W. F. Kauff- 
man. 

BLAIR 



* 



BEDFORD 



BUFFALO, 531. 

S. B. Brown, Sulphur Springs. 
S. B. Carpenter, Buffalo Mills. 
Thompson Ling, Buffalo Mills. 

First and third Saturdays, 1:30, 

p. m., Grange Hall. 

EUREKA, 607. 

F. H. McMillen. New Paris. 
W. A. Grazier, New Paris. 
J. A. Cuppet, New Paris, 

Alternate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

BEDFORD, 619. 

Chas. W. Koontz, Bedford, R. D. No.2. 
S. B. Hersberger, Cessna. 
Harrv Heltzel, Cessna. 
Eve Hall. 

OSTERBURG, 737. 

Miley M. Griffith, Osterburg. 
Geo. W. Yont. Osterburg. 
Effle G. Moses, Osterburg. 

Every Wednesday evening, Grange 

Hall. 

LOYSBURG. 1104. 

C. Li. Longenecker, Waterside. 

C. L. King, New Enterprise. 
J. A. Biddle, Loysburg. 

First and third Tuesday ^ evenings, 
Loysburg. 

SAXTON, 1132. 

Joseph Cleves, Riddlesburg. 

D. B. Weaver, Saxton. 
D. W. Rhodes, Saxton. 

P. A. — Jacob Zook, Saxton. 

Alternate Tuesday evenings, Grange 
-Hall. 



BERKS 



INDUSTRY, 29. 

F. Leonard Reber, Shoemakersville. 

H, A. Miller, Shoemakersville. 

Jas. A. Reber, Shoemakersville. 

P. A. — C. S. Dreibelbis, Shoemakers- 
ville. 
Tuesday evening on or before full 
moon. Metropolitan Hall. 

WELCOME HOME, 551. 

Samuel Mardeness, Robisonia, R. D. 

No. 2; box 24. 
E. K. Bohn, Robesonia, R. D. No. 1. 
Davllla Marderness, Robesonia, R. D. 

No. 2; box 23. 
Second Saturday, Robesonia. 



.0 



SINKING VALLEY, 484. 

Thos. L. Coleman, Tyrone. 

Thos. M. Fleck, Tyrone. 

Alex. Templeton, Tyrone, R. D. box 92. 

First and third Saturdays, Sinking: 

Valley. 

SCOTCH VALLEY, 570. 

G. R. Stiffler, Frankstown. 

Mrs. G. R. Stiffler, Frankstown. 

John S. Young. Hollidaysburg. 

P. A. — O. W. Shaw, Hollidaysburg. / 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Geeseytown. 

LOGAN'S VALLEY, 664. 

H. F. Cox, Bellwood, R. D. No. 1. 

Mrs. Nettie Nearhoof. Bellwood, R. D. 
No. 1. 

Frank M. Glasgow, Bellwood. 

First and third Saturdays, Bell- 
wood. 

CLOVER CREEK, 791. 

G. W. Lower, Royer. 

H. M. Eastep, S'hellytown. 

John K. Loose, Larke. 

First and third Saturdays, Larke. 

JUNIATA, 889. 

D. D. Coleman. Altoona. 

Samuel F. Foutz, Altoona, R. F. D. 

No. 1. 
Mattie Coleman, Altoona, R. D. No. 1. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Juni- 

POPLAR RUN, 1137. 

Wm. S. Leighty, Duncansville, R. D. 
No. 2. 

F. H, Weaker, Newry. 

Christie Yqfckley, Duncansville, R. D. 
No. 2.^ 
Second Thursday and last Saturday 
Grange Hall. 

ALLEGHENY, 1154. 

H. S. Wertz, Duncansville, 
J. T. Tate, Duncansville. 
W. H. Stiffier, Duncansville. 

Second and Fourth Saturdays, Hesc 

Hall. 

CANOE VALLEY, 1275. 

G. W. Aurandt, Yellow Springs. 
W. T. Hyle, Yellow Springs. 

S. S. Isenberg, Yellow Springs. 
Last Friday, Yellow Springs. 

BRADFORD 

WYSAUKING, 58. 

N. H. Drake. Towanda, R. D. No. 5. 
Hon. Louis Piolett, Wysox. 
Mrs. Louis Piolett, Wysox. 

Alternate Saturday afternoon and 

evenings. Grange Hall. 



BRADFORD. 



COLUMBIA, 83. 

D. W. Canfleld, Columbia X Roads. 
Ross W. So-per, Columbia X Rroads, 

R. D. No. 59. 
Effle A. Alger, Columbia X Roads, 

R. D. No. 59. 
Every Wednesday evenings, Grange 

D. B. M AUGER, 111. 

Peter Campbell, Athens. R. D. No. 23. 
Clarence Watkins, Milan. 
Jas. P. Campbell, Athens. 

Every Wednesday eveni/ig. Hall. 

OPEN HAND, 153. 

C. D. Holcomb, Canton, R. D. No. 72. 
Jennie Palmer, Canton, R. D. No. 72. 
N. E. Lilley, Canton, R. D. No. 72. 
P. A. — F. J. Bailey, LeRoy. 

Every Tuesday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

UNION. 155. 

F. M. Barnes, Troy, R. D. No. 67. 
Mrs. W. W. Brooks, Troy, R. D. No.66. 
Mrs. Effle Rockwell, Troy, R. D. 
No. 66. 
Every Wednesday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

ULSTER, 173. 



To wan-da, 
Towanda, 



R 



D. 
R. D. 



Arthur Gilmore, 

No. 1. 
Andrew Morrison, 

No. 1. 
Jerry Greening, Ulster, R. D. No. 20. 
Alternate Saturday evenings,Grange 
Hall. 

ONDAWA, 174. 

Prank Huntley, Columbia X Roads, R. 

D. No. 63. 
Dudley Lewis, Columbia X Roads. 
Eva M. Voorhis, Wellsburg, No. 55, 
N. Y. 
Every Saturday evening. Grange 
Hall. 

SPRING HILL, 178. 

L. S. Tyler, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 

N. D. Snyder, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 

D N. Warner, Laceyville, Wyoming 

Co., R. D. No. 36. 

Every Saturday evening, Grange 

Hall. ^ 

^ TROY, 182. 

Meade Thomas, Troy. 
E. C. Ely. Troy. ' 

Miss Lena Kennedy, Trt5y, R. D. No. 
64. 
Every Saturday afternoon. Grange 
Hall. 

TOWANDA VALLEY, 204. 

T. S. Wilcox. Granville Summit, R. D. 

No. 69. 
Mrs. F. X. Dodge, Powell, R. Pj D. 

No. 49. 
A. C. Smith, Burlington, R. D. No. 50. 
Every Saturday evening. Grange 
Hall. 

NEW ALBANY, 205. 

J. J. Lyman, New Albany. 

Mable Rhodes, New. Albany. 

G. E. Ayer, New Albany. 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings. P. O. S. of A. Hall. 



SMITHFIELD, 214. 

H. E. Jakeman, Milan, R. D. No. 22; 
Collen Wood, E. Smithfield. 
D. G. Smith. E. Smithfield. 

First and third Thursdays, Grang* 

Hall. 

LINCOLN, 237. 

Prank Campbell, Wellsburg, R. IX 

No. 1. N. Y. 
Mrs. Frank Campbell, Wellsburg, R. 

D. No. 1, N. Y. 
Frank Dewey. Chemung, R. D. No. 5B. 
Every Tuesday evening, Bently 
Creek. 

WEST GRANVILLE, 257. 

J. D. Bunyan, Canton. 

J. W. Duart. Canton. 

Mrs. B. L. Fleming, Granville Summit* 

Every Saturday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

lONA, 272. 

Asa S. Stevens, Towanda* R. D. No. 8» 
Lucy M. Stevens, Towanda, R. D. No, 

8. 
D, A. Strope, Towanda, R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — Asa S. Stevens, Towanda, R. I>. 
No. 8. 
Saturdays, 2 and 7 o'clock p. m^ 
Grange Hall. 

GRANVILLE CENTRE, 309. 

Wilber Baxter, Granville Summit, R, 

D. No. 68. 
Anna Baxter, Granville Summit, R. 

D. No. 68. 
Encell Taylor, Granville Summit, R. 
D. No. 68. 
Wednesday afternoons, winter; eve^ 
ning. summer, Grange Hall. 

BEECH FLATS, 336. 

R. H. Wright, Canton. R. D. No. 74. 
Frances E. Williams, Canton, R. IX 

No. 74. 
Jennie E. Fitzwater, Canton, R. IX 
No. 74. 
Friday evening. Grange Hall. 

STANDING STONE, 354. 

W. B. Taylor, Standing Stone. 

Joseph Stalford, Standing Stone. 

D. N. Vankuren, Rummerfleld. 

First and third Saturdays, 2 p m.; 
second and fourth Saturdays even- 
ing. Grange Hall. 

WILMOT, 512. 

H. W. Arey, Wyalusing, R. D. No. 41. 
John Snyder, Sugar Run. R. D. No. 43. 
Elmer G. Arey, Wyalusing, R. D. No. 

41. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Every Thursday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

KEYSTONE, 754. 

J. W. Ketcham, Canton. R. D. No. 71. 
C. B. Taylor, Canton, R. D. No. 71. 
Mrs. Jennie Bunyon, Canton, R. D. 
No. 71. 

First and third Friday evenings. 

Grange Hall. 



BUCKS. 



ARMENIA. 883. 

C. H. Becker, Troy, R. D. No. 65. 

Samuel Wood, Troy, R. D. No. 65. 

Theodore Smith, Troy. R. D. No. 65. 
First and third Saturday after- 
noons. Grange Hall. 

GILIiETT, 884. 

Arthur Chase, Gillett. 
Mary Voorhis. Gillett. 
John H. Chase, Gillett. 

Every Thusrday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

LAUREL HILL, 1161. 

J. D. Elsbree, Milan. R. D. No. 22. 
Lottie Havens, Milan, R. D. No. 22. 
Claude Elsbee, Milan, R. D. No. 22. 
P. A. — P. R. West, Milan, R. D. No.22. 
Every Tue;Sday evening, Hall, 



OVERSHOT. 1228. 



D. 



Thomas Flannery, Towanda, R 

No. 2. . 
33. O. Sullivan, Towanda, R. D. No. 2. 
Miss Mary Lynch. Towanda, R. D. 
No. 2. 
Every second Thursday evening, D> 
O. Sullivan's Hall. 

OVERTON, 1229. 

Arvilla Garner, New Albany, R. D. 
Mrs. G. L. Bower. Overton, 
Ulysses Travis, New Albany. 
, Every Thursday evening, K. O. T.M. 
Hall. 

NORTH ORWELL, 1280. 

E, E. Chubbuck, Rome. 
P. L. Osborne, Nichols. 
Cora Cass, Rome. 

Every Saturday evening. 

Hall. 



Union 



EASTERN BRADFORD. 1300. 

L. W, Pratt, LeRaysville. 
L, A. Wood, LeRaysville. 
Howell Powell, LeRaysville. 

ENTERPRISE, 1302^ 

I. W. Caswell, Rummerfield. 
J. A. Biles, Homets Ferry. 
C M. Homet, Homets Ferry. 



BUCKS 

EXCELSIOR, 379. 

"Samuel Hart, Doylestown, 
Alfred Paschall, Doylestown. 
Martha E. Lovett. Doylestown. 
Tuesday on or before full moon. 

CARVERSVILLE. 451. 

Hon. Hampton W. Rice, Solebury. 
Agnes S. Ely, Solebury. 
Emma L. Rice, Solebury. 

Tuesday, on or before full moon, 

homes of members. 



PINEVILLE, 507. 

Horace T. Smith, Bucfcmanville. 
Mrs. Alice Smith, Wycombe. 
Miss Jennie S. Briggs, Buckmanvllle. 
P. A. — B. Palmer Tomlinson, Buck- 
manvllle. 

First Monday on or ^before full 

moon, homes of members." 

MIDDLETOWN, 684. 

Samuel Hibbs, Hulmville. 
Anna M, Row, Langhorne. 
Mary T. N. Hibbs, Langhorne. 

Wednesday on or before full moon, 

Hibb's Hall. 

EDGEWOOD. 688, 

M. Palmer Rich, Woodbourne. 
Ella A. Wilson, Newtown. ' 
Susanna Rich, Woodbourne. 

First Monday, M. Palmer Rich'g. 

FRANKLIN, 998. 

O. B. Fackenthall. Springtown. 
Annie M. Cawley, Springtown. 
W. H. Weamer, Springtown. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

RICHLAND, 1206. 

James Weirbach, Richland Cehtr*. 
Melvina Johnson. Quakertown, 
Harry S. Johnson, Quakertown', 

Every Monday evening,Grange Hall. 

MT. CHESTNUT, 133. 

Frank Blinn, Prospect, R. D. No. 44. 
Jacob Albert. Prospect, R. D. No. 44. 
Emily Bryan, Prospect, R. D. No. 44, 

box 35. 
P. A. — Emily Brvan, Prospect, R. D. 
No. 44. box 35. 
Second and fourth r.londay even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

EUREKA, 244. 

S. L. Raisley, Butler, R. D. No. 10. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Raisley, Butler. 
J. .M. Raisley, Butler. 

First and third Monday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

FOREST, 370. 

N. F. Eartley, Euclid. 
Rev. J. S, Pittinger, Euclid. 
R. C. Thompson, Euclid. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings. 

Grange Hall. 

CONCORD, 570. 

J. L. Cumberland, Karns City, R. D. 

No. 74. 
W. H. Campbell, West Sunbury, R. D. 

No. 48. 
Mrs. M. J. Bryan. Karns City, R. D. 
No. 74. 
First and third Tuesdays, Grange 
Hall. 

CRANBERRY, 908. 

W. W. Vandivort, Callcry. 
F. West, Gallery. 

A. M. Covert, Evans City, R. D. 
No. 33. 

Last Friday on or before full moon. 

Grange Hall. 



CAMBRIA. 



WINFIELD, 1105. 

J. B. Bricker, Carbon Black, R. D. 

No. 17. 
H. L. Roenigh. Carbon Black, R. D. 

No. 17. 
Geo. H. Bicker, Carbon Black, R. D. 

No. 17. 
Alternate Fridays, Grange Hall. 



CAMBRIA 



BANNER. 1115. 

M. G. Dumm, Bradley Junction, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Thad. Jones, Bradley Junction, R. D. 

No. 1. ' 
F. J. Strittmatter, Bradley Junction, 
R. D. No. 1. 
First and third Wednesday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

CAMBRIA, 1116. 

B. W. Parrish, Oresson, 

T. W. Hughes. Cresson. 

Miss Martha McMullen, Cresson. 
Winter, first and third -Saturdays, 
1:30, p. m.; summer, Friday eve- 
nings, Grange Hall. 

MUNSTER, 1117. 

J. W. Griffin,- Cresson. R. D. 
Geo. W. Garrett, Cresson, R. D. 
George A. O'Hara, Cresson. R. D. 
Every Saturday afternoon — Munster 

ENTERPRISE, 1118. 

Richard Ivory, Loretto, R. D. 
Edward J. Weise. Cresson. 
Margaret M. Callen, Cresson. 

Every Thursday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

BUCKHORN, 1119. 

Lyman Sherbine, Wilmore. 
. John Wright. Wilmore. 
Val. Cramer, Portage, <m 

Second and last Thursday evenings, 

Crum House. 

. «MT. IIERMON, 1120. 

John G. Griffith, Edensburg, 
Harvey Evans, Edensburg, 
Leighton Rowland, Edensburg. 
(grange Hall. 

BARR, 1121 

Peter Lieb, Nicktown, 

Sylvester Kirsch. Carrolltown, R. D. 

No. 1. 
I. J. Kirsch, Carrolltown, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — Joseph Lieb, Nicktown. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

BLACK LICK, 1122. 

W. L. Crawford, Pindleton. 
Ellsworth Rowland, Pindleton. 
J. T. Crawford, Pindleton. 

First Saturday evening, Pindleton. 



HIGHLAND, 1123. 

I. J. Hughes, Wilmore, R. D. No. 1. 
J. H. Diamond, Wilmore, R, D. No. 1. 
D. W, Jones, Wilmore. R. D, No. 1. 
First Monday, school house. 

CROSS ROADS, 1124 

John A. Bearer, Hastings. 

Wm. Westrick, Patton. R. D. No. 2. 

F. J. Hertzog, Carroltown. 

First and third Tuesdays, Grange 

Hall. 

CONCORD, 1125. 

C, K, Grossman, Chest Springs. 
P. C. Strittmatter. Patton. 
I, T. Strittmatter, Patton. 

Every Monday evening. Grange Hall 

EMPIRE, 1226. 

J. E. Tomlinson, Bradley Junction. 
Erhart Farabaugh, Loretto. 
Edward Farabaugh, Loretto, 

First and third ' Fridays, Grange 

Hall. 

VAN ORMER, 1127. 

W. H .Beers, Fallen Timber. 

J. B. McManamy, Van Ormer. 

John Krise, Fallen Timber. 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings. Van Ormer. 

ST. AUGUSTINE, 1128. 

Charles Carl, Dys"art, R .D. No. 1. 

F. C. Nagle, Patton. R. D. No. 1. 

Rose Carl, Dysart, R. D. No. 1. 

Second and fourth Friday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

FLINTON, 1129. 

G H. Shidler, Flinton. 

J. I. Esch. Flinton. 

Miss Sallie Gates, Coalport, 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings, Beaver Valley. 

» FAIRVIEW, 1135. 

Allen MoCoy, Chest Springs. 

J. S. MoCoy, CJiest Springs, 

E. A. Sheehan, Loretto, R. D. Box 33. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 

MINERAL POINT, 1162. 

Clarence L. Reighard, Mineral Point, 
Floyd Walters, Mineral Point. 
Wallace J. Shaffer, Mineral Point. 
P. A. — Emanuel Reighard, Mineral 
Point. V 

Every Tuesday evening, M. P. 

Stock Go's Hall. 

BEECH GROVE, 1165. 

Jos. W. Dishart, Patton, R. D. No. 1. 

Thomas Davis. Patton, R. D. No. 1. 

Bessie Ragan, Patton, R. D. No. 1. 

P. A. — Jos. W. Dishart, Patton, R. D. 
No, 1. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings. Grange Hall, 



CARBON. CENTRE. 



ST. LAWRENCE, 1168. 

F. X. Yahner, St. Lawrence. 
Jacob Warner, St. Lawrencfe. 
Lemon C. Gill, St, Lawrence. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

St. Lawrence. 



CARBON 



HUDSONDAIiE, 1032. 

Wm. T. EroTi, Weatherly. 
R. A. Eroh, Weatherly. 
Brice Brenkman, Weatherly, R. D. 
No. 1. 

Saturday before full moon, U S. S. 
Chapel. 



m 



CENTRE 



PROGRESS, 96. 

N. B. Schaffer, Centre Hall. 

Leonard Rhone, Centre Hall. 

D. K. Keller, Centre Hall. 

Saturday on or before full m,oon 
and two weeks after, 1 p. m., 
Grange Arcadia. 

BENNER, 107. 

Wnf. Tressler, Bellefonte. 
Anna Tressler, Bellefonte, 
Florence Marshall, State College, R.D. 
No. 2. ■.....; 

Wednesday evening on or before 
full moon. Grange Hall. 

liOGAN, 109. ^^ 

Wallace S. White, Bellefonte, R. D. 
Mrs. Blanche E. Musser, Bellefonte, 

R. D. 
W. F. Musser, Bellefonte, R. D.. 
First and third Saturdays, Grange 
Hall. 

BAIiD EAGLE, 151. 

Henry Heaton, Rowland, R. D. 

Jas. Lingle, Milesburg. 

Geo. Noll, Milesburg. 

George Noll, Milesburg. 

First and third Saturdays, Miles- 
burg. 

WASHINGTON 157. 

Dr. H. A. Surface, State College. 

Thos. I. Mairs, State College. 

W. E. Stover, State College, R. D. 

No. 1. 
P. A. — W. K. Corl, State College. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 

SPRING MILLS, 158. 

M. L. Rishel, Spring Mills, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Jas. A. McClintic, Spring Mills, R. D. 

No. 1. 
A. J. Shook, Spring Mills, R. D. No. 1. 
First and third Saturdays, Spring 
Mills. 



VICTOR, 159. 

D. A. Grove, State College, R. D. 
Miss Anna Dale, Oak Hall Station. 
Jas. C. Gilliland, Oak Hall Station. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

PROVIDENCE, 217. 

H. E. Duck, Millheim, 

C. Alexander, Millheim. 

A. J. Gephart, Millheim. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Mill- 
heim. , 
MARION, 223. 

J. W. Orr, Nittany, R. D. . 

C. S. Garbrick, Zion. R. D. 
Geo. M. Harter, Nittany, R. D. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Second and fourth Sat^irday even- 
ings, Hall in Jacksonville. 

CENTRE, 254. 

W. H. Goss, Penn'a. Furnace, Hunt- 
ingdon Co., R. D. No. 1. 
Miss Sue Dannley, Pine Grove Mills. 
A. J. Tate, Pine Grove Mills. 

First and third Wdenesdays, Pine 
, Grove Mills. 

HALF MOON, 290. 

Geo. L. Ebbs, Warrior's Mark, Hunt- 
ingdon Co., R. D. No. 2. 
Mrs. Geo, L. Ebbs, Warrior's Mark, 

Huntingdon Co., R. D. No. 2. 
Geo. W.Fisher, Warrior's Mark, Hunt- 
ingdon Co., R. D. No. 2. 
Second and last Saturday, 2 p. <m.. 
Grange Hall. 

FAIRVIEW, 296, 

Marcelliis A. - Sankey, Spring Mills, 
R. D. No. 3, box 87. 

D. R. Sweetwood, Spring Mills, R. D. 

No. 3, box 87. 
J. M. Carson, Potter's Mills. 

Second and last Saturdays, Spruce- 
town. 

HOWARD, 297. 

David B. Schenck, Howard. 
J. N. Hall, Howard. 
Henry J. Fletcher, Howard. 
P. A. — Mary A. Fletcher, Howard. 
Second and last Saturdays, Howard. 

UNION, 325. 

Harvey Hoover, Fleming, 
S. K. Emerick, Fleming. 
R. T. Comley, Fleming. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall, Unionville. 

WALKER, 345. 

J. D, Miller, Hublersburg. 

Mrs. J. H. earner, Hublersburg. 

Miss Ethel Miller, Hublersburg. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

ZION, 757. 

J. A. Hoy- Zion. j-^' 

H. Struble> Zion. 

H. l; Truckenmiller, Zion. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, Grange Hall, 



10 



CHESTER. 



OAK GROVE, 761. 

C. C. Johnstonbaugh, Roland. 
James A. Bartley, Zion. 

Mrs. Clark Carson, Bellefonte. 

LEONARD, 779. 

Thomas Gray, Penn'a. Furnace, Hunt- 
ingdon Co. 
Boston Campbell, Penn'a. Furnace, 

Huntingdon Co. 
Harry Koch, Penn'a. Furnace, Hunt- 
ingdon Co. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Rock 
Springs. 

GOODWIIili, 1050. 

J. M. Orndorf, Woodward. 
M. F. Hess, Fiedler. 
A. A. Stover, Fiedler. 
P. A. — J. W. Winkleblech, Fiedler. 
Second Tuesday, Grange Hall. 

MHiES, 1051. 

R. D. Beirly, Rebersburg. 
Mrs. Chas. Beirly, Rebersburg. 

A. N. Corman, Rebersburg. 

MADISON. 1053. 

B. W. Shaffer, Madisonburg. 

B. F. Miller, Madisonburg. 
J. H. Roush, Madisonburg. 

First Saturday, Madisonburg. 
ROMOLiA, 1192. 

J. E. Yeager, Howard, R. D. No. 1. 
John A. Daley, Howard, R. D .No. 1. 

D. E. Robb, Howard, R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — (Secretary. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 
Grange Hall. 

MOSHANNON, 1272. 

C. C. Hess, Philipsburg. 
Frank Waring, Philipsburg. 
Cora Kinkead, Philipsburg. 

First and third Friday evenings, 
G. A. R. Hall. 

PORT MATILDA, 1284. 

James P. Goss, Port Matilda. 
Anna M. Goss, Port Matilda. 
R. D. Ardry, Martha Furnace. 

Two p. m., K. G. E. Hall, Port 

Matilda. 

CHESTER 

KENNETT, 19. 

Willard Cloud, Norway. 

Mary S. Parker, Parkersville. 

Lillian E. Cloud, Norway. 

Wednesday on or before full moon, 
and two weeks after, Kennett 
Square. 

BRANDYWINE, 60. 

Samuel E. Howell, West Chester. 

Margaret Sharpless, West Chester. 

Mayme Ring Little, West Chester. 

P. A. — Wm. G. Embree, West Chester. 
Saturday on or before full moon 
and Wednesday night week after, 
Grange Hall. 



LONDON GROVE, 63. 

Thos. L. Passmore, Chatham. 

Mary M. Wood, Avondale. 

Elizabeth B. Pusey, Avondale. 

Thursday on or before full moon 
and two weeks after, Avondale. 

OXFORD, 67. 

L. J. Lyons, Lincoln University. 

Mrs. R. Anna Webb, Lincoln Unl-i 

versity. 
Katie Toot, Lincoln University. 

First and fourth Friday evenings, 

Lincoln University. 

RUSSELVILLE, 91. 

Wm. Webster, Russelville. 

E. S. Marsh, Elkview. 

Anna C. Martin, Cqchranville. 

P. A. — .E. S. Marsh, Elkview. 

Thursday evening on or before full 
moon and two weeks after, Grange 
Hall. 

GOSHEN, 121. 

Harry F. Taylor, Malvern. 

Esther W. Pratt, West Chester, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Elizabeth H. Hicks, West Chester, R. 

D. No. 2. 
P. A. — ^Wm. H. Hicks, West Chester, 
R. D. No. 2. 
Thursday evening on or before full 
moon and two weeks after, Goshen- 
ville. 

FRANKLIN, 141. 

Thos. B. Hoops, Landenberg. 

Chas. Sharpless, West Grove. 

S. E. Nivin, Landenberg. 

Tuesday evening on or before full 
moon, residence Alfred Sharpless. 

HIGHLAND, 980. 

Harvey W. Reed, Cochranville. 
Wm B. Coates, Cochranville. R. D. 
No. 4. 
. Fred J. Coates, Cochranville. 
P. A. — Clem Bunn, Parkersburg. 
Every Tuesday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

SADSBURY. 1085. 

E. F. Firth, Sadsburyville. 

Mrs. C. K. Paxson, Parkesburg. 

Miss Mary Dick, Parkesburg. 

P. A. — Wm. L. Paxson, Parkesburg. 

Friday evening on or before full 

moon, Sadsburyville. 

LYNDELL, 1179. 

W. D. Marshall, Lyndell. 
Mrs. Warren Moore, Uwchlan. 
Mame McCausland, Lyndell. 
Monday evening, Lyndell Hall. 

FOX CROB^r, 1220. 

R. E. Ramsey, Embreeville, R. D. 
No. 2. 

J. C. Valentine, Cain. 

Miss Addie Warren, E. Downingtown. 
Tuesday evening on or before full' 
moon and two weeks after, Fox 
Croft. 



11 



CLARION-CLEARFICLD. 



: ■ I I 



iii 



JEAST LYNN, 1263. 

C. Percy Barnard, North Brook. 

Bertha Webb, Uniohville. 

Lillie T. Michener, North Brook. 

P. A. — Powell Webb, Unionville. 

Tuesday evening on or before full 
moon and two weeks after, Union- 
ville. 

DOE RUN, 1269. 

E. Ralph Baker, Pomeroy. 

Anna W. Moore, Chatham, R. D. No.l. 

Marian L. Skelton, Chatham, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Wednesday evening on or before 
full moon, and in winter two weeks 

UWCHLAND, 1298, 

Wayne Smedley, Linville. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Prye Phipps, Linville. 

Mrs. Carrie Dauman, Linville. 

KIMBERTON, 1304. 

John Gyger, Kimberton. 
Daniel W. Gyger, Kimberton, 
Mrs. J. K. Funk, Kimberton. 



CLARION 



BEAVER, 415. 

C. E. Alt, Church. 

J. S. Wentling, Church. 

W. E. Hugus, Church. 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings, Wentling's Corners. 

ASBURY, 563. 

M. A. Showers, Waterson. 
Will H. Jordon, Day. 
P. S. Ion, Day. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

LEATHERWOOD, 62^. 

Grant Phillips, New Bethlehem. 

D. G. Shoemaker, New Bethlehem. 
Mrs. W. H. Kelly, Lawsonham. 

First and third Fridays, Piollett. 

LIMESTONE, 654. 

B. B. Ferguson, New Bethlehem. 

C. T. Allison, Limestone. 

Mrs. D. H. Parsons, New Bethlehem, 
R. D. No. 3. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Lime- 
stone. 

MAPLE GROVE, 680. 

C. G. Cyphert, Kingsville. 
A. E. Amsler, Kingsville. 
J. P. Eaker, Limestone. 

First and third Thursdays, Grange 

Hall. 

MURPHEY, 735. 

Mrs. Rose E. Callen, Sligo, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. P. M. Smith, Sligo, R. D. No. 1. 

E. L. Over, Sligo, R. D. No. 3, box 39. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

First Saturday 1 p. m., third Friday 
evening, Grange Hall. 



12 



ASHLAND, 1019. 

H. M. Hess, Fern. 
J. H. Martin, Knox, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. J. H. Martin, Knox, R. D. No. 1. 
First Saturday, Grange Hall. 

MIOLA, 1101. 

J. F. McClaine. Miola. 
Eddie H. DeVilder, Miola. 
J. E. Mahle, Miola. 

Second and fourth Tuesdays, 

Grange Hall. 

FLEMING, 1221. 

Ed. M. MoEntire, Frampton. 
Hayes Kuhns, Reidsburg. 
Mrs. Hayes Kuhns, Reidsburg. 
7:30, p. m., McChansville. 

PERRY, 1235. 

M. S. Stewart, Parker's Landing, R.D. 

No. 2, Armstrong Co. 
Wm. Yingling, Parker's Landing, R.D. 

No. 2, Armstrong Co. 
R. P. Graham, Parker's Landing, R.D. 

No. 2, Armstrong Co. 
P. A. — D. R. Elliott.Parker's Landing, 

R. D. No. 2, Armstrong Co. 
■ Second and fourth Tuesday even- 
ings, I. O. O. F. Hall. 

CALLENSBURG, 1273. 

John C. Elliott, Callensburg. 

Mrs. A. R. Pollock, Parker's Landing, 

R. D. No. 1, Armstrong Co. 
D. E. Elliott, Callensburg. 
P. A. — W. C. Price, Parker's Landing, 
Armstrong Co. 
First and second Tuesday,!. O. O. P. 
Hall. 



CLEARFIELD 



LAWRENCE, 533. 

A. C. Read, Clearfield. 

Mrs. A. C. Read, Clearfield. 

C. B. McCracken, Clearfield. 

First Saturday and Thursday fol- 
lowing second Saturday, Grange 
Hall. 

PENN, 534. 

Seymour L. Kester, Grampian. 
Mrs. Vinnie Thorp, Grampian. 
Mrs. Sallie Wall, Grampian. 

Second and last Saturday, 2 p. m., 

McGraph Hall. 

MT. JOY, 584. 

J. B. Ogden, Clearfield. 
Blake Owens, Clearfield. 
Roy Fulton. Clearfield. 

Second and last Friday evenings, 

Mt. Joy. 

GOSHEN, 623. 

Josiah R. Read, Clearfield. 
W. H. Liddle, Clearfield. 
Mrs. W. H. Liddle , Clearfield. 

First and third Fridays, Grange 

Hall. 



CLEARFIELD. 



GREENWOOD, 706. 

Jas. T. Mitchell, MahafCey, R. D. 
A. Campbell, MahafCey, R. D. 
G. W. Campbell, Curry Run. 

First and third Saturday, Bower 

School House. 

OAK HILL, 717. 

Geo. W. Rees, Keewaydin. 
Jas. W. Michaels, Karthaus. 
W. J. Kopp, Karthaus. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

First and third Saturdays, 2 p. m., 

Karthaus. 

JORDON, 758. 

John A. Pierce, McCartney. 
E. E. Garman, Berwindale. 
Nelson A. Hunter, Irvona. 

First and second Saturdays, Anson- 
ville. 

GIRARD, 788. 

Bowman Smith, Odessa. 
Paul Smith, LeCont's Mills. 
Bertha Bungament, Odessa. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Gilliham. 

UNION, 802. 

W. B. Duff, Rockton. 

Alfred Wells, Rockton. 

A. E. Wells, Rockton. 

P. A. — Alfred Wells, Rockton. 

First and third Saturday afternoon, 
winter; evening, summer, P. O. S. 
of A. Hall. 

DUBOIS, 808. 

J. I. Pentz, DuBois, R. D. No. 2. 
S. C. Liddle, DuBois, R. D. No. 2. 
W. C. Dunlap, DuBois, R. D. No. 2. 

First and third Friday evenings. 

Grange Hall. 

MOUNTAIN SUMMIT, 843. 

Daniel Waltz, Ramey. 
John C. Mullen, Ramey. 
E. C. Davis, Ramey. 

Last Thursday evening, P. O. S. of 

A. Hall. 

CENTER HILL, 885. 

Cyrus Williams, Sington. 
Josiah M. Evans, Sington. 
J. H. Williams, Sington. 

Second and fourth Saturday 

Grange Hall. 

SALEM, 964. 

J. H. Hayes, Luthersburg. 
J. H. Edinger, Luthersburg. 
Miss Belle Postlethwaite, DuBois, R. 
D. No. 1. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

MT. PLEASANT. 975. 

Dr. B. T. Strunk, Utahville. 

P. S. Dotts, Glenhope. 

D. A. McFarland, Utahville. 

Second and last Thursdays, Wil- 
liam's Hall. 



SUSQUEHANNA. 1145. 

David Way, Curwensvllle. 

Hannah Way, Curwensvllle. 

Nora R. Pyle, Curwensvllle. 

First and third Saturdays, Cur- 
wensvllle. 

KERRMOOR, 1146. 

Perry Straw, Kerrmoor, R. D. No. 1. 
J. H. Ferguson, Kerrmoor, R. D. No.2. 
John Tubbs, Kerrmoor, R. D. No. 2. 

Second and fourth Saturdays. 2 p. 

m., Grange Hall. 

HARMONY, 1201. 

N. B. Young, MahafCey, R. D. 

Venna A. Fry, Westover. 

H. M. Fry, Westover. 

P. A. — L. W. Roland, Westover. 

First and third Fridays, Grange 

Hall. 

BRADY, 1218. 

S. G. Kuntz, Troutville. 

W. F. Buchheit, Sykesville. 

W. E. Davis, Troutville. 

Second and fourth Wednesday eve- 
nings. Grange Hall. 

BRADFORD, 1219. 

J. R. Wilson, Woodland. 
C. H. Shivery, Shawsville. 
Mrs. J. R. Wilson, Woodland. 

First and third Wednesdays, Grange 

Hall. 

HOME CAMP. 1222. 

E. J. Cunningham, Home Camp. 
E. G. Brubaker, Home Camp. 
Q. E. Dressier, Home Camp. 

Second 'and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m.. Home Camp. 

PENFIELD, 1240. 

A. M. Spotts, Penfleld. 

Catharine E. Woodward, Penfleld. 

Geo. R .Woodward, Penfleld. 

First and third Friday evenings, 

I. O. O. F. Hall. 

McGEE, 1241. 

W. R. Reitz, Newtenburgh. 

Foster Donahue, Newtenburgh. 

Jane Campbell, MahafCey, R. D. No. 4. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Mc- 

Gee's Hall. 

GLEN HOPE, 1277. 

F. M .Dunlap, Ventland. 
L. A. Stiles, Glen Hope. 
W. Davis, Glen Hope. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Hall. 

NEW WASHINGTON, 1283. 

J. H. Weaver. MahafCey, R. D. No. 4. 

W. B. Hurd, LaJose. 

D. T. Mitchell, Jr., MahafCey, R. D. 
No. 4. 

P. A. — John Haag, New Washington. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Rose Hall. 



13 



CLINTON-COLUMBIA, 



■ m 



HICKORY, 1285. 

T. C. Hoyt, Penfield. 
S. D. Keller, Penfield. 
Alice Keller. Penfield. 

First and third Tuesday evenings, 

Hickory. 



CLINTON 



LAMAR, 274. 

A. F. Sweely, Mackeyville. 
J. A. Herr, Mill Hall. 
Samuel Boob. Salona. 

Every Saturday evening, Salona. 

BAIiD EAGIiE, 303. 

W. H. H. WelcTi, Mill Hall. 
J. M. Williams, Floral. 
John S. Bossert, Mill Hall. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Brown's School House. 

NITTANY, 334. 

W. H. Dornblaser, Lamar. 
M. A. Rishel, Clintondale. 
Ira C. Segner, Lamar. 

First and third Saturday evenings. 

Watson's Hall. ^ 

BEECH CREEK, 378. 

Albert E. Loomis, Beech Creek, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. D. Q. Mapes, Beech Creek- 
Mrs. Geo. Peters, Beech Creek. 

First and third Saturdays, 2 p. m., 
Mobley Hall, Beech Creek. 

CHATHAM'S RUN, 1189. 

A. T. Baird, Island. 

C. H. Rich, Woolrich. 

O. E. Glise. Island. 

Second and fourth Wednesday eve- 
nings, P. O. S. of A. Hall. 

MOUNTAIN, 1215. 

David B. Long, Renovo. 
E. T. Fleming, Renovo. 
Florence Reid, Renovo. 

Second Friday, I. O. O. F. Hall, 

Sixth Street. 

RIVERSIDE, 1255. 

Clarence C. Ricker, McElTiatten. 
Geo. S. McGuire. McElhatten. 
A. B. Winchester, McElhatten. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Second and last Thursday evenings, 

C. C. Ricker's. 

WOODWARD, 1267. 

Daniel Robb, Lock Haven. 
Archie Probst, Lock Haven. 
H. S. Bollinger. Lock Haven. 

Second and fourth Tuesdays, I. O, 

O. F. Hall. 



14 



COLUMBIA 

LIGHT STREET, 31. 

H. H. Brown, Light Street, R. D. No.l. 
Harvy J. Little, Light Street. R. D. 

No. 1. 
Eber A. Brown, Light Street, R. D. 

No. 1, box 45. 
P. A. — H. H. Brown, Light Street. 
Second and fourth Fridays, Grange 
Hall. 

COLUMBIA, 46. 

C. W. Tost, Stillwater, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. Clara Creveling, Forks, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Lloyd Wilson, Forks, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — ^O. J. Hess, Stillwater. 

Saturdays, 2 p. m., Bendertown. 

THE VALLEY, 52. 

Cyrus Demott, Millville. 

Sarah Ikler, Millville. 

Grace Eves, Millville. 

Second and last Saturdays, Mill- 
ville. 

CENTRE, 56. 

Frank C. Harris, Light Street, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. A. C. Creasy. Light Street, R. D. 

No. 1. 
J. H. Aikman, Light Street, R. D. 

No, 1. 
P. A. — A. C. Creasy, Light Street, R. 
D. No. 1. 
Every Friday evening. Grange 
Hall. 

BENTON, 88. 

Samuel R. Kline, Benton, R. D. No. 1. 
A. W. Drescher, Benton, R. D. No. 1. 
F. I. Shultz, Benton, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — W. S. Laubach, Benton, R. D. 
No. 2. 

First and third Saturdays, P. O. S. 

of A. Hall. 

SUGARLOAF, 105. 

A. R. Smith. Benton, R. D. No. 2. 
J, P. Laubach, Fairmount Springs, 
Luzerne Co. 

D. M. Hess, Fairmount Springs, Lu- 

zerne Co. 
First and third Saturdays, Grange 
Hall. 

ROHBSBURG. 108. 

J. S. Campbell, Orangeville, R. J^. 
Miss Bertha Shaffer, Rohrsburg, R. D. 
Miss Helen Reece, Rohrsburg, R. I>. 
P. A. — W. W. Parker, Rohrsburg,R.D. 

First and third SaturdaVis, Black's 

Hall. 

ORANGE, 128. 

E. H. Sloan. Orangeville. 
Geo. S. Welsh, Orangeville. 
Mrs. E. H. Sloan, Orangeville. 

P. A. — Wm. Hagenbuch, Orangeville. 
Second and last Saturdays, 2 p. m., 
Orangeville. 

OATAWISSA, 216. 

Hon. Wm. T. Creasy, Catawissa. 

F. P. Creasy, Catawissa. 



CRAWFORD. 



C. W. Creasy, Catawissa, 

Second and fourth Saturdays, resi- 
dence of W. T. Creasy. 

LOCUST, 248. 

Daniel Lindemuth, Newlin. 
Samuel Reinbold, Newlin. 
A. B. Walter, Newlin. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Alternate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

BLOOMSBURG, 322. 

H. G. Supplee, Bloomsburg. 

Wm. Mensch, Rupert. 

W. J. Beidleman, Bloomsburg. 

Every Saturday evening, Furman's 

Hall. 

HEMLOCK. 525. 

P. A. Stroup, Buckhorn. 

C. F. Girton, Bloomsburg, R. D. No. 1. 

E. J. Ohl. Bloomsburg, R. D. 



CRAWFORD 



SPARTA, 110. 

Charles Thompson, Spartansburg. 

Mrs. Geo. Conover, Spartansburg. 

Mrs. O. P. Blakeslee, Spartansburg. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Ma- 
sonic Hall. 

RICHMOND, 135. 

Irvin M. Sabin, Randolph. 
Rose Sabin, Randolph. 
Eva C. Winton, Randolph. 

First and third Saturdays, I. O. O.F. 

Hall. 

SHAW'S LANDING, 164. 

Charles Herrington, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 6. 
Mrs. Charles Herrington, Meadville, 

R. D. No. 6. 
Dora Powell, Cochranton. 

Altfernate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

CAMBRIDGE, 168. 

Joseph Hutson, Miller's Station. 
D. Anna Perkins, Miller's Station. 
Walter R. Tucker, Cambridge Springs. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Alternate Saturdays, Jan 6, etc.. 

Grange Hall. 

RANDOLPH, 190. 

P. M. Cutshall, Randolph. 

Mrs. Katie McLaughlin, Blooming 

Valley. 
Mrs. Florence Byham, Guy's Mills. 
P. A. — W. L. Russel, Townville, R. D. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 10, a. 

m., Guy's Mills. 

SPRING, 263. 

C. W, Dauchey, Springboro. 
Mrs. Ida Nicolls, Gonneautville. 
Ray H. Sheldon, Springboro. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 



ATHENS, 304. 

W. D. McCrillis, Tryinville. 

J. C. Himebaugh, Centreville. 

Mrs. Annie Creacraft, Centreville. 
First and third Fridays, 10 a. m., 
winter; 1 p. m., summer. Grange 
Hall. 

ATLANTIC, 344. 

G. B. Hanna, Atlantic. 
C. F. Thayer, Atlantic. 
Caroline L. Waid. Atlantic. 
P. A. — C. F. Thayer, Atlantic. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 
McDowell's Hall. 

CENTER ROAD, 502. 

F. J. Kendall, Gonneautville, R. D. 

No. 30. 
Lyra Allen, Gonneautville, R. D. No. 

30. 
N. B. Graham, Linesville. 

First and third Saturdays, Conneaut 
Centre. 

DICKSONBURG, 556 

O. H. Fish, Gonneautville. 
Mrs. Myrtle A|oyer,' Linesville. 
Milton Sweet, Gonneautville. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Dicksonburg. 

LINESVILLE, 694. 

Wm. Waldrick, Linesville. 

Celia Terry, Linesville. 

Mrs. Mary Sloat, Linesville. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 

UNION, 764. 

H. A. Gachenbach, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 6. 
Andrew Kahler, Meadville, R. D. No.6. 
Miss Laura Ehrgott, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 7. 
P. A, — Geo. C. Reitz, Meadville, R. D. 
No. 7. 
First and third Saturday evenings, 
T. P. House. 

HAYFIELD, 800. 

A. J. Terrill, Cambridge Springs. 
Mrs. Sophia Eaton, iSaegertown, R. D. 
Mrs. Alice Hotchkiss, Saegertown, 
R. D. 
Alternate Saturday evenings,Grange 
Hall. 

EUREKA, 816. 

Wm. H. Watson. Saegertown, R. D. 

No. 10, box 43. 
Mrs. R. L. Gordon, Gonneautville, R. 

D. No. 33. 
Geo. S. Watson, Gonneautville, R. D. 

No. 33, box 56. 
?. A. — Secretary. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

BEAVER, 838. 

H. J. Hague, Shadeland. 

Mrs. Alice Thompson, Springboro, 

E. H. Hague, Gonneautville. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 



15 



CRAWFORD. 






NORTH SHENANGO CENTRAIi, 844. 

S. C. Quick, Espyville Station. 

Mrs. Nettie Clark, Espyville Station. 

Mrs. Oma Quick, Epsyville Station. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, 1 
p. m., winter; 8 p. m. summer, 
Grange Hall. 

STUBEN, 858. 

'Glenn J. Bunce, Troy Centre. 
Henry Buckley, Jr., Townville. 
Mrs. W. A. Bunce, Troy Centre. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, I. O. 

O. F. Hall. 

RUNDELIiS, 871. 

Mrs. Ella Frazier, Conneautville. 
Mrs! W. M. Rogers, Conneautville. 
Mrs. Anna Rundell, Conneautville. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 

SUMMERHILL, 880. 

F. M. Webster, Conneautville. 

Ida Webster, Conneautville. 

Mrs. Zoe Ford. Conneautville. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

WEST SHENANGO, 895. 

R. P. Marshall, Jamestown, Mercer 

Co. 
John Kuder, Turnersville. 
Mrs. J. E. Camp, Turnersville. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 
Hall. 

KEYSTONE, 901. 

W. A. Dearborne, Saegertown, R. D. 

No. 16. 
Addie Yunker, Meadville, R. D. No. 2. 
Corine Line, Meadville, R. D. No. 2. 

First and third Saturdays, Little 

Corners. 

VENANGO, 910. 

Chas. T. Homan, Cambridge Springs, 

R. D. 
Mrs. Agnes Torry, Cambridge Springs, 

R. D. 
W. A. Proper, Venango, R. D. No. 18. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, I. O. 
O. F. Hall. . . 

VERNON, 936. 

W. C. Williams, Meadville, R. D. No. 4. 
Alice Cook, Meadville, R. D. No. 4. 
Emmett A. Williams, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 4. 
Second and fourth Saturdays Ver- 
non Township. 

BLOOMFIEI/D, 958. 

Harvey Sexton, Union City, R. D., 

Erie Co. 
Mrs. Lillian King, Lincolnville. 
Milton Lafferty, Miller Station, R. D. 
p A Secretary 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Lin- 

colnville. 



FRENCH CREEK VAIiLEY, 988. 

C. E. Cropp, Meadville, R. D. No. 13. 
Mrs. Minnie Stull, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 13. 
Nevin E. Cole Meadville, R. D. No^ 1. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 

Grange Hall. 



WOOD COCK CENTRE, 1034. 

A. B. Wilson, Saegertown, R.D. No. 15. 
Georgiana George, Saegertown, R. D. 

No. 15. 
J. E. Balliet, Saegertown. 
P. A. — Marion George, Saegertown, R. 
D. No. 14. 
Alternate Tuesday evenings, Jan. 2, 
etc., Woodcock Centre. 

CONNEAUT LAI£E, 1102. 

E. T. Barber, Conneaut Lake. 

F. R. Heberling, Conneaut Lake. 
John N. Scott, Conneaut Lake. 

Fourth Fridays, K. O. T. M. Hall. 

CLOVERDALE, 1111. 

Hattie Price, Saegertown, R. D. No. 14. 
Daniel Smith, Saegertown, R. D. No. 

15. 
Laduff Greenlee, Cambridge Springs,, 
R. D. No. 19. 
Alternate Tuesday evenings. Grange 
Hall. 

HARMONY, 1112. 

Sanford Walton, Springboro. 

Mrs. Minnie Loucks, Beaver Centre. 

Ella J. Sllverthorn, Springboro. 

First and third Friday evenings, 

Beaver Centre. 

KISER HILL MEAD, 1177. 

Mrs. F. W. Smith, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 9. 
W. A. demons, Meadville, R.D. No.lO. 
M. Irene Mahood, Meadville R. 'D, 

No. 10. 
Alternate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

FRENCHTOWN, 1181. 

Joseph Brunot, Meadville, R.D. No.lO. 
Mrs. Herman Jenneratt, Meadville, R. 

D. No. 10. 
A. J. Duchanois, Meadville, R. D. 

No. 10. 
P. A. — Herman Jenneratt, Meadville, 
R. D. No. 10. 
Alternate Saturday, Jan. 6, etc., 
Frenchtown Hall. 

HARTSTOWN, 1233. 

J. C. Vickers, Hartstown. 
Wm. Dickey, Hartstown. 
Mayme DuMars, Hartstown. 

First and third Wednesday evening, 
Miller's Hall. 



16 



i 



CUMBERLAND-DAUPH1N-D£LAWAR£-ELK-ERI£ 



HYBETOWN, 1239. 

F. L. Arthurs, Hydetown, R.D. No. 88. 
Mrs. Eunice Cook, Troy Centre, R. 

D. No. 74. 
Miss Lizzie Archer, Hydetown, R. D. 
No. 88. 
First and third Saturday afternoons, 
Baker's Hall. 



CUMBERLAND 



CUMBERLAND, 16. 

R. H. Thomas, Jr., Mechanicsburg. 
Ira D. Coover, Mechanicsburg, 
H. S. Mohler, Mechanicsburg. 

Ffrst and third Mondays, Grange 

Hall. 

MONROE, 362. 

J. J. Zacharias, Mechanicsburg. 

H. B. Markley, Mechanicsburg. 

Mrs. Marietta Markley, Mechanics- 
First and third Mondays, J. T. 
Kast's. 



DAUPHIN 



PILLOW, 650. 

W. R. Heckert, Pillow. 

F. Li. Koppenhoffer, Berrysburg. 

Jonathan Dockey, Pillow. 

Third Saturday evening, Pillow. 



DELAWARE 



BETHEL, 851. 

G. Albert Hinkson, Boothwyn, R. D. 
Mary J. Zebley, Boothwyn, R. D. 
Carrie M. P. Talley, Brandywine Sum- 
mit, R. D. 

First and third Friday evenings, 

Bethel Hall. 

CONCORD, 1141. 

W. W. Hill, Markham. 
Horace Darlington, Darling. 
R. M. Heyburn, Ward. 
P. A. — Jos. H. Paschall, Brandywine 
Summit, R. D. No. 2. 

Second and fourth Monday nights, 

Concordville. 

BROOKHAVEN, 1173. 

George Regester, Media, R. D. No. 1. 

Bertha Hannum, Media, R. D. No. 1. 

A. M. Baker, Gradyville. 

P. A. — Jas. Miller, Wallingford. 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings. Borough Hall. 

BIRMINGHAM, 1231. 

Sellers Hoffman, Chadd's Ford. 
Ellen B. Barney, Chadd's Ford. 
Florence E. Baldwin. Chadd's Ford. 
Friday evenings, Chadd's Ford. 



NEWTOWN SQUARE, 1279. 

Herbert Getty, Manora. 
Jennie Vernon, Newtown Square. 
Anna A. Thomas, Newtown Square. 
P. A. — Edwin Supplee, Media, D. R. 
No. 2. 

First and third Mondays, New« 

town Square. 

VILLAGE GREEN, 1299. 

Alex. S. Way, Media, R. D. No. 2. 
Marie B .Nelling, Me4ia, R. D. No. 2V 
Laura D. Pancoast, Chester, R. I>^ 
No. 1. 



ELK 

KERSEY, 628. 

John Stevenson, Kersey. 
Geo. Foster, Kersey. 
Ethel Green, Kersey. 

Second and last Saturday, Grange 

Hall. 

SUMMIT, 1155. 

Joseph Kaiser, St. Marys. 
Edward J. Gregory, St. Marys. 
Clara M. Gregory, St. Marys. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 



BENNETTS BRANCH, 1174. 



i 



C. F. Taylor, Weedville. 
C. J. Spangler, Weedville. > '. 

R. L Spangler, Weedville. ,'• 

P. A. — R. I. Spangler, Weedville. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Weedville. 

SILVER VALLEY, 1178. 

Wolfgang Nicklas, St. Mary's, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Julia Mallison, St. Mary's R. D. No. 2. 
Louis P. Kerner, St. Mary's, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Second Saturday, school house. 

RASSELAS, 1187. 

Mrs. L. A. Pistner, Wilcox, R. D. No. I. 
Mrs. I^. M. Bonnert, Wilcox, R. D. 

No. 1. 
J. V. Bonnert, Wilcox, R. D. No. 1. 
Second Saturday evening, Grangft 
Hall. 

WINDFALL, 1230. 

Philip S. Renscher, St. Marys. 
Alios Feldbauer, St. Marys. 
Anthony Kriegel, St. Marys. 
First Saturday each 'month. 



^ 




m 



CORRY, 55.. 

Lee Perkins, Corry, R. D. No. 6. 
Mrs. Elma Williams, Corry, R. D. 
E. Estella Kennedy, 101 W. Smith St.^ 
Corry. 

First and third Saturdays, G. A. Rv 
Hall 



ERIE-FAYETTE 



UNION CITY, 89. 

Lee Wilson, Union City. 

Hannah Holden, Union City. i 

jMary Chapin, Union City. 

Second and fourtli Saturdays, u-. A, 

R. Hall. 

WATTSBURG, 106. 

A. J. Merry, Wattsxburg, R. D. No. 4. 
Mrs. Cora Carson, Wattsburg, R. D. 

No. 4. 
Mrs. Eva Harwood, Wattsburg. 

Second and fourth Fridays, Opera 

House. 

3IILL VILLAGE, 131. 

Thomas Miller, Cambridge Springs, 

Crawford Co., R. D. No. 4. 
Mrs. E. O. Deland.Cambridge Springs, 

Crawford Co.. R. D. No. 4. 
Mrs. Ruby Jones, Mill Village. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 
m., I. O. O. F. Hall. 

PHILIPSVILLE, 147. 

H. H. Rose, Wattsburg, R. D. No. 2. 
E. E. Austin, Wattsburg, R. D. No. 3. 
Mrs, Sylvia Titus, Wattsburg, R. L>. 

No. 3. 
P. A — ^Sumner Bemis, Wattsburg, R. 
D. No. 1. 
First and third Wednesdays, Grange 
Hall. 

GREENFIELD, 226. 

Mrs. Mildred Johnson, Wattsburg, 
li. D. 
C. O. Wakeley North East, R. D. 

No. 6. 
.'Mrs. Helen Henderson, North East, 

R. D. No. 6. 
:P. a. — W. C. Johnson, Wattsburg, 
R. D. 
Thursdays, 2 p. m., Grange Hall. 

HARBOR CREEK, 385. 

Geo. C. Sewell, Wesleyville. 

Mrs. Sarah Wadsworth, Harbor Creek, 

R T) No 2 
Alice Y. Walker,' Harbor Creek, R. D. 

No. 1. 
P. A. — A. Y. Walker, Harbor Creek, 
R. D. No. 1. 
First and third Thursdays, homes of 
members. 

WATERFORD, 423. 

E. O. Allen, Waterford, R. D. No. 4. 
Mfs, J. M. Trask, Waterford. 
C. L. Giddings, Waterford, R. D. 
No. 4. 
Second and last Saturdays, Water- 
iord. 

EDINBORO, 947. 

B. T. Hills, Edinboro. 
Wm. N. Lawrence, Edinboro. 
■JEUen Lawrence, Edinboro. 
Alternate Saturdays, 2 p. m. 

CONNEAUT, 955. 

"M. Minos Cole. Pennside. 

Mrs. O. H. Hewett, Albion. 

A. K. Waters, Albion. 

First and third Saturdays, Penn- 
side. 



18 



ELK CREEK. 997. 

P. C. Wimersberger, Lundy's Lane. 
Mrs. Mary Hillyer, Lundy's Lane. 
Henry Matthews, Lundy's Lane. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, K. of 

P. Hall. 

SUMMIT, 1079. 

W. E. Lawrence, Erie, R. D. No. 3. 
Mrs. W. E. Lawrence, Erie, R. D. 

No. 3. 
H. J. Osborne, Erie, R. D. No. 3. 

Second and fourth Thursdays, 

Town Hall. 

CHERRY HILL, 1214. 

R. H. Griffey, Albion, R. D. No. 1. 

Miss Pansy Walworth, Albion, R. D. 
No. 1. 

Mrs. Emma Harrington, East Spring- 
field, R. D. No. 1. 

P. A. — A. L. Swap, Albion, R. D. 
No. 1. 

SPRINGFIELD, 1257. 

Alex. Teudhope, Girard. R. D. No. 1, 
Mrs. Alex. Teudhcpe, Girard. 
W. L. Merrett, West Springfield. 
P. A. — Geo. Eagley, North Spring- 
field. 

First and third Saturdays, East 

Springfield. 

CLOVER LEAF, 1265. 

O. S. Kidder, North East, R. D. No. 4. 
M. D. Newton, North East, R. D. 

No. 3. 
Bessie Taber, North East, R. D. No. 2. 

Second and fourth Saturdays at 1 

p. m., I. O. O. F. Hall. 

BELLE VALLEY, 1294. 

Lauren Miller, Erie, R. D. No. 5. 
Mrs. Lauren Miller, Erie, R. D. No. 5. 
Fred Miller, Erie, R. D. No. 5. 

First and third Tuesday evenings, 

Belle Valley Hall. 

WEST GREEN, 1296. 

H. F. Shade, Waterford, R. D. No. 9. 
Mrs. D. D. Turner, Waterford, R. D. 

No. 9. 
Mrs. Julia Myers, Waterford, R. D. 

No. 9. 



FAYETTE 



DAWSON, 419. 

W. D. Hixson, Dawson, R. D. No. 30. 
J. B. Cunningham, Dawson, R. D. 

No. 30. 
R. T. Hutcinson, Dawson, R. D. No. 30. 
P. A. — F. P. Stickel, Dawson, R. D. 
No. 30. 
First and third Tuesday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

GERMAN, 785. 

Wm. L. Newcomer, Messmore. 
D. F. Hostetler, Messmore. 



S. 



PRANKLIN-POR£ST-HUNTINGDON 



L. D. Woodfll, Smithfleld, R. D. No. 7. 

P. A. — Isaac A. Huhn, Masontown, R. 
D. No. 15. 
Every Thursday evening, S. J. New- 
comer's. 

WOODSIDE, 1008. 

W. H .Poundstone, Smithfleld, R. D. 

No. 9. 
L. D. Ramsey, Smithfleld, R. D. No. 8. 
R. M. Britt. Smithfleld, R. D. No. 8. 
P. A. — M. P. Blosser, Smithfleld, R. 
D. No. 9. 
Every Tuesday evening, Grange 
HalL 

DUNBAR, 1022. 

L. L. Collins, Vanderbilt. 
Aaron Fairchild, Vanderbilt. 
Arthur P. Freed, Vanderbilt, R. D. 
No. 26. 
Second and fourth Tuesday even- 
•ings, I. O. U. A. M. Hall. 

CURFEW, 1052. 

Wm. R. Dunn, Smock, R. D. No. 24. 

E. E. Arnold, Vanderbilt. 

Wm. H. Cooper, Smock, R. D. No. 24. 

P. A. — -B. E. Arnold, Vanderbilt. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, Flatwood's Hall. 

MEXAIiLEX, 1091. 

Wm. L. Swartz, Uniontown. 

Mrs. Mary M. Whitlock, Uniontown, 

R. D. No. 4. 
Miss Pearl Swartz, Uniontown, R. D. 

No. 3. 
P. A. — -C. h. Swartz, Uniontown, R. D. 
No. 4. 
Second and fourth Fridays, W. L. 
Swartz's. 

UNION, 1103. 

Wm. M. Thompson, Uniontown. 
Annie P. Barnes, Uniontown. 
Wm. P. Barnes, Uniontown. 

First Thursday evening, I. O. O. F. 

Hall, Uniontown, 

MIT.L RUN, 1109. 

C. K. Brooks, Mill Run. 

W. A. MoCune, Mill Run. 

W. H. Minor, Mill Run. 

P. A. — Francis Everharter, Mill Run. 

First and third Saturdays, Mill 

Run. 

HOPEWELU, 1114. 

R. H. Acklin, East Millsboro. 

L, F. Arensburg Millsboro. 

J. E. Wood, Millsboro. 

P. A. — Master. 

First and third Wednesday even- 
ings, J. E. Wood's. 

WxlLTERSBURG , 1 144. 

S. H. Marris, Upper Middletown, R. 
D. No. 13. 

Mrs. Lena Harenbeck, Waltersburg. 

E. J. Wilderman, Waltersburg. 

P. A. — R. H. Brown, Waltersburg. 
Alternate Tuesday evenings, Wal- 
tersburg HalL 



FRANKLiIN, 1169. 

C. E. Allen, Smock. 
Robert Allen, Smock. 

F. E. Roderick, Upper Middletown. 
P. A. — J. H. Ri'ttenhouse, Smock. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 1 

p. m., Smock Hall. 

MORNING STAR. 1271. 

Joseph W. Miller, Grindstone, R. D. 

No. 23. 
Geo. C. Allen, Smock, R. D. No. 25. 
E. B. Ford, Grindstone, R. D. No. 23. 
P. A. — Geo. M. Blythe, Grindstone, R. 
D. No. 23. 
Alternate Thursday evenings, J. O. 
U. A. M. Hall. 

FRANKLIN 

MONT ALTO, 1243. 

Elmer E. Stouffer, Mont Alto. 
Geo. H. Wirt, Mont Alto. 
Geo. B. KaufCman, Mont Alto. 

Alternate Friday evenings, school 

house. 

ALTENWALD, 1282. 

D. H. Yaukey, Altenwald. 

M. S. Herman, Chambersburg, R. D. 

No. 11. 
M. S. Branthaver, Chambersburg, R. 

D. No. 10. 
P. A. — H. J. Wertz, Chainbersburg, 

R. D. No. 10. 
Second Friday evening, Altenwald. 

FOREST 

FOREST, 853. 

J. A. Cropp, Tionesta. 
R. W. Ledebur, Starr. 
Miss Florence Cropp, Tionesta. 
Eve, Mt. Union Hall. 

HUNTINGDON. 

HUNTINGDON. 

SHIRLEYSBURG, 119. 

S. H. Greve, Shirleysburg. 

J. L. Enyeart, Shirleysburg. 

A. J. Kelly, Shirleysburg. 

P. A. — D. P. Enyeart, Shirleysburg. 

Alternate Saturday evening, Miller's 

Hall. 

DONATION, 330. 

Geo. E. Corcelius, Petersburg, R. D. 

No.--l..„, 
John H. WilsQn, Huntingdon, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Josephine Wilson, Huntingdon, R. D. 
No. 2. 
Alternate Saturday er^ening. Grange 
Hall. 

SHAVERS CREEK, 353. 

Miles Henderson, Neff's Mills. 
R. D. Gregory, Petersburg, R. D. 
D. Ross Gregory, Petersburg, R. D. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

First and third Saturday, Moores- 

Tille. 



19 



I N D I AN A- J CFF£RSON 



I 



RED OAK. 364. 

Van. Pierce, Huntingdon. 
R. T. Decker, Union Church. 
Ellie Berg-atz, Union Church. 

First Saturday after first quarter, 

Grange Hall. 

MOUNT UNION, 368. 

M. W. Dell, Norrace. 

J. S. Harrencame, Norrace. 

M. F. Swope, Norrace. 

P. A. — 'E. B. Harrencame, Norrace. 

Alternate Saturday evening, schoo* 

house. 

HART'S IjOG valley, 375. 

A. M. Allen, Alexandria. 

C. H. Whittaker. Alexandria, R. D. 

No. 1. 

B. B. Miller, Alexandria, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Friday evening on or before full 
moon, Alexandria. 

TROUGH CREEK, 444. 

M. H. Taylor, Todd. 

Jonathan Evans, Eagle Foundry. 

Olive Evans, Eagle Foundry. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

LINCOLN, 914. 

Prof. I. E. Boyer, James Creek. 
H. C. Boyer, Aitch. 
J. C. Steinbach, Aitch. 

P. A.^ — ^Secretary. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings, 

Town Hall, Markelsburg. 

. HARES VALLEY, 933. 

Ida L. Stever, Mapleton Depot, R. D. 

No. 1. 
W. W. McKim, Coles Summit. 
Esther M. Drake, Saltillo. 

Alternate Saturday evenings,Grange 
Hall. 

LAFTA GROVE, 935. 

J. Frank Wright, Mapleton Depot. 
Ephriam Lell, Mapleton Depot. 
R. P. Smith, Mapleton Depot. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Hall, 

Latta Grove. 

FORT, 951. 

T. M. McCall, McAlevy's Fort. 
W. H. Henderson, McAlevy's Fort. 
A. Amelia Hirst, McAlevy's Fort. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 1:30 

p. m., Fairview Hall. 

JEFFERSON, 956. 

S. W. Pogue, Orbisonia. 

D. W. Irwin, Pogue. 

Mrs. Sue Pheasant, -^ogue. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Jef- 
ferson school house. 

WARRIOR'S MARK, 974. 

E. J. Stover,* Warrior's Mark. 
Sadie M. Ross, Warrior's Mark. 
John T. Patton, Warrior's Mark. 

P. A.— F. P. Confer, Warrior's Mark. 
Second and fourth Friday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 



20 



McCONNELLSTOWN, 1001. 

Harry Grubb, McConnellstown. 

George Robb, Alexandria. 

Samuel F. Moyer, Alexandria. 

P. A. — Master. 

First and third Tuesday evenings. 
Eagle Hall, McConnellstown. 

MAPLETON, 1134. 

John W. Foster, Mapleton Depot. 
J. G. Hicks, Mapleton Depot. 
T. M. Wood, Mapleton Depot. 

Alternate Monday evening, I. O. O. 

F. Hall. 

SALTILLO, 1196. 

Ed. M. Drake, Saltillo. 

Harry Cornelius, Three Springs. 

R. W. Hudson, Saltillo. 

Last Wednesday cviming, Saltillo 

Hall. 

CALVIN, 1210. 

W. L. Swope, Colfax. 

Mrs. J. W. Chilcote, Colfax. 

C. M. Glasgow, Calvin. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

P. O. S. of A. Hall. 

SAULSBURG, 1211. 

H. C. Crownover, Saulsburg. , 

Mrs. Catharine M. Ryder, Manor Hall. 
Robert A. Porter, Saulsburg. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Saulsburg. 

KEYSTONE, 1226. 

S. L. Smith, Colfax. 
W. L. Mosser, Huntingdon. 
A. M. Kelly, Huntingdon. 
P. A. — -Secretary. 

First Tuesday evening, Hawn's 

school house. 

INDIANA 



ARCADIA, 176. 

R. A. Harbison, Clarksburg. 

T. S. Marshal, Saltsburg, R. D: 

H. P. Sandles, Clarksburg. 

P. A. — Secretary. 

First and third Mondays, Clarks- 
burg. 

CUSH C:i^EEK, 573. 

J. Li. Kinann, Oi^. 
D. R .Colgan, Wilgus. 
H. Steele Treese, Arcadia, R. D. No.37. 
P. A. — G. W. Treese, Arcadia, R. D. 
No. 37. 

First and third Saturday evenings. 

Smith Hall. 

JEFFERSON 

ELDER, 503. 

Rev. H. G. Teagarden, Punxsutawney, 
West Mahoning St. 

Mrs. C. A. Morris, Oliveburg. 

Chas. A. Morris, Oliveburg. 

Second and fourth Tuesday even- 
ings, Oliveburg. 



'n 



JUNIATA-LACKAWANNA 



RIDGE, 516. 

J. C. Sprankle, Punxsutawney, R. D. 

No. 4. 
Mrs. M. F. Smathers, Grange. 
A. H. Lingenfelter, Punxsutawney, R. 
D. No. 4. 
First and third Tuesday eveniijgs, 
Grange Hall. 

UNION, 609. 

D. R. Butler, Kirkman. 

Frank Scott, Kirkman. 

Cozie Milliron, Kirkman. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings. Grange Hall. 

ROSE, 653. 

H. E. McGarey, Stanton, 
Mrs. C. R. Spackman, Stanton. 
W. N. Brosius, Stanton. 
Monday evening, Stanton. 

PLEASANT HILIi, 656. 

J. H, Johns, Brookville, R. D. No. 2. 
J. M. Chitester, Brookville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. G. G. Chitester, Brookville, R. 
D. No. 2, box 68. 
Every Saturday evening. Grange 
' Hall. 

WARSAW, 691. 

K. C. Johnson, Warsaw. 

A. Johnson, Hazen. 

Mrs. J. Li. Aaron, Hazen. 

First and third Tuesday evenings, 

Hazen Hall. 

GREEN VAIiDEY, 770. 

G. H. Small, Brookville, R. D. No. 3. 
Blair J. Shaffer, Brookville, R. D. 

No. 3. 
J. I. Allshouse, Brookville, R. D. No.3. . 
Alternate Saturday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

PARADISE, 854. 

John Dougherty, Wishaw. 

Mrs. E. M. Hillis, Reynoldsville, R. 

D. No. 3. 
Mrs. A. J. Sprague, Reynoldsville, R. 
D. No. 3. 
Every Friday evening. Grange 
Hall. 

DEWEY, 1171. 

Wm. Wetzel, Eniericksville. 
Katie Sprague, Emericksville. 
Guy Schugars, Emericksville, 

Second Friday, P. O. S. of A. Hall. 

HORMTOWN, 1259. 

James A. Hetrick, Reynoldsville, R. 

D. No. 1. 
K. B. Deemer, Reynoldsville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Harry T. Craven, Reynoldsville, R. D. 

No. 1. 

RATHMEL, 1264. 

N. F. Dean, Rathmel. 
Mrs. O. H. Broadhead, Rathmel. 
A. W. Mulhollan, Rathmel. 
P. A. — J. K. Womeldorf, Reynolds- 
ville. 

Second and fourth Fridays, P. O. 

S. of A. Hall. 



ROSEVILLE, 1290. 

A. L. Shaffer, Brookville, R. D, No. 4. 
J. W. Hindman, Brookville, R. D. No. 

4. 
W. B. Cowan, Brookville, R. D. No. »4. 
P. A. — R. J. Fitzimons, Brookville, R. 

D. No. 4. 
8 p. m., Roseville Hall. 



JUNIATA 



31 



SPRUCE HIIjL, 772. 

D, B. Esh, Spruce Hill. 
D. W. Guss, Spruce Hill. 
C. Yoder, Pleasant View. 

Friday on or before full moon, 

Grange Hall. 

MIIiFORD, 773. 

W. N. Sterrett, Mifflintown. 

Charles McCahan, Mifflin, R. D. No. 1. 

Mrs. Mary Aughey, Mifflin, R. D. No. 

P. A. — 'Secretary. 

Second and fourth Thursdays, 
homes of members, 

TUSCARORA, 774. 

W. P. Bell, Reeds Gap. 
Alice Crawford, McCoysville. 
Mrs. Alice Crawford, MoCoysville. 

Last Saturday at 1 p. m., homes of 

members. 

WALNUT, 776. 

J. W. Partner, Walnut. 
B. P. Clark, Aoademia. 
W. A. Hostetler, Walnut. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

TURBETT, 781. 

Kenny Robinson, Port Royal. 
Wm. H. Groninger, Port Royal. 
W. E. McMeen, Port Royal. 

First Tuesday evening, Grange Hall 

WALKER, 786. 

G. W. Kerchner, Van Dyke. 

Nettie E. Ailman, Thompsonto'Vfn. 

Theora Hostetler, Thompsontown. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, homes of members. 

LACK, 1094. 

W. J. Short, Waterloo. 
Jacob Shearer, Blair's Mills. 
J. S. Golyer, Perulack. 

First and third Saturday, Walnut 

Grove school house. 

LACKAWANNA 

NEWTON, 251. 

F. H. Cooper, Bald Mount. 

F. N. Morrow, Schultzville. 

W. E. Thompson, Bald Mount. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, P. O. S. of A. Hall. 



LANCASTER.-LEHIGH-LUZERNE 



;,i ';' 






1 

■■'.i;i'' 

,11 f.; 



MADISON, 899. 

W. H. Swartz, Madisonville, 

J. A. Yeager, Aberdeen. 

C. H. Ives, Madisonville. 

Every Tuesday evening, Madison- 
ville. 

COVINGTON, 1029. 

Lionel Winsliip, Moscow. 

C. E. Lear, Oaleville. 
Elizabeth Winship, Dalevllle. 

P. A. — Lionel Winship, Moscow. 

Every Friday evening, Grange Hall. 

SPRING BROOK, 1037. 

Evan T. Bowen, Spring Brook. 
WW. J. Jones, Spring Brook. 
Wm. Durland, Spring Brook. 

Second and fourth Wednesdays. 

Grange Hall. 

RYERSON, 1180. 

J. M. Biesecker, Freytown. 
Mrs. Minnie Basley, Freytown. 
Mrs. E. A. Sayer, Freytown. 

Every Saturday evening, Grang* 

Hall. 

EAST BENTON, 1198. 

Mrs. G. R. Post, Dalton, R. D. No. 8. 

D. D. Franklin, Dalton, R. D. No. 3. 
A. P. Rhodes, Dalton, R. D. No. 3. 
P. A. — C. A. Post, Dalton, R. D. No. 3. 

Second and fourth Wednesday even- 
ings. East Benton 

ELEETVILLE, 1199. 

Miss Emma Barber, Dalton, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. C. P. Fisk, Dalton, R. D. No. 1. 
W. H. VanFleet, Factoryville, R. D.No. 

2, Wyoming- Co. 
P. A. — B. F. VanFleet, Factoryville, 
R. D. No. 2, Wyoming Co. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Fleet- 
vttlle 

WEST ABINGTON, 1200 

Geo. H. Colvin, Dalton, R. D. No. 2. 
Mabel Dean, Factoryville, Wyoming 

Co. 
Geo. F. Gethamn, Dalton, R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Every Wednesday evening, Capwell 

Hall. 

SOUTH ABINGTON, 1295. 

C. M. Pellman, Chinchilla. 
E. A. Myers, Clark's Summit. 
C. S. Griffin, Clark's Summit. 



LANCASTER 



FULTON, 66. 

John A. MoSparran, Furniss. 

Jennie Brown, Peter's Creek. 

T. C. Evans, Drumore, R. D. No. 2. 

P. A. — James G. McSparran, Furniss. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, Fair- 
field. 



LEHIGH 



WASHINGTON, 869. 

L. B. Geiger, Slatington, R .D. No. 1. 
Peter Krum, Slatington, R. D., No. 1. 
J. F. Peter, Slatington, R. D. No. 1. 

Alternate Tuesday evenings, Grang© 

Hall. 



LUZERNE 



SALEM, 291. 

R. O. Bower, Berwick, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. Ellen Hosier, Beach Haven. 
Stanley Seybert, Berwick, R. D. No. 1. 
Saturday evening, Salem Hall, 

HUNTINGDON CREEK, 398. 

J. B. Sutliff, Huntingdon Mills. 
H. B. Larned, Huntingdon Mills. 
W. T. Ridall, Waterton. 

Saturday afternoon. Grange Hall. 

BLOOMINGDALE, 536. 

Luther Seward, Bloomlngdale. 

Z. H. Stevens, Broadway. 

G. W. Culver, Bloomingdale. 

Wednesday evenings, Grange Hall. 

MOUNTAIN, 567. 

E. E. Harris, Trucksville, R. D. No. 1. 
Porter Michaels, Trucksville, R. D. 

No. I.- 
Mrs. Ella Searfoss, Carverton. 
P. A. — E. E. Harris, Trucksville, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, 
Grange Hall. 

EXETER, 668. 

Laiwrence Dymond, Exeter. 
W. J. Lewis, Harding. 
J. E. Kitchen, Harding. 

First and third Saturday evenings. 

Grange Hall. 

LAKE, 812. 

C. H. Randall, Alderson, R. D .No. 1. 
Mrs. J. E. Williams, Alderson, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mary R. Williams, Alderson, R, D. 

No. 1. 
P. A. — J. E. Williams, Alderson, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Saturday evening, Grange Hall. 

BEAVER RUN, 813. 

Wm. Galloway, Rugg"les. 

F. G. Shulde, Ruggles. 

L. H. Kocher, Ruggles. 

P. A. — L. H. Kocher, Ruggles. 

Saturday evening, L. H. Kocher'a 

Hall. 

LEHMAN, 819. 

William Armstrong, Alderson, R. D. 

No. 1. 
J. A. Hildebrant, Dallas, R. D. No. 2. 
F. J. Rogers, Outlet. 

Saturday evening, Lehman Grang* 

Hall. 



22 



•I 



ti >'. 



LYCOMING-McKCAN 



KUNCKIiE, 930. 

Stanley Hosier, Dallas R. D. Xo. 1, 

box 37. 
Edith L. Hosier, Dallas, R. D .No. 1, 

Box 37. 
Hiss Annie Herdman, Dallas, R.D. No. 

1, box 35. 
P. A. — W. H. Herdman, Dallas, R. D. 
No. 1, Box 35. 
First and third Saturday, Grange 
H^l. 

CENTRE HILL, 102«. 

C. M. Honeywell, Dallas. 
W. W. Bare, Dallas. 
J. C. Ryman, Dallas, R. D. N. 1. 
P. A. — W. H. Whipp, Dallas, R. D. 
No. 1 
Saturday evening. Grange Hall. 

SWEET VALLEY, 1260. 

Stanley Post, Sweet Valley. 
Hrs. I. B. Hornbaker, Sweet Valley. 
Charles Allen. Sweet Valley. 
P. A. — Chas. Allen, Sweet Valley. 
Tuesday evening. Sweet Valley. 

SUGAR LOAF, 1287. 

Charles Tressler, Conyngham. 
C. E. Correll, Conyngham. 
Otis Smith, Conyngham. 

LYCOMING 

EAGLE, 1. 

W. M. Faust, Montgomery, R. D. 

J. D. Piatt, Hontgomery, R. D. 

Kate H. HcCormick, Montgomery, 
R. D. 
iSecond and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, Eagle Grange Hall. 

CANUSERAGO, 27. 

Charles W .Griggs, Hughesville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Annie Griggs, Hughesville, R. D. No. It 
J. B. Vanderibilt, Hughesville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Thursday evening, G. A. R. Hall. 

WEST BRANCH, 136. 

Harry F. Clees, Hontoursville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Hrs. Wm. H. Stryker, Hontoursville, 

R. D. No .2. 
G. W. Drick, Hontoursville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
P. A. — G. W. Drick, Hontoursville, R. 

D. No. 1. 
Wednesday evening. Grange Hall. 

JACKSON UNION, 210. 

B. F. Fritz, Benton, R. D. No. 5, 

Columbia Co. 
Hrs. Anna Faus, Unityville, R. D. No, 

2. 
S. H. Hott, Unityville, R. D. No. 2. 

CARPENTER, 454. 

J. W.' HcU'wain, Leolyn, 

C. W. Hager, Hagers, Tioga Co. 
E. L. HcNett, Leolyn. 

Thursday evening, Leolyn Grange 
Hall. 



23 



BOTTLE RUN, 1301. 

Geo. Robison, WilMamspart, R. D* 

No. 2. 
L. A. Pidcoe, Linden, R, D. No. 3. 
Frank Sholder, Linden, R, D. No. 3. 

GLADE RUN, 1160. 

Lazarus Hurray, Turbutville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
B. F. Johnson, Huncy, R. D. No. 1. 
W. W. Foust, Huncy, R. D .No. 1. 
P. A. — Franklin Hurray, Huncy. 
Tuesday evening, Grange Hall, 

WHITE HALL, 1244. 

G. A. DeWall, Hontgomery, R. D^ 

No. 2. 
Dr. W. E. Hetzger, Alvira, Union Co» 
Emma C. Baker, Hontgomerv, R. D^ 

No. 2. 
P. A. — Samuel Sedam, Allenwood, R. 
D. No. 2, Union County. 
First and third Tuesday, Grangyi 
Hall. 



McK£AN 



LIBERTY, 1182. 

W. E. Sawyer, Wrights. 

Ida V. Holden, Port Allegheny. 

Annette Stone, Port Allegheny. 

First and third Saturday, Wood-- 

man's Hall. 

VALLEY, 1190. ' 

C. L. Palmer, Smethport, R. D. No. 8.. 
Nellie Palmer, Smethport, R. D. No. 3. 
Lura Day, Smethport, R. D. No. 3. 

Every Saturday evening.Stull's Hall. 

CORYVILLE, 1212. 

F. S. Holmes, Corryvlle. 
Mrs. Grace A. Stull, Corryville. 
Mrs. Hary D. Howden, Corryville. 

Every Thursday evening, Stull's 

Hall. 

TURTIjE point, 1236. 

H. E. Simar, Port Allegheny. 
Hrs. O. W. Abbey, Turtle Point. 
A. G. Wandover, Turtle Point. 

ELDRED, 1237. 

D. E. Waller, Eldred. 
Hrs. D .E. Waller, Eldred. 
Hyrtie Wright, Eldred. 

Every Wednesday evening, Eldred. 

FIDELITY, 1238. 

James HcG-owan, .Smethport. 

Mrs. Lyda Abbey, Smethport. 

O. D. Nourse, Smethport, R. D. No. 1. 

P. A. — -Secretary. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

I. O. O. F. Hall. 

CERES, 1253. 

H. J. Butler, Ceres, New York, R. D. 
Leta Hurphy, Eldred. 
L. J. White, Ceres, New York, Alle- 
gheny Co. 
First and third Saturday, Ceres, 



•■s..^ 



a gj i-jne 



ll 

I'; 






M£RC£R - MIFPLIN- MONTGOMERY 



■ I 



LEAFYDALE, 1268. 

J. J. Houg-hton, Bradford, 5 5 Bennett 

Brook Road. 
Emily E. Nye, Bradford, box 882. 
Mrs. J. J. HougMon, Bradford, 55 
Bennett Brook Road. 
Second and fourth Monday even- 
ings, Main St., Bradford. 

BELiIfRUN, 1286. 

T". F. Bridge, Ceres, N. Y. 
Pansy Howard, Bellrun, Pa. 
Mrs. F. F. Bridge, Ceres, X. Y. 

First and third Saturday, evenings. 

Bell Run. 

RIXFORD, 1297. 

A. Conner, Rixford. 

Mrs. E. E. Shippy, Rixford. 

James M. Fraser, Rixford. 

M£RC£R 

DEER CREEK, 337. 

_A. M. Dickson, Sandy Lake, R. D. 

No. 27. 
IMrs. I. L. Unangst, Cochranton, R. D. 

No. 66, Crawford Co. 
7L. B. Unangst, Coohranton, R. D. No. 
66, Crawford Co. 
First and third Saturday, Grange 
Hall. 

SANDY LiAKE, 393. 

«. H. Nic'klin, Sandy Lake, R. D. 

No. 24. 
ISlrs. G. H. Nicklin, Sandy Lake, R. D. 

No. 24. 
S. Paul Jones, Polk, R. D. No. 1, 
Venango Co. 
Thursday evening, No. 2 school 
house. 

GENEVA, 538. 

D. A. Long, Hadley. 
William Koon. Hadley. 
Phenicie Morrison, Hadley. 
P. A. — N. H. Hill, Hadley. 

Saturday evening, Grange Hall. 

FRENCH CREEK, 595. 

"Orrin Farver, Carlton. 

Mrs. Esther 13. Farver, Carlton. 

IDaisy Dean McConnell,. Carlton. 

First and third Saturday, homes of 

members. 

NEW VERNON, 608. 

J. C. Clark, Clark's Mills. ^. D. No. 31. 
J. A. Martin, Clark's Mills, R. D. 

No. 31. 
D. E. McCartney, Clark's Mills, R. D. 

No. 32. 
P. A. — D. E. McCartney, Clark's Mills, 

R. D. No. 32. 
Saturday evening. Grange Hall. 

MITjL creek, 658. 

rS. I. GilMland, Sandy Lake, R. D. 

No. 25. 
H. K. Baker, Sandy Lake, R. D. No.25. 
Addison D'^Prance, Sandy Lake, R. D. 
No. 25. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
Jngs, Grange Hall. 



24 



FRIENDSHIP, 1232. 

J. H. Moreland, Jamestown, R. D. 

No. 40. 
R. L. Rogers, Jamestown, R. D. No. 

40. 
John H. Frey, Greenville, R. D. No. 
43. 
First and third Wednesday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 



MIFFLIN 



KISHACOQUILIiAS, 215. 

Davis Henry, Reedsville. 

S. W. Gilliland, Kishacoquillaa. 

Margaret A. Henry, Reedsville. 

OLIVER, 279. 

Adam Leffard, McVeytown. 
J. C. Coulter. McVeytown, R. D. No. 1. 
Robert Forgy, McVeytown, R.D. No.l. 
P. A. — Robert Forgy, McVeytown, R. 
D. No. 1. 
Last Saturday, Oliver Hall. 

GRANVIIvL/E, 731. 

F. I. McCoy, Granville. 

D. E. Notestine, Lewistown. 

G. A. Leapold, Lewistown. 

MONTGOMERY 

""keystone, 2. 

H. H. Fetterolf, Collegeville. 
John Wanner, Royersford. 
James R. Weikel. Trappe. 

First and ihii'd Wednesday evening, 

Merrifleld Hall. 

PENNYPACK, 8. 

Stephen H. *Lewry, Willow Grove. 
Set'h T. Walton, Willow Grove. 
Nan W. Lewry, Willow Grove. 

Monday evening, home of S. T. 

Walton. 

SANATOGA, 25. 

Wm. H. Wagner, Fegleysville. 

A. F. Saylor. Pottstown, R. D. No. 4. 
S. S. Derr, Pottstown, R. D. No. 4. 
P. A. — J. M. Erb, Sanatoga. 

Thursday evening, J. M. Erb Hall. 

COLD POINT, 606. 

Wm B. Richards, Norristown, R. D. 

No. 4. 
Mary L. Zimmerman, Norristown, R. 

"d. No. 3. 
James K. Thomson, Norristown, R.D. 
No. 4. 
First and third Tuesday evenings, 
Narcissa. 

WISSAIIICKON, 760. 

B. F. Dannehower. Springhouse. 

Mrs. B. F. Dannehower, Springhouse. 
Miss Emma V. Walton, Norristown, 
R. D. No. 4. 

First and third Thursdays, I. O. O. 

F. Hall. 



Jill, 



MONTOUR.-NORTHAMPTON-NORTHUMBERLAND 



HARMONY, 891. 

Oeorge Kreible, Cedars. 
OTiarles Klausfelder, Lansdale. 
W. B. Hendricks, Creamery. 
First and third Wednesday. 

MONTOUR 

STRAAVBERRY RIDGE, 34. 

E. M. Mourer, Strawberry Ridge, R.D. 

No. 2. 
Charles L. Mourer, Strawberry Ridge, 

R. D. No. 2. 
Mrs. R. A. Rishel, Strawberry Ridge. 
P. A. — C. E. Boone, Strawiberry Ridge, 

R. D. No. 1. 
Tuesday evening, Strawberry Ridge. 

DANVILLE, 57. 

A. C. Mourer Danville, R. D. No. 5. 
C V. Ammerman, Danville, R. D. 

No. 5. 
I. H. Weaver, Danville, R. D. No. 5. 
P. A. — I. H. Weaver, Danville, R. D. 
No. 5. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, home 
of A. C. Mourer. 

EXCHANGE, 65. 

Minnie M. Mills, Exchange. 

May Ellis, Torbotville, R. D. 

Laura Litchard, Strawberry Ridge, R. 

D. 
P. A. — J. H. Liitchard, Strawberry 
Ridge, R. D. 
Alternate Saturday evenings, Ex- 
change Hall. 

CALIFORNIA, 941. 

R. S. Blaine, Milton, R. D. No. 1. 

Miss Kathryn Wagner, Ottawa. 

E. D. Schnure, Milton, R. D. No. 2. 

Alternate Friday evening, Grange 

Hall. 

ENDEAVOR, 1108. 

C. C. Billmeyer, Milton, R. D. No. 1. 

Anna Billmeyer, Milton, R. D. No. I. 

C. E. Lazarus, Milton R. D. No. 1. 
Alternate Saturday evenings, Mex- 
ico. 

ELDORA, 1150. 

Alfred IH. Litchard, Muncy, R. D. 

No\ 1. 
Alice Allbeck, Muncy, R. D. No. 1. 
Paul Litdhard, Muncy, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — Paul Litchard, Muncy, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Wednesday evening, home of A. H. 
Litchard. 

VALLEY, 1184. 

J. A. Merrell, Danville, R.D. No. 2. 
L y. Beyer, Danville, R. Or N-orS. ""'"'' 
Augusta Merrell, Danville. R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — E. E. Renn, Danville, R. D. No. 
2. 
First and third Tuesday, Hall. 

NORTHAMPTON 



FARMERSVILLE, 328. 

E. A. Schweitzer, Nazai:eth. 
<Jeo. W. Coleman, Easton, 
No. 3. 



R. F. 



A. D. S'touffer, Freemansburg, box 17. 
First and third Saturday, Grams* 
Hall. 

BETHLEHEM. 504. 

A. J. Reaser, Dairy. 
J. C .Bruch, Bethlehem. 
M. H. Koehler, Bethlehem. 
P. A. — A. J. Reaser, Dairy. 
First Saturday, Dairy. 

BENNINGER, 829. 

W. M. Benninger, Bennifiger. 
H. A. Benninger, Benninger. 
A. A. Benninger, Berlinsville. 
P. A. — W. M. Benninger, 'Benninger. 
First and third Friday, Grange Hall.^ 

LOWER SAIJCON, 971;,*;- v 

D. M. Weber, Hellertown. 
W. P. Lerc'h, Hellertown. 

F. H. Reigel,, Hellertown. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

STAR, 993. 

Reuben F. Miller, Bath, R. D. No. 1. 
A. F. Meyer, Nazareth, R. D. No. 2. 
A F. Renner, Nazareth, R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — A. F. Renner, Nazareth, R. D. 
No. 2. 

Alternate Saturday evenings, Star 

Grange Hall, 

MOUNT BETHEL, 1100. 

Henry Reagle, Mount Bethel, R. 1>. 

No. 1. 
M. O. Reagle. Mount Bethel, R. D. 

No. 1. 

E. F. Smith, Mount Bethel, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Tuesday evening. Mount Bethel 
Grange Hall. 

DELAWARE VALLEY, 1191. 

Wm. H. Dillman. Martins Creek, R. 
D. No. 1. 

G. A. Depew, Martins Creek, R. D. 
^ No. X. 

F. Ofson Kline, Martins Creek, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Tuesday evening, Middaghs Store. 



NORTHUMBERLAND 



MOUNT PLEASANT, 68. 

John H. Moyer, Muncy. 
Thomas J. Ellis, Muncy. 
' -Wm. H. Wagner, Muncy. 

P. A. — ^Wm. H. Wagner, Muncy. 

First and third Saturday, home of 

J. H. Moyer. 

TURBUT, 249. 

Harvey J. Sones, Milton. 
Ellen S. Hottenstein, Milton. 
Verdilla Hottenstein, Milton, R. D, 
No. 1. 

Alternate Saturday evening, Grange 

Hall. 









26 



PERRY-PHILADELPHIA-POTTER. 



SHAMOKIN, 865. 

C. W. Densevich, 14S Pearl St., Sham- 

okin. 
Nellie Higgins, 109 N. Vine Street, 

Shamokin. 
William F. Coutts, 1109 N. Pearl St., 

Shamokin. 
Wednesday evening, G. A. R, Hall. 

GREEX BRIPR, 114j8. 

D. G. Moyer, Green Brier. 
Frank Rebuck, Rebuck. 
O. A. Snyder, Rebuck. 

P. A. — Secretary. 

First.-SU*ri*H:hird Saturday, Grange 







PCRR 



EIjIjIOTTSBURG, 626. 

J. S. Sheaffer, New Bloomfield, R. D. 

No. 1. 
S. B. Swartz, New Bloomfield, R. D. 

No. 1. 
W. E. Raffenspergcr, New Blocmfield, 

R. D. No. 1. 
Alternate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

OLIVER, 1069. 

Chas H. McNaughton, Newport, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Amos Fleisher, Newport, R. D. No. 1. 
J. B. Leinaweaver, Newport, R. D. 
No. 1. 
First and third Wednesday evening. 
Grange Hall. 

PHILADELPHIA 

PHILADELPHIA, 645. 

Wm. Bowler, Bustleton. 
Mary F. Irvin, Bustleton. 
Mary W. Jenkins, 9614 Bustleton Ave., 
Bustleton. 
First Thursday, Bustleton. 



POTTER 



ALPHA, 1099. 

L. C. Kilbourne, Sunderlineville, 

Bessie Weeks, Hector. 

V. W. Johnston, Hector. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Hec- 
tor Hall. 

WEST BRANCH, 1144. 

Charles Colgrove. Gaines, R. D. No. 1, 

Tioga County. 
George Rawson, Germania. 
Geo. Deiseroth, Galeton, R. D. No. 1. 
Alternate Thursdays, Grange Hall. 

ULYSSES, 1183. 

H. jG. Collins. Ulysses. 
Mrs. F. P. Wagner, Ulysses. 
Mrs. J. R. Grover, Ulysses. 

First and third Tuesdays, Ulysses. 



26 



VICTORIA, 1193. 

C. P. Bertch, Northfork. 

Mrs. M. Leach,' Northfork. 

Mrs. Flora Elder, Northfork. 

Second and fo-urth Tuesday even- 
ings, K. O. T. M. Hall. 

XORTH BINGHAM, 1194. 

A. O .Lewis, Genesee, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. Mabel A. Talbett, North Bing- 
ham. 
Thomas E. Talbett, Sr., North Bing- 
ham. 
Second and fourth Tuesdays, North 
Bingham. 

GENESEE, 1195. 

Mary Bishop, Genesee. 

Mrs. C. Sherman, Genesee, R .D. No. 1. 

Ira E. Easton, Genesee. 

First and third Saturdays, I. O. O. 

F. Hall. 

HARRISON, 1203. 

Mrs. Amanda Edwards, Harrison Val- 
ley. 
Mrs. Carrie Thompkins, Harrison 

Valley. 
Will R. Arnold, Harrison Valley. 
First and third Tuesday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

PRUDENCE, 1204. 

H. H. Hall, Ellisburg. 

Gertrude Chapman, Genesee, R. D. 

Mrs. Bessie Keech, Genesee, R. D. 
First and third Saturdays, Ellis- 
burg Church. 

GOLD, 1207. 

R. H. Pride, Gold. 

Miss Nellie Pride, Gold. 

Mrs. Cora Williams, Gold. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings. Grange Hall. 

CENTRAL, 1216. 

Curt Cochran, Stweeden Valley. 
Mrs. Minnie KJesa, Sweeden Valley. 
Mrs. Minnie Miller, Coudersport, R. 
D. No. 4. 

Second and fourtth Tuesdays, Grange 

Hall. 

FISHING CREEK, 1246. 

J. M. Webster, Roulette. 

Mrs. Beulah Webster, Roulette. 

Mrs. May Tauscher, Roulette, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Tauscher's Hall. 

SHARON, 1247. 

L. O. Prince, Shingle House. 
H. L. Pearsall, Shingle House. 
G. D. Appleby, Shingle House. 

Thursdays 8 p. m., 1. O. O. F. Hall. 

MILLPORT, 1248. 

Wallace Burdic, Sharon Centre. 

Ward B. Cole, Millport. 

H. C. Pratt, Sharon Centre. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 
Hall. ; 



SCHUYLKILL-«^YDER-SOMERSET 



HEBRON, 1251. 

I. H. Dingman, Coudersport, R. I>. 

No. 2. 
Mrs. Ella Stearns, Coudersport, R. D. 

No. 1. 

L. A. Kenyon, Coudersport, R.D. No. 2. 
First and third Saturdays, Reynolds' 
•Hall. 

COUDERSPORT, 1252. 

Li. R. Dudley, Coudersport. 
Mrs. L. R. Dudley, Coudersport. 
P. W. Lehman, Coudersport. 
P. A. — Li. R. Dudley, Coudersport. 

First and third Tuesday evening*, 

Eulalia Town Hall. 

ODIN, 1254. 

A. J. Quimby, Inez. 

O. L. Hail, Keating Summit. 

Clair L. Hall, Keating Summit. 

First and third Saturdays, Odin 

Grange Hall. 

MARTIN, 1274. 

A. B. Kilbourne, West Pike. 
M. A. Dyken«, West Pike. 

D. G. Wilson, West Pike. 

First and third Saturdays, West 
Pike. 

BURTVIIiLE, 1281. 

Frank Jordan, Port Alle^g'heny, R. D. 

No. 3, M'CKean Co. 
Hannah Jordan, Port Alleglieny, R. D. 

No. 3, McKean Co. 
Lydia F. Ernst, Port Allegheny, R. D. 
No. 3, McKean Co. 
First and third Tuesdays, Burt- 
ville. 

SOUTH BRANCH, 1288. 

James Hemphill, Oswayo, R. D. No. 1. 
Etta Clair. Oswayo, R. D. No. 1. 

E. D. Clair, Coudersport. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, school 
house. 

ROULETTE, 1289. 

Frank Reed, Roulette. 
Francis Van Gorder, Roulette. 
Delia Barr, Roulette. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Sullivan Bros.' Building. 



SCHUYLKILL 



SHENANDOAH, 833. 

Mrs. Rebena Kase, Shenandoah, 
Mrs. Cassie Lewis, Shenandoa/h. 
Mrs. Rebecca Hood, Shenandoah. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Third Wednesday, West Centre St., 

No. 113. 

FRACKVUjLiE, 1225. 

J. T. Garraway. Frackville. 

James Miller, Frackviile. 

C. E. Harris, Frackville. 

Second and last Wednesday even- 
ings, I. O. O. F. Hall. 



HEGINS, 1242. 

Calvin Otto, Hegins. 
J. H, Schrope, Hegins. 
A. A. Sohwalm, Hegins. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Alternate Wednesday evenings, K of 

G. E. Hall. 

McKEANSBURG, 1256. 

John Shoner, New Ringgold, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Oscar Bolich, McKe'ansburg. 
Charles H. Koch, McKeansburg. 
P. A. — 'Secretary. 

Jr. O. U. A. M. Hall. 

^UNNYSIDE, 1258. 

Chas. H. Maidenford, Pine Grove. 
A. J. Hummel, Pine Grove. 
A. J. Fidler, Rock. 

First Friday, DeTurksville. 

FRIEDENSBURG, 1291. 

C. E. Gerber, Cressona, R. D. 

Mrs. J. L. Marberger, Summit, R. D. 

No. 1. 
H. S. Mengel, Friedensburg. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Cooper's Hall, Friedensburg. 

RINGTOWN, 1292. 

Sylvester Brocious, Ringtown. 



27 



Milton Kester, Ripgtown. 

O. K., 1303. 

Harvey Ferrebee, Pine Grove, R. D. 

No. 3. 
J. S. Brown, Pine Grove, R, D. No. 8. 
C. W. Kerschner, Pine Grove, R. D. 

No. 3. 

SNYDER 

MONROE, 191. 

I. Newton Jarret, Selinsgrove, R. D. 

No. 1. 
John Hummel, Winfleld, R. D. No. 2. 
J. R. Young, Northumberland, R. D. 
No. 2. 
First and third Saturday evenings, 
Shamokin Dam. 

SOMERSET 

JENNER, 877. 

N. R. Miller, Boswell, R. D. No. 2. 
Hon. N .B. Critchfleld, Sipesville. 
A. E. Fritz, Stoyestown R. D. No. 1. 

First and third Saturday, Jenner 

Hall. 

VAIiLEY, 878. 

Alex. Coleman, Garrett, R. D. No. 1. 
J. F. Stahl, Garret, R. D. No. 1. 
Lucy C. Shoiber, Garrett, R. D. No. 1. 
First Tuesday, Beachdale. 

HIGHLAND, 879. 

H. J. Hoffman, Somerset, R. D. No. 2. 
A. B. Hoffman, Somerset, R. D. No. 6. 
J. C. Guag'y, Somerset, R. D.No. 2. 

Wednesday evening on or before 

full moon. Husband. 



SULLIVAN-SUSQUEHANNA 



SULLIVAN 

COIiLEY, 365. 

M. W. Reeser, Colley. 
Reuben Thrasher, Colley. 
P. L. Messersmtih, Colley. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Eyery Saturday evening, Grange 

Hall. 

ELKIvAND, 976. 

S. P. Shoemaker, Estella. 

E. G. Rogers. Lincoln Falls. 

Eva More, Forksville, R. D. No. 2, 

Box 13. 
P. A. — Secretary, Estella. 

DAVIDSON, 1081. 

Jacob A. Myers, Muncy Valley, 
Mrs. Frank Robbins, Sonestown. 
Torrence Bender, Muncy Valley. 

Every Friday evening. Grange Hall. 

CHERRY, 1224. 

H. R. Jacoby, Dushore, R. D. No. 1, 

box 51. 
Mrs. W. H. Yonkin, Dushore, R.D, No. 

1, box 72. 
Joseph Yonkin, Dushore, R. D. No. 1, 

box 76. 
P. A. — ^H. P. Yonkin. 

Every Wednesday evening. Election 
House. 

SUSQUEHANNA 

SUSQUEHANNA, 74. 

R. S. Searle, Montrose, 

Mrs. A. L. Lake, South Montrose. 

Loda E. Allen, South Montrose. 

P. A. — A. H. Jones, South Montrose. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m.. South Montrose. 

AUBURN, 101. 

G. W. Grow, Meshoppen, R. D. Wy- 
oming Co, 

'Chas. Stevens, Meshoppen, R. D. 
Wyoming Co. 

Emma Hyde, Meshoppen, R. D. No. 3, 
Wyoming Co. 

P. A. — A. L. Mericle, Meshoppen, R.D. 
No. 1, Wyoming Co. 
First and third Saturdays. 

UNION, 152. 

C. H. Ven Auken, Nicholson, R. D. 

N.o 1. ■■ ^llim 

L. B. Miller, Nicholson, R. D. No. 1. 

E. E. Johnson, Hop Bottom, R. D. 

No. 1. ,: .;ii ti jan 

p. A. — Secretary. 

iSecond and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Hall in Lathrop township. 

BROOKLYN, 246. 

E. D. Snyder, Hop Bottom, R. D. 
No. 1. 

Edith Benjamin, Montrose, R.D. No. 3. 

Mary Snyder, Hop Bottom, R.D.No. 1. 

p. A. — E. L, Weston, Brooklyn. 

First and third Saturdays, Brook- 
lyn. 



28 



NEW MILFORD. 289. 

E. J. Tyler, New Milford, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. A. C. Barrett, New Milford, R. D. 

No. 1. 
W. H. Tingley, New Milford, R. D. 

No. 2. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

Alternate Saturdays, Grange Hall. 

HIGHLAND, 339. 

O. C. Galloway, SusqueTianna, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. J. L. Blaisdell, Susquehanna, R, 

D. No. 1. 
Miss Lydia Bradford, Susquehanna, 

R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — Master. 

Alternate Saturdays 2 p. m., Jack- 
son Township. 

JACKSON. 342. 

C. S. Page, Lakeside. 
Mrs. Ella Williams, Gelatt. 
Mrs. Rose Page, Lakeside. 

iSecond and fourth Tuesdays,Grang© 

Hall. 

RISING SUN, 417. 

C. D. Dayton, Birchardville. 
Sarah Rhinevault, Birchardville. 
S. M. Melhuish, Birchardville. 

Alternate Saturdays, 2 p. m.. Grange 

Hall. 

HARFORD, 418. 

Mrs. Geo. Forsyth, Harford. 

Mrs. M. F. Tingley, Harford. 

C. L. Snyder, Kingsley, R. D. No. 1. 

P. A. — F. D. Wilmarth, Harford. 

First and third Saturday evenlnga. 

Grange Hall. 

GIBSON, 798. 

E. R. Gelatt, Gelatt. 

Addie Gelatt, Gelatt. 

O. P. Walker, Gelatt. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings. Gelatt. 

ELK LAICE, 806. 

C. W. Steadman, Elk Lake. 
Mrs. Mary Hay, Elk Lake. 
Ohas. E. Lathrope, Elk Lake. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, i p. 

m., Grange Hall. 

THOMPSON, 868. 

W. M. Whitney, Thompson. 
Allen D. Miller, Thompson. 
Julia M. Perry, Thompson. 

First and third Saturdays, 1:30 p. 

m., Grange Hall. 

UTILITY, 873. 

G. W. Bunnell, Meshoppen, R. D. No. 

3, Wyoming Co. 
John O. Lyman, Springville. 
Mrs. J. W. Stang, Springville. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m., Grange Hall. 

GIBSON STAR, 924. 

B. I. Morgan, Gibson. 
E. T. Senior, New Milford, R. D. 
No. 1. 



TIOGA 



Mrs. Emma Tiffany, New Milford, R. 

D. No. 1. 
P. A. — P. P. Payne, Kingsley, R. D. 
No. 1. 
On or before full moon evening, af- 
ternoon two weeks later, Gibson. 

SHILOH, 927. 

W. B. France, West Auburn. 
Miss Jennie Bolles, West Auburn. 
M. L. Bolles, West Auburn, 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m.. Grange Hall. 

liENOX, 931. 

Mrs. Dora E. Bennett, Glenwood. 
Mrs. C. W. Hoppe, Hop Bottom, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Fred N. Hardy, Hop Bottom, R. D. 

No. 2. 
P. A. — G. E. VanEtten, Lenoxville. 
First and third Saturdays, 1.30 p.m., 
Grange Hall. 

EAST GREAT BEND, 940. 

W. P. Mesick, Great Bend. 
Mrs. Bertha Brant, Great Bend. 
Mrs. Estella Roosa, Great Bend. 
P. A. — C. H. Brant, Great Bend. 

Alternate Thursday evenings.Grange 

Hall. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

HOP BOTTOM, 952. 

H. G. Wright, Hop Bottom. 
Mrs. D. L, Titus, Hop Bottom. 
Mrs. Ida Tiffany, Hop Bottom, 
P. A. — J. H. Hortman, Hop Bottom. 
Second and fourth Saturday, Hop 
. Bottom. 

LOCUST HILL, 967. 

F. B. Tiel, Hickory Grove. 

Lottie Tiel, Hickory Grove. 

J. F. DixQn, Hickory Grove. 

P. A, — ^C. L, VanAntwerp, Hickory 
Grove. 
Second and fourth Wednesday eve- 
nings, Grange Hall. 

FRIENDSHIP, 1018. 

©iles H. Lyon, Uniondale. 

J. H. Reeder, Tresco. 

A. M. Williams, Uniondale. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

PAIRDALE, 1157. 

Halsey Smith, Fairdale. 
E. L. Jones, East Rush. 
Ethel Sterling, Montrose, R. D. No. 2. 
Alternate Saturdays, Fairdale. 

HOPE, 1166. 

R. C. Tobey, Hallstead. 

Chas. Banker, Hallsitead. 

Mrs. Hattie Loomis, Hallstead. 

Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, Loomis Hall. 

RUSH, ,1167. 

J. W. Brotzman, Rush. 
Anna Hyde, Lawton. 
Lizzie Brotzman, Rush. 

First, third and fifth SatuuAays, 2 
, p. m., Lawton. 



ts 



29 



SOUTH AUBURN, 1188. 

Earnest Carlin, Meshoppen, R. D. No. 

2, Wyoming Co. 
Warren G. Place, Meshoppen, R. D. 

No. 2, Wyoming Co. * 
P. M, Baldwin, Skinner's Eddy, R. D. 
No. 1, Wyoming Co, 
Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 
p. m., Grange Hall, 

MIDDLETOWN, 1209. 

Joseph R, Howard, Middletown Centre. 
Samuel F, Davis, Neath. 
J. F. Whited, Friendsville, 

Every Saturday evening, Grange 

Hall. 

FRIENDSVILLE, 1217. 

R. Foran, Friendsville. 

Mrs, Patrick Byrne, Friendsville. 

John F. Moran, Friendsville. 

First and third Saturday, Parish 

Hall, 

MEADOW, 1227. 

David Shaughnessy, Lille Meadows. 

W. L, Bergin, Lille Meadows. 

P. L, Touhey, Warrenham, Bradford 

Co. 
P. A. — P, L. Touhey, Aurora, Brad- 
ford Co. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, E. B. Bearsddell Hall. 

BURNWOOD, 1278. 

C. P. Ross, Burnwood. 
Frederick Howell, Gelatt. 
H, E. Bennett, Burnwood, 

Alternate Saturdays, l:3f, p. m., 

Burnwood. 

CA3IBRIAN, 1293. 

O. C. Jones, Welsh Hill. 
John S. Sowers. Welsh Hill. 
Mrs, C. W, Howell, Parma. 



TIOGA 



CHARLESTON VALLEY, 54. 

Philander Bockus, Wellsboro, R. D. 
No. 5. 

Mrs. Mary E. Brooks, Roundtop. 

Bessie M. Tipple, Roundtop. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings, Grange Hall. 

SULLIVAN, 84. 

R. P. Ripley, Covingiton, R. D. No. 3. 
Mrs. Mitta Austin, Malneaburif. 
N. L. Spauldlng, Mainesi|>urg. 

First and third Tuesday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

OGDENSBURG, 298. 

F. B. Terry, Ogdensburg. 
Mrs. T. M. Tebo, Gleason. 
W. L. Miller, OgdenslDurg. 

First and third Saturday evenlnga 

Grange Hall. 



TIOGA 



MUDDLE RIDGE, 384. 

Arthur Walbridge, Wellsboro, R. D. 

No. 6. 
I. G. Stone, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 6. 
Mrs. Emma Walbridge, Wellsboro, R. 
D. No. 6. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings. Grange Hall, 

WARD, 600. 

Henry J. Hill, Canton. 
Orlo J. Smith, Canton, R. D. No. 73. 
Mrs. Hulda Furman, Canton, R. D. 
No. 73. 
Alternate Saturday evenings, Grange 
Hall. 

MIDDLEBURY, 705. 

Lannie Gee, Middlebury Centre. 
Mrs. Bessie Dickenson, Middlebury 

Centre. 
Rufus R. Owlet, Middlebury Centre. 

Alternate Saturday evenings, Locy 

Creek. 

UNION CENTRE, 784. 

G. C. Miller, Roaring Branch, R. D. 

No. 1, Lycoming Co. 
Mrs. J. C. Van Vcitchen, Roaring 
Branch, R. D. No. 1, Lycoming 
Co. 
J. C. Van Vetchen, Roaring Branch, 
R. D. No. 1, Lycoming Co, 
First and third Friday evening, Hall 
North Union. 

FAIR VIEW, 817. 

Wallace W. Davis, Knoxville, R. D. 
Minnie Clark, Osceola, R. D. No. 2. 
Mrs. Burr Van Dusen, Knoxville, R.D. 

Alternate Saturdays, Farmington 

Centre. 

EAST SULLIVAN, 821. 

C. L. Smith, Troy, R. D., Bradford Co. 
A. D. Ballard, Mansfield, R. D. No. 4. 
W. J. Squires, Mansfield, R. D. No. 4. 
P. A. — Ella Orvis, Mainsburg, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Second Wednesday, E. R. Orvis'. 

FARMINGTON HILL, 841. 

J, N. Leonard, Nelson. 

Mrs. Laura Whitman, Tioga. 

E. E. Leonard, Nelson. 

Alternate Saturday evening, Hall. 

AURORA, 874. 

Mrs. J. F. Hanerly, Wellsboro, R. D. 

No. 9. 
Leila Parsons, Cherry Flats. 
Mrs. F. H. Warden, We'llsboro, R. D. 
No. 9. 
First and third Saturday evenings. 
Cherry Flats. 

VALLEY, 87G, 

Eugene Sprague, W(^ptfleld, R. D. 

E. A. Tremain, Knoxville, R. D. No. 1. 

Mrs. Oliver Merrick, Knoxville, R. D. 

No. 2. 
P. A. — Wm. Wagner, Knoxville. R. D. 
No. 2. 
First and third Saturday i^venings, 
Academy Corners. 



30 



SHIPPEN, 902. 

S. S. Scranton, Marsih Creek. 
A. E. Hawk, Marsh Creek. 
Jennie Fisher, Aseph. 

First and third Saturday, Grange 

Hall. 

ALERT, 905. 

Wm. W. Stevens, Nelson, R. D. No. 2. 
Mrs. Leah Stevens, Nelson, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Mrs. Mame Cass, Nelson, R. D. No. 1. 
Alternate Saturday ev.enings.Nelson. 

MITCHELL'S MILLS, 912. 

Albert Deming, Lawrenceville, R. D. 
Mrs. Emma Friends, Lawrenceville, R. 

D. 
J. B. Smith, Somers Lane. 

Every Saturday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

NORTH ELK RUN, 913. 

G. W. Coveney, Mansfield. 

Mrs. G. W. Coveney, Mansfield. 

Mae Whitaker, Mansfield. 

First and third Tuesdays, Grange 

Hall, 

TIOGA VALLEY, 918. 

C. D. Kingsley, Mansfield. 
Mrs. Cora Davis, Mansfield. 
J. L. Hager, Mansfield. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Allen Block, Mansfield. 

TIOGA COUNTY CENTRE, 929. 

C. M. Shaw. East Charleston. 
Addle Shaw, East Charleston. 
Emma Rice, Mansfield, R. D, No. 3. 

First and third Friday evenings, 

East Charleston. 

LAWRENCE, 937. 

Bruce Brant, Lawrenceville. 
John CrofCut. Lawrenceville. 
Mrs. Lizzie Cornell, Lawrenceville. 

Every Saturday evening. Grange 

Hall. 

OSCEOLA, 957. 

Henry Harrington, Osceola, R. D. No. 

1. 
Mrs. Jennie Seely, Osceola, R. D. No. 

1. 
Mrs. Nancy Carr, Osceola, R. D. No. 1. 
Alternate Saturday evenlngs,Grange 
Hall. 

CROOKED CREEK, 966. 

M, N. Smith, Crooked Creek, R. D. No. 
2, 

Jacob Dean, Tioga, R. D. No. 1. 
Ida M. Bryant, Middlebury Centre. 

Alternate Saturday evenings, Church 

Hall. 

TROUP'S CREEK, 981. 

T. I. Stiles.Troupsburg, Steuben Coun- 
ty, N. Y.. R. D, No. 2, 
E, E. Holmes, Westfield, R. D. No. 2. 
Zylpha Cook, Westfield, R. D. No. 2. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Austinburg. 



TIOGA.UNION 



SABINSVILLE, 98». 

C. W. Bristol, Sabinsville. 
Carrie Atwell, Sabinsville. 
F. D. Wetherbee, Sabinsville. 

Alternate Saturday evenings, Grange 

Hall. 

WELLSBORO, 1009. 

L. D. Goodspeed, Wellsboro. 

E. J. Tuttle, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 1. 
W. H. Whiting, Wellsboro. 

P. A. — Secretary. 

'First and third Saturday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

COVINGTON BOKO, 1016. 

M. S. Managan, Covington, R. D. No. 

2. 
Mrs. M. S. Knowlton, Covington, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Mrs. E. O. Connelly. Covington. R. D. 
No. 2 
Alternate Tuesday evenings, Grange 
Hall. 

CHARLESTON UNION, 1017. 

F. E. Erway, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 11. 
L.. H. Bailey, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 11. 
C. N. Austin, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 11 

First and third Tuesday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

STONY FORK, 1033. 

A. W. Stratton, Tiadaghton, R. D. No. 

1. 
Mrs. Maggie Powers, Wellsboro, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Russel Valsing, Wellsboro, R. D. No. 
6. 
Second and fourth Thursday even- 
ings, Hall. 

SPENCERTOWN, 1035. 

H. S. Baldwin, Roaring Branch, R. D. 

No. 1, Lycoming County. 
C. M. Williams, Roaring Branch, R. D. 

No. 1, Lycoming County. 
L. M. Spencer, Grover, Bradford 
. County. 
First and third Saturday evenings, 
Spencertown. 

SEBRING, 1047. 

George Norman, Liberty, R. D. No. 2. 
Alma Zinck, Liberty, R. D. No. 2. 
Jennie Kohler, Liberty, R. D. No. 2. 
Alternate Saturday evenings, Grange 

Hall. 

NAUVOO, 1056. 

Leon H. Emmrck, Liberty, R. D. No. 

2. 
Mrs. Bertha Hart, Nauvoo. 
R. S. Brown. Morris, R. D. No. 1. 
First and third Thursdays, Grange 
HaM. 

SYLVESTER, 1078. 

L. B. Hunt, Westfield, R. D. 
P. H. Coffin, Westfield. R. D. 
Mrs. Hettie Daugherty, Westfield, R. 
D. No. 1. 

Second and fourth Saturdays. 

Grange Hall. 



EIULALIA, 1088. 

Byron S. Havens, Westfield. 

Mrs. Saphrona Weeks, Potter Brook. 

Randolph H. Buck, Westfield. 

Alternate Saturday, Jan. 6, etc., G. 

A. R. Hall. 

SOUTH UNION, 1092. 

T. F. DeCoursey, Roaring Branch, R. 

D. No. 2 Lycoming County. 
W. L. Thomas, Roaring Branch, R. D. 

No. 2, Lycoming County. 
C. W. Schmelzle, Roaring Branch, R. 
D. No. 2, Lycoming County. 
Every Saturday evening. Grange 
Hall. 

LORENTON, 1095. 

E. B. Graham, Morris, R. D. No. 1. 
S. P. Schneider, Lorenton. 

W. H. Schneider, Lofenton. 

First and third Wednesday evenings, 
Grange Hall. 

JOB'S CORNERS, 1110. 

F. C. Garrison, Rutland. 

Mrs. M. N. Doty, Seeley Creek, Che- 
mung County, N. Y. 
S. E. Jennings, Snedeckerville, Brad- 
ford County. 

Every Tuesday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

MARSHFIELD, 1113. 

H. H. Marsh, Marshlands. 

W. Kjelgaard, Gaines, R. D. No. 1. . . 

Miss Lula Hanscom, Gaines, R. D. No. 

1. 
P. A. — Mrs. N. L. Hanscom, Gaines, 
R. D. No. 1. 
Every Saturday evening, Grange 
Hall. 

EXCELSIOR, 1136. 

A, B. Doane, Little Marsh. 
F. A. Cooper, Little Marsh, 
Mrs. S. P. Beach, Little Marsh. 

Alternate Saturday evenings.Beach'a 

Hall. 

TIOGA, 1223. 

A, O. Groome, Tioga. 
Mrs. Louis Fri6nds, Tioga. 
Clara B. Steele, Tioga. 

Alternate Saturday, Jan. 13, etc., 

evening. Grange Hall. 

UNION. 

SPRING GARDEN, 32. 

Henry J. Sypher, Allenwood. 
Robt. Moore. Alvira. 
Julia A. Sypher, Allenwood. 
P. A. — ^Master. 

First and third Thursday, evenings, 

Sypher residence. 

WHITE DEER, 122. 

Wm. Richert, New Columbia. 
W. L. Mertz ,New Columbia. 

JUSTITIA, 434. 

J. H. Wingert, Lewisburg. 

Mrs. E. P. Gundy. Lewisburg. 

J. A. Grove, Bucknell. 

First Saturday, J. H. Wingert's res- 
idence. 



31 



VEN AN GO- WARREN 



BUFT^AIiO VAIiLEY, 520. 

D. K. Kelly, Buffalo Roads. 

Reuben Zimmerman, Buffalo Roads. 

D. L. Ruhl, Cowan. 

Alternate Fridays, Buffalo Roads. 

VENANGO 

OAKLAND, 281. 

G. N. Turner, Franklin, R, D. No. 3. 
C. M. Dyson, Franklin, R. D. No. 6. 
Sarah Neely, Dempseytown. 

First and third Thursdays.Dempsey 

town. 

CHERRY TREE, 284. 

W. E. Thompson, Titusville, R. D. No. 

78. 
Mrs. J. B. Brown, Titusville, R. D. No. 

77. 
J. C. Alcorn, Ti'tusville, R. D. No. 77. 
Second and fourth Saturday ev.en~ 
ings, Grange Hall. 

PINE GROVE, 893. 

H. O. Beck, Venus. 
Harry Kapp, Venus. 
L. E. Beck, Venus. 

First and third Tuesdays, Venus. 

SUGAR CREEK, 1131. 

C. V. Rieb, Cooperstown. 
Mrs. J. M. Boal, Cooperstown. 
B. F. Collins, Cooperstown. ^■ 

P. A. — ^Secretary. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Plum Corners. 



WARREN 

SPRING CREEK, 236. 

Thad. Perkins, Corry, R. D. No. 6. 
A. H. Olmstead, Corry, R. D. No. 6. 
Mrs. Ella Blakeslee, Corry, R. D. No. 
6. 

Second and fourth Saturdays,i2 p.m. 

Grange Hall. 

BROKENSTRAW, 407. 

Adna Weldon, Youngsville. 

Mrs. Mary J. Hartley, Youngsville. 

G. P. Mead. Youngsville. 

P. A. — Secretary. 

Second and fourth Saturdays,. 

Grange Hall. 

EliDRED, 467. 

Sherman M. Parker, Grand Valley. 
Edward E. Fetterolf, Grand Valley. 
Nina Blood, Grand Valley. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, Grand 

Valley. 

FARMINGTON, 839. 

D. B. Hitchcock, Lander. 
H. A. Robinson, Warren, R. D. No. 2. 
Miss Lizzie Peck, Lander. 
P. A. — C. R. Hoges and D. A. Johnion, 
Lander. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 



YALiLiEY, 846, 

L, H. Darling, CTiandler's Valley. 

Miss Nora Altenberg, Chandler's Val- 
ley. 

Bert J. Wilson, Chandler's Valley. 
First and third Saturdays, Chand- 
ler's Valley. 

SUGAR GROVE, 847. 

Geo. A. Woodside, Sugar Grove. 

Mrs. R. J. Weld, Sugar Grove, R. D. 

No. 4. 
Mrs. Geo. A. Woodside, Sugar Grove. 

Alternate Saturdays, Jan. 6, etc.» 

Grange Hall. 

ACKLEY, 870, 

Mrs. C. E. Marsh, Akeley. 
Ella Rickerson, Akeley. 
Gerald A. Hale, Akeley. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

COLUMBUS. 875. 
Wm. Messenger, Columbus. 
Mrs. Nellie Hall, Corry, R. D. No. 5. 
Mrs. L. L. Covel, Columibus. 

Second and fourth Saturdays^ 

Grange Hall. 

ELK, 911, 

John Lind. Russell. 
Gertrude Schuler, Russell. 
J. O. Lounsbury, Russell. 

iS(econd and fourth Saturdays, 

NORTH WARREN, 1025. 

W. B. Porter, Warren. 

Mrs. W. D. Vinton, Warren. 

Mac Olney, Warren. 

First and third Saturday, 1.30 p. m., 

P. H. C. Hall. 

SCANDIA, 1042. 

David Erickson, Scandia. 

Mis^ Vivian Anderson, Scandia. 

John Chimbery, Scandia. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Scandia. 

WATSON, 1068. 

S. J. Snavly, ^Warren, R. D. No. 40. 

Chas. Arp, Warren, R. D. No. 4. 

Bertha Wilcox, Warren, R. D. No. 4. 
Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings. Grange Hall. 

LIMESTONE, 1090. 

Dewalt Wiles, Tidioute. 

Miss Ethel Goldthwaite, Tidioute, 

Miss Grace Bimber, Tidioute. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

PLEASANT, 1143. 

Otto Marker, Warren, 408 Laurel St. 
Miss Louise Schearer, Warren. 
Leon J. Schearer, Warren. 

First and third Saturday evenings. 

Grange Hall, 

NEW LONDON, 1151. 



32 



A. C. Daelhousen, Tidioute. 

Second and fourth Saturday even- 
ings. Grange Hall. 



WASHINGTON-WAYNE 



MOUNTAIN, 1152. 

C. K. Morrison, Tidioute. 

Miss Nellie E. Owens, Tidioute. 

Minnie Morison, Tidioute. 

First and third Saturday evenings, 

Grange Hall. 

C50RYD0N, 1205. 

Roswell Canfield, Corydon. 
Effle Reeves, Corydon. 
A. W. Reeves, Corydon. 

Second and fourth Monday evenings 

I. O. O. F. Hall. 

ALLEGHENY, 1208. 

C. R. Morrison, Kinzua. 
Maude Anderson, Kinzua. 
Maude English, Kinzua. 

First and third Friday evenings, L. 
O. T. M. Hall. 

EAST BRANCH, 1262. 

D. Fitch, Grand Valley, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. John Brightman, Spartansburg, 

Crawford County. 
Charlie Kent, Spartansburg. Crawford 

County, R. D. No. 8 5. 
First and third Saturdays, East 
Branch. 

WASHINGTON 

INDEPENDENCE, 179. 

C. P. Buckman, Independence. 
Frank Buxton, Avella, R. D. No. 2. 
.T. B. Painter, Avella, R. D. No. 2. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

First Friday, Grange Hall, 

JEFFERSON, 314. 

J. D. Kuhns, Burgettstown. 

Mrs. Mary C. Marquis, Hanlin, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Annie E. Martin, Burgettstown, R. D. 

No. 4. 
P. A. — ^Secretary. 

Last Saturday, 1 p. m.. J. T. Mar- 
quis's. 

AMWELL, 1055. 

Grant Moninger, Washington, R. D. 

No. 4. 
R. M. Day, Washington, R. D. No. 7. 

D. C. Day, Washington, R. D. No. 5. 
Second Thursday evening. 

CHESTNUT RIDGE, 1133. 

V. A. Mowl. Washington. R. D. No. 4. 
Mrs. G. W. Crile, Washing, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Miss Netta Moninger, Washington, R. 
D. No. 4. 
Last Thursday evening, homes of 
members. 

TURKEY FOOT, 1164. 

D. F. Higbee, Venitia, R. D. No. 1. 
Mrs. J. H. Cheesman, Venitia, R. D. 

No. 1. 
L. E. Linn, Venitia, R. D. No. 1. 
P. A. — W. B. Gallev, Finleyville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Monday evening. Grange Hall. 



WAYNE 

HOPE, 898. 

G. W. Dersheimer, Varden. 
H. H. Shaffer, South Canaan. 
L. A. Barhight, Gravity. 

Alternate Fridays, South Canaan. 

UNION, 977. 

Geo. Tisdal, Ariel. 
Joseph Quinton, Ariel. 
H. R. Samson, Ariel. 

First and third Wednesdays, school 

house. 

PRESTON, 990. 

W. J. T^loyd, Winwood. 
Susie Bennett, Winwood, 
W. C. Rutledge, Winwood. 
P. A. — 'Secretary. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

SOUTH PRESTON, 1005. 

S. B. Doyle, Poyntelle. 
W. E. Perham, Nmgara. 
Mrs. S. B. Doyle, Poyntelle. 
P. A. — W. H. Doyle, Poyntelle. 

First and third Saturdays, Grange 

Hall. 

MOOSIC, 1041. 

W. C. Norton, Aidenville. 

Mrs. L. M. Grote, Farno. 

W. E. Rude, Forest- City. 

P. A. — ^N. Giswold, Forest City. 

Second and fourth Thursdays, 

Grange Hall. 

REAPER, 1048. 

S. H. Hine, Orson. 
T. W. Hine, Orson. 

E. D. Drake, Orson. 

P. A. — W. B. Heny, Orsno. 
Last Saturday, Grange Hall. 

CHAMPION, 1062. 

August Appel, Carley Brook. 
Geo. L. Knorr, Girdland. 

F. Ivan Knorr, Girdland. 
P. A.I — Lecturer. 

Alternate Saturday evenings, Gird- 
land. 

CHERRY RIDGE, 1071. 

I. F. Taylor, Cherry Ridge. 
Charlotte C. Dirlam, Cherry Ridge. 
Jno. A. Poster, Cherry Ridge, 

Alternate Saturdays,Clark's Corners. 

PLEASANT VALLEY, 1074. 

W. J. Ogden, Dyberry. 

W. H. Bullock, Honesdale, 

Mrs. O. E. Bunnell, Honesdale, 

P, A. — ^Lecturer. 

Second and fourth Fridays, Dy- 
berry, 

BEECH GROVE, 1089. 

Edgar Bryant, Prompton, 
E, E. Kinsman, Prompton. 
Harry M. Blake, Honesdale. 
P. A. — ^C. O. Blake, Honesdale, 

First and second Wednesdays, 

Beech Grove, 



33 



WESTMORELAND-WYOMING. 



WESTMORELAND 

WAUKENA, 90. 

S. L. Adair, Saltsburg, R. D. No. 3, 

Indiana County. 
H. K. Johnson, Saltsburg, R. D. No. 4, 

Indiana County. 
A. M. Love, Saltsburg, R. D. No. 3, 

Indiana County. 
First Friday, Grange Hall. 

SEWICKLEY, 704. 

W. F. Holtzer, Greensburg, R. D. No. 

1. 
W. S, Crosby, Green?iburg, R. D. No. 1. 
H. H. Holtzer, Greensburg, R. D. No. 

1. 
P. A. — Master. 

First Saturday, W. F. Holtzer's. 

UNITY, 793. 

J. R. Truxal, Greensburg, R. D. No. 6. 



Mrs. J. R. Truxal, Greensburg, R. t>. 
No. 6. 

CENTRAIj, 835. 

C. D. Eisman, Greensburg. 
E. M. Bair, Greensburg. 

D. B. Fisher, Mt. Ph asant. 
Second Friday, Youngwood. 

KEYSTONE. 818. 

H. J. Fink, Claridge. 



H. Albert Lauffer, Harrison City. 
First Saturday, Hai-i-ison City. 

MENDON, H'y'y. 

W. P. Keller, RufEsdale. 
J. H. Bryan, Ruffsdale. 
J. W. Lawstetter, Ruffsdale. 
Second Saturday, Mendon. 

GOOD INTENT. 862. 

Wilson S. Wigle, Greensburg, R. D. 

No. 4. 
J. W. Lingal, Greensburg, R. D. No. 

4. 
Mary J. Smith, Greensburg. R. D. No. 
3. 
Second and fourth Monday evenings 
Grange Hall. 

EUREKA, 1011. 

Tm E. Keller, Summit Mines. 
D. S. Love, Scottdale. 
W. C. Myers, Scottdale. 

First and third Saturdavs, Scottdale. 



WYOMING 



ORIENTAL, 165. 

J. V. Sturdevant, Mill City. 
Mrs. M. J. Swartz, Lake Winola. 
Mrs. Adda M. Prear, Lake Winola. 
P. A. — Mrs. L. 8. Jennings. Mill City. 

Second and fourtli Saturdays, Mill 

City. 



TUNKHANNOCK, 209. 

Geo. A. Benson, Tunkhannock. 
Ida Blanche Samson, Tunkhannock. 
Mrs. Marion Hermon, Eatonville. 
P. A. — iMaster. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m.. G. A. R. Hall. 

WEST NICHOLSON, 321. 

Chmas. D. Brown, Nicholson, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Mrs. Wm. Hrnry, Factoryville, R. D. 

No. 1. 
Clyde Travis, Factoryville, R. D. No. 

1. 
P. A. — H. C. Stark, Nicholson, R. D. 

No. 2. 
Second and fourth Saturdays, 
('range Hall. 



EAST LEMON, 400. 



L 



H. Cornell, Tunkhannock, R. D. 
No. 2. 
Mrs. Maggie Thomas, East Lemon. 
Mrs. Alice Pall, Factoryville, R. D. 
No. 1. 
Alternate Saturday, Jan. 13, etc.. 
East Lemon. 

KEISEKVILLE, 508. 

L. S. Prevost, Russell Hill. 
Mrs. L. S. Prevost, Russoil Hill. 
Mrs. Janette Alger, Tunkhannock, R. 
D. No. 1. 

Second and last Saturdays, 2 p. m., 

Grange Hall. 

MONROE, 641. 

E. H. Clark, Beaumont. 
Mrs. E. H. Clark, Beaumont. 
Stanley Jackson, Beaumont. 

Every Saturday evening, 1. O. O. P. 

Hall. 

BOWMAN'S CREEK, 820. 

J. C. Patton, Bowman's Creek. 
Emily May, Bowman's Creek. 
Ei'win Evans, Jenks. 

First and second Saturday, Lutes 

Hall. 

VERNON, 842. 

Chas. L. He.ss, Centremorelandl 
Miss May Sickler, Vernon. 
Chas. L. Hess, Vernon. 

Saturday evening, hall at Vernon. 

MESHOPPEN, 926. 

i\ T. Arntz, Me,shoppen. 

Mrs. F. H. Fassett, Meshoppen, R. D. 

- No. 2. 
Jeannette Bunnell, Skinner's Eddy, R. 
D. No. 1. 
Setond Saturday, M'feshoppen. 

.MEHOOPANY, 1139. 

(\ W. Dawson, Wimble; 

Mrs. Clara Walter, Mehoopany. 

M. H. June, DeckerVille. 



34 



First and Third Saturdays, 
lioopany. 



Me- 



\ 



YORK-JUVENILE GRANGES. 



FORKjSTON, 1153. 

C. B. Passett, Forkston. 
J. P. Evans, Forkston. 
S. T. Fassett, Forkston. 
P. A. — Secretary. 

First and third Fridays. 

FACTORYVIL.LE, 1245. 

A. D. Gardner, Factoryville. 
Horace Seamans, Factoryville. 
Miss Cora Proper, Factoryville. 
P. A. — N. R. Gardner and Frank 
Gardner, Factoryville. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings, 

Factoryville. 

UNITY, 1249. 

J. W. Stroud, Skinner's Eddy. 
Mrs. H. D. Wilson, Skinner's Eddy. 
Mrs, Myrtle S. Cline, Laceyville. 

First and third Saturdays, K of P. 

HMl. 

LOVELTON, 1250. 

John O'Mara, Stowell. 

F. J. Spaulding, Forkston. 

Arthur Sharpe, Jenningsville. 

Second and fourth Saturdays, 2 p. 

m.. Grange Hall. 



WASHINGTON, 1261. 

Courtney N. Snyder, Nicholas. 

Mrs. H. N. Snyder, Hop Bottom, Sus* 

quehanna County. 
Mrs. Courtney Snyder, Nicholson. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings, 

I. O. O. F. Hall. 



YORK 



GIDEON, 810. 

H. Oscar Lange, Hanover, R. D. No. 1. 
A. L. Serff, Hanover, R. D. No. 1, 
Miss Martha E. Bowman, 585 Balti- 
more St., Hanover. 

Second and fourth Friday evenings, 

Grange Hall, Hanover, 

EXCELSIOR, 1270. 

W. S. Newcomer, Glen Rock. 
Mrs. A. E. Newcomer, Glen Rock. 
A. W. Newcomer, Glen Rock. 
First Saturday, Glen Rock. 



JUVENILE GRANGES. 



Xcw Veriioii, No. 608, Mercer County. 

Oiville McCartney, Clark's Mills. 
Montie McCartney, Clark's Mills. 
I^emucl Clark, Clark's Mills. 

Spring Hill, No. 178, Bradford County. 

Gerald Shumway, Lacyville, R, D. No. 

3 7. Wyoming County. 
Harriet Taylor, Lacyville, R. D. No. 

3 7, Wyoming County. 
Floyd Snyder, Lacyville, R. D. No. 

3 7, Wyoming County. 

Columbia, No. 83, Bradford County. 

Mabel Watkins, Columbia X Roads, 

R. D. No. 61. 
Libbie Harkne^s, Columibia X Roads, 

R. D. No. 5 9. 
Ruth Bullock, Columbia X Roads, R. 

D. No. 61. 



Mrs. Will Canfleld, matron, Columbia 
X Roads, R. D. No. 61. 

Rose Bud. 

L<etha Wainman, Coryville, McKean 

County. 
Eva Stull, Coryville, McKean County. 
Joseph Haynes, Coryville, McKean 

County. 

Fishing Creek Juvenile Grange. 

Iceland Atkins,Roul©tte,Potter County. 

Valeria Church, Roulette, Potter 
County. 

Effle Baker, Roulette, Potter County. 

Matron — Mrs. Bertella Atkins, Rou- 
lette, Potter County. 

Asst. Matron^ — ^Nina Tauscher, Rou- 
lette, Potter County. 







1r-— ■• 









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Officers of tHe Pennsylvania State Grange 

Master, W.F.HILL, Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 

Overseer,- HON. A. C. BARRETT, NewMilford, Susquehanna Co. 

Lecturer, A. M. CORNELL, Columbia X Roads. 

Steward, THEODORE KLEIN, Lake Ariel, Wayne. Co. 

Assistant Steward, HARRY H. PRATT, Goshenville, Chester Co. 

Chaplain, REV. J. W. JOHNSON, Laceyville, Wyoming Co. 
Treasurer, S. E. NIVIN, Landenburg, Chester Co. 
Secretary, J. T. AILMAN, Thompsontown, Juniata Co. 
Gatekeeper, WALLACE CHASE, Fall Brook, Tioga Co. 
Ceres, MRS. VELMA WEST, Corry, Warren County. 
Flora, MRS. J. S. DALE, State College, Centre Co. 
Pomona, MRS. MARY FISHE R, Lincoln University, Chester Co. 
L. A. S., MRS. FRANCES B. ARTERS, MiUvillage, Erie Co. 



Executive Committee 

I. FRANK CHANDLER, Toughkenamon, Chester Co. 

C. H. DILDINE, Rohrsburg, Columbia Co. 

G. W. OSTER, Osterburg, Bedford Co. 



Finance Coinmittee 

D. B. MoWILUAMS, Bumham, Mifflin Co. 

S.B. BROWN, Sulphur Springs, Bedford Co. 

J OHN T. PATTON, Warriors Mark, Huntingdon Co. 



I^e^^islative Committee 

W. F.HILL. Chambersburg, Franklin Co. 
HON. W. T. CREASY, Catawissa, Columbia Co. 
E. B. DORSETT, Wellsboro, Tioga Co. 



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VOL. II, No, 8 



MARCH, J906 



25 Cbnts pbr Year 
5 Cents per Coft 



W. F. HILIL., 

Editor. 
Q. W. OS^TER, W. T. CREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. Editor IvCgislative Committee Department 



Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered January 13, 1906, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879, 



The State faster to Pomona Grange Masters* 



Worthy Master : — 

At the last session of the Penn'a. 
State Grange a resolution was pre- 
sented by Bro. E. R. Mulford, Wells- 
boro Grange, 1009, Tioga County, 
reading as follows : "Whereas, There 
are in our State thousands of ani- 
mals, birds, insects, etc., whose na- 
tures have never been studied as to 
their usefulness or injurious effects 
upon agriculture, and, 

"Whereas, There are many insects, 
birds, etc., within the bounds of Penn- 
sylvania that are known to be bene- 
ficial or injurious. Therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That the Pennsylvania 
State Grange hereby instructs State 
Master, W. F. Hill, to appoint three 
members as a Zoological Committee, 
to act under the direction of the 
Economic Zoologist of the Agricultur- 
al Department of Pennsylvania, in su- 
pervising the collecting and furnish- 
ing of specimens from our Pomona 
and Subordinate Granges and to fur- 
ther nature study among our mem- 
bers." The resolution was amended, 
however, so as to read that instead of 
three members constituting this Com- 
mittee, it should be made up of one 
person from each county. 

Worthy Master, I want your help in 
selecting from your County some one 
who takes an interest in work of this 
character, and who will make a prop- 



er effort for its advancement. Will 
you not, therefore, please write to me 
soon and nominate one or two or 
three naembers who you think are 
qualified to do this work ? From the 
members you nominate the appoint- 
ment will he made. Please indicate 
with his name and address the name 
and number of the Grange of which 
he is a member as well as the county. 
Where the Pomona district is com- 
posed of two counties your nomina- 
tions should represent members In 
both of those Counties. 

The Sisters are eligible and It Is 
hoped that the nominations shall be 
divided between the sexes. 

Send in your names, Worthy Master, 
so y^^ your County may be included 
and the name and address of your 
Committeemen will appear with the 
others in the next issue of Penn'a 
Grange News." As Bro. Mulford has 
taken an earnest interest in develop- 
ing the matter in Tioga County Po- 
mona he is hereby recognized as the 
first appointee under the provisions 
of the resolution. In this connection 
it may be interesting to show here 
what is being done by the Zoological 
Committee of Pomona Grange, No. 
30, of Tioga County. They send out a 
packet of vegetable or flower seeds 
without cTiarge to the membership, 
eacTi one being accompanied by the 
following circular : 



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PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



To All Members of the Gi-ange in Ti- 
oga County, Pa : — 

The Zoological Committee of Tioga 
"County Pomona Grange, No. 30, as a 
first lesson in Nature Study among 
•our membership, request that the ac- 
companying packets of vegetable 
and flower seeds, be divided among 
the younger members in Grange fam- 
ilies in each Subordinate Grange in 
the county, and the results reported 
.as follows : 

Note the time of planting. The 
rtime it takes to germinate. How it 
) first appears and what growth it 
makes each week. 

Hoi long it takes for the first bud 
r to appear. 

How soon blossoms appear there- 
. after. 

The numlber of blossoms. 

Time it takes seed pods or fruit 
.to appear and ripen. 

Note what insects work on the 
.'plant, injurious or otherwi'Se, and all 
other data possible. 

Reports, with specimens of vege- 
tables and flowers, should be sent to 
the September, 1906, session of Po- 
mona Grange, when prizes will be 
awarded. \ 

A list of the prizes for the above 
will be announced at the June, 1906, 
session of Pomona Grange. 

The seed for these experiments 
were put up for the committee, free 
of charge, by Henry Field, Seedsman, 
Shenandoa'h, Iowa, at the Request of 
■the "Republican Advocate," of "Wslls- 
boro. Pa. Mr. Field wouild be pleased 
to mail his catalog to every farmer in 
\Tioga County. 

E. R. MUL.FORD, 
t Chairman of Committee, 

"i Wellsboro, Pa. 

I G. STONE, Secretary. 
March 8, 1906. 



Now Copies of the Grange Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws. 

The State Secretary now has for 
Bale new copies of the Constitution 
and By-Laws complete in book form. 
These contain Declaration of pur- 
poses of the Patrons of Husbandry, 
■Constitution of the National Grange, 
By-Lawis of the National Grange.Con- 
etitution of the Penn'a. State Grange, 
suggestive By-Laws for Subordinate 
Granges subject to adoption or 
amendment to suit local conditions of 
Granges, Constitution of Pomona 
Granges, By-Laws for Pomona 
•Oranges and a parliamentary guide. 

You will find the price of these In the 
•price list elsewhere in this issue. It 
at our intention to publish this matter 



in different issues of Penn'a Grange 
News. It would take up too much 
space to publish it all in one issue, 
but by filing these different copies of 
the magazine, every reader will have 
the Constitutions and By-Laws com- 
plete. Qf course, you will want to 
file the magazine any way as every 
number contains matter of permanent 
value to every wide awake Patron. 

If you wish to get these Constitu- 
tions complete under one cover, re- 
member the Worthy State Secretary 
has them for sale. 



Register for 1906. 

Patrons who desire to see the new 
Register are advised that three copies 
of it were mailed to each subordinate 
Grange Master March 15. These are 
for the use of your Grange and the 
W. Master was requested to place one 
copy with the Lecturer, one with the 
Secretary and to retain the other 
himself. Three copies were sent for 
each Grange instead of one as in 
previous years. These should be 
guarded that they do not fall into the 
hands of those not authorized to have 
them. They are for the use of your 
own Grange only, and are not to be 
loaned or given outside. 



Government Seed DistriJ)ution Should 
he Restricted. 

The question of free distribution of 
seeds from the Department of Agri- 
culture is having its usual airing. 
This is but another form of graft 
by which the Congressman hopes to 
graft himself into his position for an- 
other term. Two hundred and ninety 
thousand dollars was appropriated 
for this purpose last year, but it 
does not represent by any means the 
total cost to the government. Per- 
haps it is not more than one-fourth 
of the entire expense. The writer be- 
lieves that this should ibe stopped at 
once and tlie million or more dollars 
that the Governmenit would save be 
devoted to establishing parcels post, 
improving the present postal facil- 
ities and to bring this imiportant de- 
partment of the United State Govern- 
ment up somewhere near to a level 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



with foreign countries. Suc*l waste 
of putolic money as this tends to con- 
vince the laymen that miembers of 
Congress could find plenty of money 
to give us parcels post and other 
necessaries if they would do away 
with some of the extravagances 
which continue to prevail at Wash- 
ington without any particular benefit 
to the general public. 

The original intent was just to send 
seed's of new varieties to different 
parts of the United States, that they 
might be tested on our different soils 
and in the various climates and have 
results reported. Several Granges — 
two of them State Granges — have 
passed resoiutions against continuing 
the present farce. We append those 
adopted last December by the Illi- 
nois State Grange. They fit the case 
first rate : 

"Resolved, as practical and inde- 
pendent farmers, that we call upon 
the congress to abolish its petty, an- 
noying and needless practice of 
broadcasting free, common garden 
seeds all over the rural districts, and 
we aSk that the control of seed distri- 
bution be placed under the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and limi4;ed to 
experimental work." 



About "Grange News" Items. 

It has been said that the news- 
paipers are willing to publish Grange 
news if they can get it. I think this 
Is true, particularly in those counties 
where the Grange has a strong mem- 
bership. Quite a number of our Sub- 
ordinate Granges already have corre- 
spondents for the local papers, and 
if you have not such you should ap- 
point one immediately. These items 
must be such as will interest mem- 
bers of the Order throughout the 
State and not merely in your own lo- 
cality, such, for instance, as relate 
to co-operation in selling or purchas- 
ing farm products or farm supplies, 
plans for new Grange halls, dedica- 
tion of Grange halls, brief synopses of 
some of the best papers read on 
timely subjects, in fact, anything that 
you think would interest members of 
other Granges. To be available, such 
items shoiiid be sent to the State 
Editor while they are fresh. Do 
not delay. Whenever you have an 



Item you consider a good one, 8end»^^ 
it along to Penn'a. Grange News. 

In connection with the above It will - 
loe remembered that a resolution was 
passed by the State Grange requestinff- 
the Worthy State Master to appoint 
a "practical newspaper worker to acr 
as State Editor of news to be furnish- 
ed to papers outside our organization. 
Resolved, further, That, we request 
each Pomona Grange to elect one of 
its memibers to act as Pomona corres- 
pondent. Resolved, That we request 
each Subordinate Grange to appoint a 
member as Subordinate Grange cor- 
respondent." These resolutions were- 
adopted. As Bro. Ailman has been* 
acting in this capacity for a couple 
of years, he has been asked to con- 
tinue. Instead of sending out a sep- 
arate sheet to the various newspapers 
of the State his matter will appear in 
Penn'a. Grange News under his own 
heading, "Nuggets from the State 
Secretary," and will be sent to the 
newspapers of the State that have 
asked to have the matter furnished 
them. Each newspaper is privileged 
to use anything it desires fron» 
the pages of Penn'a Grange News, but 
this department will be conducted' 
primarily in their interest. Bro. All- 
man's ability in this line of work In- 
sures us all that it will be well 
handled. The Secretary's oflSce seems 
to be the logical head for this work 
as Pomona and Subordinate Granges 
are in such frequent communication 
with It. It now rests with each Sub- 
ordinate and Pomona Grange to elect 
or appoint some one to take up this 
special work and act as Its corres- 
pondent. This publication has been 
enlarged in size and is now In position 
to handle more matter. 

Through this arrangement these 
Grange Items will reach the more 
than three hundred newspapers to 
which Penn'a Grange News Is reg- 
ularly sent. If items from it do not 
appear in your County papers try 
suggesting to the Editor that Penn'a. 
Grange News will furnish them to 
him free of charge and that his read- 
ers would like to see this Grange mat. 
ter in his columns. L.et us encourage 
the use of printers' ink for the dis- 
semination of Grange principles and 



PBNNSYL.VAINIA GRANGE NEWS 



Grange news all fhat we can. It pays 
to advertise, you ktiow. 



Re-instatiiig a Member. 

In regard to your inquiry as to 
where the young man who had for- 
merly been a member of your Grange 
should apply for re-lnstatement as 
he now desires to affiliate with the 
Order in another County, I have to 
say that he should apply for re-in- 
statement in your Grange. He form- 
erly had membership with you. Your 
Grange has all the records as to his 
relations with your Grange and State 
dues were paid upon him by your 
Grange. He should send the money 
for reinstatement (and it is suggested 
that you pass a resolution to re-In- 
state on payment of one year's back 
dues, one dollar and twenty cents, for 
those who have been unaffiliated for 
a longer period than one year) and 
then taking a demit card from your 
Grange present it with his application 
to the Grange he wishes to Join. See 
last issue of Penn'a. Grange News as 
to the manner for receiving a person 
on demit card. You will find the col- 
umns of this publication helpful to 
you in your work throughout the year 
as many perplexing problems arise in 
the administration of affairs in a 
Grange. 



BE TRUE. 




Dear Sir and Bro : 

AM in receipt of yours of 
the 20th inst., inquiring 
whether it is legal for your 
Grange to pass a resolu- 
tion releasing the Sisters 
from the payment of any portion or 
all of their diues to the Subordinate 
Grange. You also inquire whether In 
the event of this being legal the Sub- 
ordinate Grange should pay dues on 
the Sisters to the State Grange. I 
have to say in reply that every mem- 
ber of every Subordinate Grange In 
affiliating with that Grange obligates 
himself or herself to support the Com- 
stltutlon and By-laws of our Order. 
One of the basic requirements of our 
Order Is that each member shall pay 
not less than ten cents per month 



dues to the Subordinate Grange In 
which he has membership. This 
makes an annual sum of one delliBjr 
and twenty cents ($1.20) that each 
member Is expected to pay to the 
Subordinate Grange and out oif this 
amount the Subordinate Grange Sec- 
retary is to remit twenty-eight cents 
to the State Grange Secretary. The 
State Grange Secretary in turn sends 
five cents of that amount to the Sec- 
retary of the National Grange. 

Returning again to the propo- 
sition you present, I have to say that 
the iSubordinate Grange does not have 
authority to relieve any memiber '^ 
of the payment of these minimum 
dues, viz : ten cents per month. 
Should any Suhordinaite Grange 
countenance such a proceeding it 
would be in direct violation of the 
laws of an order, and would 
render itself liable to have its 
charter revoked. I cannot conceive 
how the members of any Grange 
would knowingly become a party to 
the violation of their own pledge and 
obligation. Surely no self-respecting 
member of any Grange after volun- 
tarily pledging himself to support the 
rules of our Order could so far for 
get his self-respect as to knowingly 
violate his obligation. No ! no ! my 
Brother; you and I cannot sell our 
honor and degrade ourselves. Surely 
not for the paltry sum of a portion or 
all of the ten cents a month which are 
the minimum dues to be paid by 
every member of every Subordinate 
Grange without regard to age or sex. 

When an obligation is assumed and 
a pledge given, let us so long as it 
remains binding upon us, be true to 
ourselves, then we cannot be false to 
others. Banish at once and forever all 
thought of any such temptation that 
would mar your honor and stain 
your soul. 

Let us rememiber that a worthy 
"Patron places faith In God." Such a 
Patron will always be true. 

Very fraternally yours, 




Master State Grange. 



PENNSYLVANIA aRANGE NEWS 



Bradford and Smllivan Counties 
heldi series of Grange meetings ad- 
dressed by tliat veteran member of 
the Grange and builder of the Order, 
Bro. Mortimer Whitehead, of New 
Jersey, who is now honored and loved 
by so many Patrons throughout the 
length and breadth of this fair 
land. 

At nearly every Grange a public 
meeting was held either in the after- 
noon or evening to interest those who 
should become identified with the 
Order, and also a private meeting the 
same day to impart valuable informa- 
tion relative to the unwritten work and 
symbolism, on which Bro. Whitehead 
has no equal, giving to those mem- 
bers, who have the privilege of hear- 
ing him, many new and higher ideas 
of the teachings and principles of the 
Order. 

Should other counties desire to ar- 
range for a similar series for this 
grand champion of "Our Order, Our 
Country, and Mankind," he may be 
addressed as to same. New Bruns- 
wick, N. J., or I will aid if possible 
in arranging with you for him. 



The matter of having a Grange de- 
partment or column in local papers 
should receive attention by Subord- 
inate and Pomona Granges, as mudi 
helpfulness in some vicinities comes 
from this kind of work as it keeps the 
memibersiinformed of what Is transpir- 
ing from time to time, thereby hold- 
ing their interest, and placing Grange 
knowledge and information through 
the local paper into the imany homes 
of those not affiliated with the Order 
and have not the means of knowing 
perhaps that there is even a Grange 
in their county. 

To the end that action may be tak- 
en along these lines, I would sug- 
gest at the next session of your Sub- 
ordinate or Pomona Grange a com- 
mittee be appointed to investigate as 
to- getting this work started in your 
community. Local papers, as a rule, 
-«Cre willing to print Grange news of 
a local character and it results In a 
mutual helpfulness of great value. 



New York l^tate Grange. 

The late session held at Geneva, . 
February 6-9, was one of the largest^ 
and moat thorooighly business meet- - 
toga of its kind ever held to New^ 
York State. 

Good fellowship and harmony pre- 
vailed through it all. More than five 
thousand members were added during 
the year. Four hundred and twenty 
in the class for the beautiful degree 
of Flora. 

President Schurman, of Cornell 
University, delivered an address of 
exceptional interest, commending in 
no uncertain language the work of the 
Grange. 

The retiring State Master,Bro. E. B. 
Norris, was presented with a beauti- 
ful gold watch and chain. Bro. Geo. 
A. Fuller, the newly elected Master 
was born in Philadelphia, N. Y., Jan. 
13th, 1867, on Englewood farm, where 
(he still resides with his family, the 
farm having been In the Fuller fam- 
ily for four generations and now sup- 
ports a dairy of sixty cows. 

The State Officers were impressive- 
ly Installed by National Lecturer, Geo. 
W. F. Gaunt, assisted by Past Nation- 
al Lecturer, Mortimer Whitehead. 

Pennsylvania Patrons extend fra- 
ternal greetings and best wishes for 
continued success in the great work 
of the Order to the vast memibership 
in the Empire State. 



Questions to Ck>naider. 

The best method of using the 
Grange organization to improve laws 
and the enforcement of neglected 
laws ? 

Why should a parcels post be es- 
tablished by the Government ? 

Are printed yearly programs for 
use in a Subordinate Grange desir- 
able for best results ? 

If our Grange Is to have a success- 
ful Grange picnic during 1906, how 
early should we commence to ar- 
range for it ? 



—The UsefHl Toad. 

In France toads are sold to garden- 
ers by the dozen. They are in great 
depiand because of their usefulness 
as destroyers of injurious insects. 



PEJNNSTLVAiiTIA GRANOE NEWS 



^egishtive ^an(miUee ^e^^rtmrnt 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 




mm 



Shall Trolleys Carry Freight and Ex- 
press in Pennsylvania ? 

HE STATE GMlAlNOB wants 
this qiuestion settled in the 
affirmative. It is wrong in 
principle that this State 
should) have laws enabling 
the steam railroads to have a monop- 
oly of carrying freight. Break down 
that monopoly "and see how quick 
you will stop discrimination in 
freight rates. See how quiok.too, the 
freight and express ohargets will be 
lowered on short hauls to a reason- 
able amount. "Live and let live" is 
an American principle. Let us see 
to it that this doctrine be not 
trampled under foot. It deserves per- 
peltuation. 

In harmony with the above the 
State Master has sent the following 
letter to the W. M. of each Subordin- 
ate Grange in the State : 

Chambersburg, Pa., Mar. 19, 1906. 
Worthy Master and Brother: 

The State Orange has for years 
stood for having the right to carry 
freight accorded to trolleys in our 
State. There is, perhaps, no move- 
ment to-day of suich vital importance 
which would contribute so generally 
and fully to the welfare of the agri- 
cultural interests of our Common- 
wealth as this. It promises hope of 
early realizajtion. 

The State Grange is about to enter 
upon a vigorous campaign to secure 
this right, and I write to enlist your 
active personal interest, that of your 
Grange, and of your entire commu- 
nity, in carrying on this movement. 

To insure success, we must, each 
one of us, get into the fray with out 
coats off, and leave no stone un- 
turned that will add strength to our 
position, and increase the force of 
our demand. This right can be grant- 
ed only through Legislative enact- 
ment. It is, therefore, imperative 
that we carry the contest right to the 
conventions and the polls. A plank 
should be inserted in the platform of 
the different political parites in your 
county, pledging that party to give 
to electric railways the right to carry 
freight and express matter. 

Urge every member of your Grange 
and every voter in your locality to 
see to it that a resolution is passed in 



the county convention of the party of 
his choice, favorable to granting to 
electric roads the right to carry 
freight and express matter. 

The New Jersey State Grange is 
conducting an aggressive campaign 
in that State, in conjunction with 
other agricultural organizations.to re- 
store to trolley companies the right to 
carry freight. They originally had it 
there, but were deprived of it some 
years ago. For your information, I 
enclose copies of their resolutions. 

The passage of the trolley freight 
bill in Pennsylvania will benefit our 
farms and rural communities, and re- 
sult in extending transportation fa- 
cilities into rural districts now de- 
void of sufficient population to war- 
rant lines for passenger business only. 
Get all your local newspapers inter- 
ested in this movement. They can 
help us immensely. 

iPlease keep me fully advised of 
what you do and of your progress. 

The following preamble, resolu- 
tions and reasons were submitted to 
the New Jersey Legislature under the 
leadership of Committees of the N. J. 
State Grange, Board of Agriculture 
and Horticultural Society. A big 
demonstration was made at thie time 
at Trenton. 

The bill then was passed by the 
Senate and has since passed the 
House. 

Whereas, it is of vital importance 
to the people of this State that the 
right formerly held by Electric Rail- 
way Companies to carry freight shall 
be restored to them iby the enactment 
of appropriate legislation, which de- 
sirable result will be effected by the 
passage and enactment of Senate Bill 
No. 91, now before the Senate Com- 
mittee on Railroads and Canals: 
■' (Resolved, that the organization 
shall and does hereby express its un- 
qualified approval of such legislation 
and earnestly urge its enactment for 
the following reasonss: 

I. The right of electric railways 
to carry freight in the neighboring 
states where such rights exist has re- 
sulted in the extension of vast net- 
works of railway lines through rural 
districts previously without reason- 
able passenger or freight traffic fa- 
cilities, the population of which dis- 
tricts was insufficient to support the 
operation of steam railroads or of 
electric railways for passenger busi- 
ness only. 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



II. iSuch a development of electric 
railways in this State would enable 
our farmers to compete as hitherto 
they have been unable to compete 
with farmers of such states as New 
York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
Delawtare, Ohio, and Indiana, by en- 
abling them to load perishable fruit 
and produce on cars on their own 
sidings immediately adjoining their 
farms, as is the custom in these other 
states, instead of as at present neces- 
sitating the long and expensive hauls 
between farm and railroad freight 
station or market; and would mini- 
mize their dependence on weather 
conditions, the icondition» of the high- 
ways, and relieve them from the ex- 
pense of maintaining market teams, 
which, costing from six hundred dol- 
lars to eight hundred dollars each, re- 
quire the investment of much capital. 

III. Districts availabLe for dairy 
farms, which now are restricted to 
points adjacent to steam railroad sta- 
tions, could be developed and used as 
such with these transportation facili- 
ties, without which, from the nature 
of this product, they cannot so be 
used. 

IV. Rural prcperty representing 
millions of dollars in value, and the 
investments of thousands of citizens 
of this iState would be enhanced in 
value by the facildties thus obtained. 

V. Highways would be improved 
and congestion of street traffic would 
be relieved by the elimination of the 
use of them of the many wagons, the 
need for which would be supplied by 
the electric car carrying freight. One 
electric freight car has a carrying 
capacity equal to that of six market 
wagons. 

VI. Frequent and prompt trans- 
portation from farm to market, or 
from farm to railroad for long hauls, 
would make possible the loading and 
delivery of fruit, flowers, vegetables, 
eggs, and poultry in shorter time and 
better condition than could be possi- 
ble by any other means, and they 
would demand higher prices and at 
the same time give the greatest sat- 
isfaction to the consumer. Such re- 
sults cannot be possible in the case of 
produce subjected to the wagon 
hauls, to delays on station platforms, 
delays due to infrequent freight ser- 
vice, and to the congestion of freight 
on steam railroads, which to-day is 
more than they can handle. Cheap- 
ness of transportation as well as bet- 
ter service can toe assured; "hourly de- 
liveries can (he had in place of daily 
delivereies; orders by telephone can 
be answered and promptly filled to 
the profit and convenience of both 
producer and consumer, and the 
avoidance of dissatisfaction and de- 
lay under present conditions is inevi- 
table. 

VII. The widespread extension and 
operation .of electric railways will 
give employment to a large number 



of people who will make th^ir homes 
in districts now undeveloped. Ex- 
perience will show that the conse- 
quent development of such sections 
of the State by the extension of the 
electric railway increases rather than 
diminishes the earnings of the steam 
railroads. The electrc railway acts as 
an economical distributor of freight 
for the steam railroad; districts now 
contributing little to steam railroad 
freight earnings because of their re- 
moteness from freight stations will 
immediately become valuable pro- 
ducers and consumers of freight 
transported iby those railroads which 
they now cannot reach. 

VIII. A vast amount of territory 
in this State now restricted by lack 
of tranportation facilities to the rais- 
ing of grain, hay and like products 
whch can be raised much more 
cheaply elsewhere will.be immediate- 
ly available for the raising of pro- 
fitable produce and dairy products. 

IX. The extension of the electric 
railways through the rural districts, 
made possible by the enactment of 
this legislation, will, as it has in the 
other states, make available educa- 
tional facilities and promote social 
intercourse, now restricted in such 
communtiess as in this State. Chil- 
dren will not be subject to the great 
exposure and difficulty now met in 
attending their schools. 

X. The farmers have done more 
than their share in their liberal grants 
or rights of way to electric railways, 
which should not only be permitted 
but required to serve the public to the 
full extent of their facilities. To this 
important portion of the community 
both the Legislature and the railways 
owe an important and immediate 
duty. Their need for additional fre- 
quent quick freight service is urgent. 
They should not longer ibe deprived of 
it. The only reasons which can ibe 
urged against the passage of this leg- 
islation are those which are preju- 
dicial to the prosperity of citizens of 
ths State and to the development of 
our local commerce. 

XI. That these are the results ex- 
perienced in some states and antici- 
pated in others is manifest. The re^ 
suits in New York, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Delaware, Ohio, and 
Indiana are known. In Pennsylvania 
the need is recognized. Though in 
the recent special session of the Leg- 
islature of that State legislation w^'S 
restricted to subjects mentioned in 
the Governor's call convening such 
session, resolutions were adopted by 
both Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives urged by an ovenwhelming 
demand from their constituents all 
over the State, from the Pennsylva- 
nia State Grange and kindred organi- 
zations requesting the Governor to 
call another special session to enable 
the passage of just such legislation 



8 



t>ENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



as that now before the Legislature 
of New Jersey In regular session. 

Resolved further, That the present 
conditions existing in this State, as 
Indicated above, are unnecessary and 
should be remedied without delay by 
the encouragement of the extension 
af electric railways through the rural 
districts. Conditions in these dis- 
tricts have been somewhat improved 
by the telephone. They should not 
longer be deprived of the greater fa- 
cilities which 'the electric railway will 
give if encouraged by the necessary 
legslation. 



.FOUND — A I^JmUon Dollars for Assist- 
Jng in maintaining our Township 

The requirements placed on the 
'■'farmere of the State for better roads 
must bring with it some plan of get- 
tiftg money to meet the increased ex- 
penses. 

Under the State road law the Sfate 
puts up three-fourths of the cost for 
Improving the more important roads; 
hut whose money is it ? We are an- 
'Tiually paying to the State over three 
■and one-half millions of dollars in 
ilicense and personal property taxes 
Vhat by right belongs to the counties 
and municipalities where it is raised. 
And we are asking to have it returned 
where it belongs, so as to reduce local 
/taxation. It has been proved that per- 
■ isonal and corporate property are pay- 
ing an average of three mill tax on 
the dollar while real estate is paying 
'■^fteen mills. Hence it would only be 
fair to have the taxes on real estate 
^reduced. If any additional sum of 
• one million dollars can be put in the 
' treasury it should be uesd for roads. 
ilt has been stated that we spend 
Pannually $4,500,000.00 on our 100,000 
imiles of Township roads. Deduct- 
ing $1,000,000 would leave $3,500,000 
to be raised, or in othejr words the 
State could put up nearly 30 cents for 
every dollar we raised in money, pro- 
viding the road tax was paid in 

money. 

By an amendment to our State tax 
•laws, gas companies are exempt from 
(paying State taxes because the Su- 
preme Court decided that they were 
manufacturing corporations. Their 
competitors, electric light companies, 
are paying a tax to the State on their 
capital stock, bonded Indebtedness 



and gross earnings. To even up mat- 
ters, gas companies should pay the 
same taxes as electric light compa- 
nies, and if they did, it has been es- 
timated, that the tax raised from this 
source would amount to $675,000. To 
this should be added the cost of the 
State constabulary, by having that 
useless body dispensed with. In other 
words, repeal the law. They are not 
doing anything, nor can this band of 
Cossacks find anything to do. And it 
the law remains in force, ten chances 
to one this force of idlers will be in- 
creased. They are costing at present 
about $225,000 annually. Adding this 
cost to the tax on gas companies, we 
have the sum of $900,000. To this 
should be added the tax on automo- 
biles, say about $50,000. From the 
appropriation to the State Board of 
Health, to wit : $193,000 annually, a 
deduction of at least $50,000 could be 
made to the benefit of both the people 
■at large and the good roads fund in 
particular. There is $250,000 appro- 
priated for the building of Armories. 
'This is a mistake at this time, as this 
money could be used to better ad- 
vantage on the roads. Taking one- 
half this sum as the annual amount 
to be spent on these buildings and ad- 
ding it to the other sums, it would 
make a total annual amount of $1,- 
125,000. In all fairness, can any one 
point out why this plan as outlined 
should not be followed ? If any one 
can suggest any better plan to ac- 
complish this end in view without 
doing any injustice whatever to any 
of the interests of the State, i .rould 
. be glad to receive such suggestions. 
In a future article I will try to 
find another million or so of dollars 
for roads. 



Don't Forget. 

The Farmers' Platform is found on 
page 28 of the February number of 
the Grange News. We want to keep 
it before the people and see what can 
be done to carry out these measures 
by united effort and agitation during 
the coming campaign. 

To it should be added the limiting 
of Franchises. 

In the special session of the Legis- 
lature just ended, there was an 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



9 



amendment inserted by the writer in 
bridge bill which read as follows : 
"Provided that no leave or right of 
way of such county bridge shall ex- 
ceed a period of 'twenty-five years." 
This related to fixing a method of 
procedure for trolley roads crossing 
county bridges and was the first of its 
Icind put in a bill. It is the pioneer 
amendment on this matter. Minor 
matters may be added from time to 
time to the platform. 

I want to call the attention of the 
members of the Grange to the third 
plank in the platform, requiring cor- 
porations to live up to the Consti- 
tution. Whenever the people wanted 
laws enacted we were always met by 
the paid agents of the corporations, 
saying that we must 'be careful that 
we did not violate the Constitution. 
It was always this or that section of 
the Constitution 'that we were running 
up against. And strange as it may 
seem these very parties could nearly 
always give the Constitution an extra 
twist by the aid of able legal ability 
to allow corporations special privileg- 
es. When we asked in the last 
special session of the Legislature to 
have the Constitution enforced as 
against gross violations by great 
corporations we were informed that 
there were no laws on the Statute 
books to enforce it. These arguments 
wc'"^ not weighty. I believe that if 
it be determined in a court that the 
corporations are guilty, the penalty is 
ouster or quo warrants and several 
other writs would compel them to 
quit the illegal field instanter. But 
we will take them at their word and 
see that proper laws will be passed 
to enforce it. 

This plank relates particularly to 
Art. 17, of the Constitution. 

Section 4 of this article prohibits 
the consolidation of parallel or com- 
peting lines. This has been and is 
being violated. And it might be well 
in the bill granting trolleys the right 
to carry freight that something be 
Inserted to prohibit the steam roads 
from consolidating or owning the 
trolleys. 

Section 5 prohibits common car- 
riers from engaging in any other 
business than that of common carrier. 



Every one knows how this is violated^ 
Yet the flimsy argument is advanced 
that being born prior to the new con- 
stitution they are not under the law 
the Constitution. Without arguingf. 
the case, one thinks that the reader 
can see quick — "The courts will not 
enforce any private contract that is 
against public policy" — that is law. 
That being the case, how about pub- 
lic contracts ? the courts will cer- 
tainly not uphold public contracts 
that are a menace to the people. The 
constitution of 1873 did not contem- 
plate the covering of what now ex- 
ists. But suppose we admit that the 
constitution permits the carrying on 
of a business contrary to its provisions 
because it was started prior to its- 
birth. Take, for example, the coal 
mines, which the corporations owned' 
prior to 1873, but how about the^ 
mines and coal lands they have ac* ■ 
quired since that time ? 

Section 6 of article 17 prohibits the- 
ofl^cers of transportation companies of 
being interested in the furnishing ol 
material or supplies to such com- 
pany, yet this is being violated time 
and again. 

Section 7 says that "no discrimina-' 
tion in charge or facilities for trans- 
portation shall be made * * and 
no railroad shall make any prefer- 
ence in furnishing cars or motlvft 
power." I have at least 100 letters 
to prove that this is violated. The vio- 
lation of this clause has ruined ship- 
pers and has built up the coal trust. 
Since it has done all this, I am no* 
willing to admit that it has been 
placed by Divine Providence in thei 
hands of special guardians. 

Section 8 limits the granting of fre» 
passes and the railroads should have 
a credit mark for discontinuing them. 
It is a step upward, and toward a two- 
cent fare and .better laws. 

Section 10 reads : "No railroad^ 
canal or other transportation com- 
pany, in existence at the time of the 
adoption of this article, shall "have the 
benefit of any future legislation by 
general or special laws, except on 
condition of complete acceptance of 
all the provisions of this article.** 
How many railroads have not ha* 
legislation since the adoption of the 



10 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



new contitution ? 

Above and beyond all this, the 
people are the power and in one of 
the Grange's cases decided by the 
United States Supreme Court, the 
fundamental principle was laid down 
that the thing created is not greater 
than its creator. Corporations are 
acting in place of the government — 
they have special and extraordinary 
power conferred on them, not for 
their personal benefit, but for the pub- 
lic good. Under this view, a railroad 
corporation does not own the rail- 



road it operates in the same sense as 
a man owns his home. The^ State 
confers special privileges and the 
State can take or annul them. The 
railroads , are common carriers — not 
private. The law gives them life 
and the law says how they shall live. 
And the State Grange asks that they 
live up to the regulations outlined by 
the fundamental law of the State — 
the Constitution. 

W. T. CREASY, 

Sec. Leg. Com. 



STATE GRANGE LIFE INSURANCE 



The special committee on the suh- 

ject of a State Grange Life Insurance 

Company met at Harrisiburg during 

the week of January 22d, took up the 

above matter carefully and at length. 
There appeared before our meeting 
two experienced insurance men who 
presented for our consideration fhe 
following paper : 

"The question of organizing a State 
Grange Life Insurance Company 
which will be miutual in principle and 
practice, is one of the most import- 
ant which has ever come before this 
body. It is a fact which has be*^' 
most forcibly demonstrated by the 
New York Insurance investigation*? 
just completed that good sound, old 
line life insurance can be furnished 
for much less net cost than members 
are now paying. Instead of paying 
^aJlaries ranging from $50,000 per 
year upward to officers of the Com- 
pany, and paying 10 per cent, divi- 
dends on capital stock to stockholders 
who are not members of the Grange, 
we can pay moderate salaries to of- 
ficers, and by confining the hoMings 
of the stock to members of the 
Grange who carry policies with us, 
we can devote the Company's profits 
to the payiment of dividends on poli- 
cies and stock held by our own mem- 
bers. A cereful calculation sho'ws 
that we can furnish insurance on the 
old line basis at approximately the 
same rates that other Companies are 
charging, and at the same time guar- 
antee a reduction of 20 per cent, on 
eadh renewal premium. And) in addi- 
tion pay, at the expiration of the pol- 
icynperiods (10, 15 or 20 years and 
upwards), an accumulated dividend, 
the amount of which will be con- 
ditioned upon our economy of man- 
agement, the interest rate earned 
upon our economy of managrement, 



the interest rate earned upon invested 
assets and the savings in death losses 
which might occur when we insure 
only the best class of risks to be had, 
viz : responsible men and women who 
are engaged in the agricultural pro- 
fession. Our members will not be 
compelled to contribute to the ex- 
cessive mortality which Is inevitable 
where people following more or less 
hazardous occupations are admitted 
at the same rates as preferred risks. 

"A Pennsylvania Company will save 
its members 2 per cent, of all prem- 
iums colilected which is charged as a 
tax by the state upon foreign com- 
panies doing business here. Home 
Companies are exempt from this tax. 
Again, money invested in Pennsylva- 
nia securities is now bringing 5 per 
cent, and over. A two-year old Penn- 
sylvania Company earned last year 
exactly 5 per cent on their invest- 
ments in this state, while the Ne-vr 
York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and 
Connecticut Companies earned on an 
average only 4 per cent. This shows 
a total advantage of about 3 per cent. 
Did you ever stop to think what a dif- 
ference there is in favor of an ex- 
cess 3 per cent, on investments ? If 
you w^iJl take the trouble to calculate, 
you will find that if a man deposits 
$10 each year at 4 per cent, com- 
pound interest for twenty years, he 
will have a total at the end of that 
time amounting to $309.69. If he 
can get 3 per cent, more and make 
the deposit at 7 per cent., he will hav« 
$438.65 at the end of twenty years, 
an increase of $128.96. Pennsylva- 
nia investments,combined with Penn- 
sylvania savings will make juet that 
much difference in our favor. Is not 
this worth serious thought ? Our in- 
vestments are as good as the best, 
therefore, why not keep our capital 
at home ? We would, no doubt, be 
in a position to invest a large part of 
our money right among our own 
members. 



PENNSYLVANIA aRANGE NEWS 



11 



"Granting, (as we suppose you do) 
that we are rig-ht so far, the question 
arises, 'How may the organization of 
a Company be effected so as to com- 
ply with the law, assure the success- 
ful consummation of our plans, and 
secure all of the profits to the policy- 
holders ?' Your attention is called to 
the following : 

"The Insurance Law provides three 
ways of organizing a life insurance 
company. Ist. A mutua/1 company 
may be organized with a capital 
stock of $120,000, 50 per cent, of 
which, or $60,000, must be paid in. 
2. A stock comipany may be organ- 
ized with a capital stock of $300,000, 
all of which must be fully paid. 3d. 
An assessment Order may be formed 
by the payment of $10,000. ( To com- 
ply with either of the first two laws 
wolud be quite a large and expensive 
undertaking, because this amount of 
money cannot be raised without con- 
siderable work and good backing. In 
case of a stock company, it also 
means that we must remunerate the 
outsiders who put up the money, 
which would mean a continual outlay 
each year in the way of dividends on 
capital stock, and would give these 
outside stock-holders a voting privi- 
lege in connection with Vhe Company's 
affairs which would not be advisable 
or desirable. It is extremely doubt- 
ful that we would ever be able to 
retire the capital stock in order to 
place control in the hands of policy- 
holders except upon terms dictated 
by the stockholders, and these termsf- 
would doubtless be to the disadvant- 
age of the Company. 

"There is only one solution to the 
difllculty as we see it. We can start 
out an assessment Company by the 
payment of only $10,000 to protect 
our policies. We can raise this 
amount without trouble or expense 
among the Grange memibership, and 
immediately begin to sell policies to 
the members of the Grange on the 
assessment plan at" full old line prem- 
iums, exchangeable for regular old 
line policies in a company to be or- 
ganized. An option on one share of 
stock in the proposed new company 
can be contracted for with each mem- 
hex who buys a policy, and the stock 
should be sold to no outsiders. As 
soon as $300,000 in stock has been 
subscribed for in tTiis way by our 
memibers, we can organize the State 
Grange Life Insurance Compg,ny and 
turn over to each holder of an origin- 
al policy, a regular old line policy 
for which he will have previously 
paid at regular rates, and we will 
also turn over his stock certificate 
upon payment of the amount due on 
same. We suggest issuing stock of a 
par value of $25, and selling same for 
$5 above par In order to create a sur- 
plus. The next move Is to pay the 
original $10,000 for Its services and 



dismiss it. We will then have a Com- 
pany in which the stockholders are 
the policy holders and all be members 
of the Grange. 

"It is Important to put at the head 
of the company, men of absolute hon- 
or and Integrity. Quite as Important 
is the necessity of (having experienced 
and successful insurance men to di- 
rect the Company's affairs. The con- 
sequences of putting in the manage- 
ment, men who are not fully posted 
by years of practical experience in the 
insurance business, would be quite 
as disastrous as putting in dishonest 
men. The two essentials are the ones 
by which the Company will stand or 
fall — honest management, and capa- 
ble management. 

"A few words concerning the value 
of life insurance stock will not be out 
of place here. We quote : 

" 'The value of life insurance 
stock is perhaps too well known to 
need exemplifying, but for illustra- 
tion, one share of stock, par value 
$100 — issued in 1875 by the Pru- 
dential of New Jersey, has a market 
value to-day of $18,000.' 

"Taking the ten leading stock com- 
panies : the 'Aetna,' 'Metropolitan/ 
'Travellers,' 'Union Central,' 'Pruden- 
tial,' 'Michigan Mutual,' 'Germania,' 
'Equitable,' Manhattan,' and the 
'Home Life,' statistics clearly show 
that every person investing $100 in 
the capital stock of each of the above 
ten comipanies, at the time of the or- 
ganization, $1000.00 in all, would 
have received dividends for the 
whole time of over 50 per cent, an- 
nually, and in 1900 would have on 
hand securities of the market value 
of $34,500, all from the investment of 
$1,000. Patrons, don't you think 

your members ought to own some life 
insurance stock ? Would it not be a 
great thing for this institution if the 
members could participate both as 
policy holders and stock holders, and 
in that way save for themselves every- 
thing which there Is in the buisiness 
above actual cost ?" 



Penn'a. Grange News will publisAi 
other matter concerning the details of 
life insurance. We ask your careful 
and thoughtful attention to these ar- 
ticles to the end that you may fully 
understand this important question. 
We also want to get other ideas and 
views on the matter, both from our 
memibers and from others who care 
to express opinions and suggestions. 
Our columns will be open for a full 
discussion of the matter. 

Respectfully submitted by the 
Grange Committee on Life Insurance. 



12 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



GOLDEN THOUGHTS. 

By State Grange Chaplain, Rev. J. W. JOHNSON. 



We are living in an age which lays 
much emphasis upon the intellectual. 
With our excellent public school sys- 
'tem, which will soon, we trust, be 
^url'her improved by a high school 
■in every township, we have all come 
to understand that intellectual pow- 
ers demand careful training and dis- 
cipline, if they are to attain fullness 
and efficacy. 

The toddling infant, snut away 
from sound of human voice, would 
never learn to talk; but kept in con- 
stant company with its seniors, how 
soon that little mind develops until 
It grasps the meaning of words which 
the little lips soon learn to enunciate. 
So On through the school life, and out 
Into the broader school of every day 
business life, the imaginative, mathe- 
matical, musical, histrionic, aesthetic, 
literary and technical faculties of the 
mind are stimulated, drawn out and 
■perfected; or else lay dormant and 
■useless, a pathetic mockery of what 
might have been. 

Remembering and emphasising the 
necessity of intellectual training, we 
are not altogether insensible to the 
fact that conscience and will must al- 
so be developed by careful training. 

The child surrounded by evil in- 
fluences, to whom profanity is com- 
mon parlance, and drunkenness and 
debauchery an every day experience, 
will soon learn to take the name of 
God in vain, and that without the 
least conviction of conscience; and 
do all the evil things to which it has 
been accustomed, without realizing 
that they are wrong. Those who have 
a conscience, that has learned to dis- 
tinguish between right and wrong, 
need constantly to apply God's ethical 
rule that it may he kept strong and 
sensitive. Realizing that there are 
BO many people to-day, who are the 
mere plaything of those with whom 
they associate, both in the business 
and social world, educators and 
leaders of though are seeking as 
Dever before to develop the individu- 
ality; to make the child and young 



man to know that they are one, and 
the responsibility of their life rests 
upon them — so that while the mind 
and conscience is developed, the will 
also may be developed to stand on 
true principles, like a wall of ada- 
ment, to keep them from the wrong. 
But in the midst of all our efforts 
for the development of mind, con- 
science and will, have we not for- 
gotten to putt he heart to school ? 
The strengthening of the effections 
are almost entirely forgotten. The 
impulses of piety, clemency and sac- 
rifice come and go without the least 
effort on our part to make them vivid 
or abiding. It seems * as though 
every plant in the garden is cared 
for except that most beautiful and 
fragrant of all, the rose of human 
love, sympathy and helpfulness. 

How many small hearts there are 
that never know a generous impulse. 
How many cold hearts there are that 
never feel the soft warm life-giving 
touch of real love. How many hard 
hearts there are that never are soft- 
ened (by a feeling of sympathy or ex- 
panded by an impulse of self-sacri- 
fice. It is not selfishness after all 
that it causing the unrest in the 
business world, and the misery and 
sorrow in our social life ? It was 
said of Soloman, that he had large- 
ness of heart even- as the sand on the 
seashore. 

The heart of our Lord was as big 
as the world and broke at its redemp- 
tion. As the love of Christ reached 
to the remotest parts of the world, 
touching every friend and every ene- 
my, moving him to die on the cross, 
that they might not perish, but have 
everlasting life, so should we seek to 
develop the heart until we can truly 
love our enemies and do good to 
them that despitefully use us. 

Remember this, when you and I 
leave this world, no one will rise up 
to call us blessed because of the dol- 
lars we have accumulated; or drop 
a tear over our casket becaue of the 
mean things we have said and done, 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



13 



but we will be remembered kindly 
for the kind words we have spoken 
and the loving deeds we have done. 



Points — Stop and Think. 

Blessed are the cross-bearers. 

"I have learned in whatsover istate 
I am, therewith to be content." 

An ounce of father's example is 
worth a pound of mother's influence, 
especially with boys. 



Strong drink is not only man's way 
to get to the devil; but the devil's way 
to get man. 

"Prayer is the golden chain that 
binds us to the Father's throne; 

It is perhaps the heavenly seal toy 
which he knows his own." 



Bear ye one another's burdens and 
thus fulfil the law of love. If you 
would be happy forget self." 



SHALL A GRANGE INCORPORATE? 




O igain a clear understand- 
ing of the advantages, if 
any, that accrue to the 
Subordinate or Pomona 
Grange through incorpora- 
tion it is necessary to have a com- 
paratively certain idea of the legal 
standing of the Grange both before 
and after incorporation. Within the 
compass of an article such as this 
it is impossible to give a full exposi- 
tion of this standing, as it involves 
many details which to the lawyer are 
essential, but to the layman, not only 
not essential, but practicably inex- 
plicable. 

llhe Grange, Subordinate or Po- 
mona, duly organized and established 
under the authority of a charter from 
the National Grange, is what is term- 
ed an unincorporated association. It 
is a society of individuals, whose pur- 
pose is to do certain things under- 
stood anaong themselves. The asso- 
ciation and its members are guided 
and governed by their own constitu- 
tion and by-laws, which in turn are 
directed by the constitution and by- 
laws of the parent association. It has, 
however, a well-defined legal status 
under the civil laws. 

The act of incorporation would 
change the Grange into that legal 
entity known as a corporation, which 
In the eye of the law is virtually a 
person composed of many individuals, 
but having all the powers and privi- 
leges of a single person in so far as 
those powers and privileges do not 
go beyond pie scope of the charter 
of incorporation. 



Just why a Grange should go to 
the expense and trouble of sc'curing 
a charter of Incorporation may be a 
little difficult to define. Does it gain 
any powers, any privileges, any real 
advantages thereby ? 

The Act of Assembly of 1874, says 
a corporation shall have these pow- 
ers : 

"1. To have succession by its cor- 
porate name for the period limited by 
its charter, and when no period is 
limited thereby, or by this Act, per- 
petually, subject to the power of the 
general assembly, under the constitu- 
tion of this commonwealth. 

II. To maintain and defend ju- 
dicial proceedings. 

III. To make and use a common 
seal and alter the same at pleas- 
ure. 

IV. To hold, purchase and transfer 
such real and personal property as 
the purposes of the corporation may 
require, not exceeding the amount 
limited by its charter or by law. 

V. To appoint and remove such 
subordinate officers and agents as the 
business of the corporation requires, 
and to allow them a suitable compen- 
sation. 

" VI. To make by-laws not inconsist- 
ent with law, for the management of 
its property, the regulation of its af- 
fairs, and the transfer of its stock. 

VII. To enter into any obligation 
necessary to the transaction of Its or- 
dinary affairs." 

For all the purposes of its organiza- 
tion there is not one of these powers 
that is not fully possessed by the un- 



14 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



incorporated Grange. It can continue 
to have existence under its associate 
name so long as It remains true to 
the principles of the organization, un- 
der its constitution and by-laws. It 
ican maintain and defend judicial pro- 
•ceedlngs. It can make and use a seal, 
and hold and transfer real and per- 
sonal property through its trustees. 
It can provide for its own officers 
to transact its business, make by-laws 
aot inconsistent with law and enter 
into obligations for the transaction 
of its affairs. 

It may be stated that the Grange 
g-ains no appreciable powers by incor- 
poration. For all the purposes of its 
existence the charter received from 
*he parent Grange is full and ample. 

The difference between an unincor- 
porated association and a corpora- 
tion resolves itself into a question of 
the personal liability of the members 
thereof for the debts of the organi- 
zation. The broad principle may be 
-stated that the only advantage a cor- 
poration has over an unincorporated 
association is that in a corporation 
the members thereof, or the stock- 
holders, are relieved from person- 
al liability for the debts of the cor- 
poration. 

There are several distinctions be- 
tween corporations, but the only one 
that comes within the scope of this 
discussion is that of corporations for 
profit and those not for profit. The 
Orange, if incorporated, is a corpo- 
ration not for profit, and, as such, 
its members are not personally liable 
tor any debts of the corporation. A 
-creditor, in an action to recover his 
claim, would be confined to the prop- 
-erty of the corporation, and could 
oiot proceed to sell the property of 
the indlividiual members as he could 
if It were a partnership. A partner- 
ship is an association of persons for 
the carrying on of a certain business. 
The debts of the partnership, un- 
less it be a limited partnership, are 
the debts of the individuals, and a 
«rediitor, after exhausting the prop- 
<erty of the partnership, can proceed 
to attach the property of ^y or all 
«f the members thereoJ 

An unincorporEffed association, 
<u.ch as the Grange, hold® an inter- 



mediate place between the partner- 
ship and the corporation. The prop- 
erty of the association is the property 
of all the members, as in a partner- 
ship, and upon the dissolution of the 
association the property must be di- 
vided among the inembers In just 
proportion. But, as in a corporation, 
a member cannot demand an ac- 
counting and take out his share of the 
property at will. His ownership de- 
pends upon his membership in the 
association, and when he severs this 
mem'bership he relinquishes his claim 
to any share in the property, and in 
this respect the association and the 
corporation are alike. 

But with respect to liability for 
debts the association is practically 
identical with the partnership. Among 
themselves they are partners, and one 
member, to whom a debt is owing by 
the association, may impose a liabil- 
ity upon the individual members for 
his claim. And in general persons 
outside the association may do like- 
wise. The legislature in 1876 enacted 
that the members of any lodge or 
assooiation pay^ing periodical or fu- 
'neral benefits, shall not be individual- 
ly liable for the debts of this associa- 
tion, but, as the Grange is not a bene- 
ficial order, this law does not effect 
it. 

It may be stated as a positive rule 
that wherever any Grange contracts 
a debt under the authority of its con- 
stJitution and by-laws, every member 
thereof, as a subscriber and acceptor 
of the constitution and by-laws, is 
personally liable for the debt; and, If 
the association Is unable to pay the 
debt out of its joint property, he can 
be compelled to pay it out of his own 
property. But it seems to have been 
established by the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania that where debts are 
contracted, not under the authority 
of the constitution and by-laws, those 
only are personally liable who agreed 
by vote or otherwise to the pesrfprm- 
ance of the act by which the debt was 
contracted; in such cases the rule of 
agency being applied; that is, the 
mem'bers are liable for whom those 
contracting the debt acted as agent. 
This rule was laid down by the Su- 
preme Court for associations not hav- 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



15 



ing trade or profits as theJr object, in 
a suit against a lodge of Masons, and 
it applies directly to the Grange which 
is of the same class. 

A Subordinate or Pomona Grange, 
whose purposes are those laid down 
for the Patrons of Husbandry as an 
organiziation, gains no powers by in- 
corporation, but the members thereof 
gain the advantages of exemption 
from personal liability for the debts 
of the organization. The value of this 
depends upon the manner in which 
the Grange as run and its estimate 
must be left to the Granges them- 
selves and their members. 

Any Grange that proposes to go be- 
yond the mere purposes of its organi- 
zation, and to do anything of a com- 
mercial or financial nature, such, for 
instance, as a mercantile business, 
places itself in a class where incorpo- 
ration is very much to be desired, If 
not absolutely necessary. Exemption 
from personal liability in suich a case 
becomes of inestimable value, and for 
purposes of this kind the powers of 
a corporation are exactly suited. A 
Grange under ordinary circumstances 
may run along indefinitely and 
never have need of incorporation. 
Indeed, at may be said that it would 
be a rare exception when such a need 
would be felt. But no Grange should 
enter the commercial or financial field 
without incorporation. 

JOHN W. HOKE. 



Licgal Queries. 

This article on the incorporating 
of a Grange is written by Hon. John 
W. Hoke an attorney and a member 
of the Legislature from Franklin 
County. It is thought that perhaps 
our readers might like to have a legal 
department in Penn'a. Grange News 
where inquiries of a legal nature 
might be asked and answered. If so,, 
send them in on a sheet of paper 
separate from anything else and if 
there is enough interest manifested 
in such a department to justify it, this 
department will be continued. Ad- 
dress your queries to 

PENN'A. GRANGE NEWS, 

Chambersburg, Pa. 



T\he following self explanatory an- 
nouncement has been sent to all Pa- 
trons of the firm. This old estab- 
lished Grange House advertise® regu- 
larly in our columns and is in position, 
to give (entire satisfaction on every 
grocery order : 

On and after March 1st, 1906, Mr. 
Isaac N. Wood, Manager, and Mr. 
W. W. Woodward, Bookkeeper, wilS 
be no longer in our employ and will 
have no authority to transact any 
business for us. 

The business will be continuedT 
under new and thoroughly capable 
management, and every efCort will be 
made to give entire satisfaction as to 
prices and quality oif goods as well 
as services rendered. 

Owing to the above changes it will! 
be impossible to issue the Price List 
for March. Your order, however, will 
receive prompt attention and satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. 

Thanking you •cordially for your 
past favors, and earnestly soliciting 
a continuance of same, I remain, 
Resipectfully, 
CATHARINE G. BARNBS. 
Thornton Barnes, The Grange Whole- 
'• sale Grocery House. 



Actual and Suggested Reforms. 

iSurely this is the day and the gen- 
eration of reforms. Perihaps the city 
of Philadelphia and the State ot 
Pennsylvania needed them most any- 
how thus far they have led in secur- 
ing them> It has been a bad year 
there for the grafters. The insurance- 
commissioner, who formerly took in 
$50,000 a year in fees is now paid ai* 
annual salary of $6,000. The Secre- 
tary of State who hitherto had about 
$35,000 every year in fees, hereafto»" 
will work for $8,000. The most re^^ 
markable occurrence, howeixePr iS'tllit 
dropping oif 23 house emiployes fro«» 
the pay roll, on the theory that they 
render no substantial service to the* 
State and do not earn the money. 

These bits of graft are small eacl» 
in themselves, but in the aggregate 
they amount to a good deal. These 
places are given out in payment of 
political work long before the Le^s- 
lature meets and for the promise of 
work to be done after it adjourns.— Es 



16 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



P^nnsijrlltx^nm CSrangje ^<xnxi^^. 



Pegging Away. 

Men seldom mount at a single bound 

'To the ladder's very top; 
They must slowly climb dt, round by 
round, 
With many a start and stop. 
And the winner is sure to be the man 

iWho labors day by day, 
For the world bias found that the 

safest plan 
Is to keep on pegging away. 
You have read, of course, about the 
hare 
And the tortoise — the tale is old — 
How they ran the race — it counts not 
where — 
And the tortoise won we, re told. 
The hare was sure he had time to 
pause, 
And to browse about and play; 
So the tortoise won the race because 
He just kept pegging away. 

— F. H. Sweet. 



What CJonstltutes Success. 

Mrs. A. J. Stanley, oif Lincoln, 
Kansas, was awarded a prize of $250 
by a Boston firm for the best answer 
to the question, "What Constitutes 
Suiocess ?" She wrote : 

"He has achieved success who has 
lived well, laughed often and loved 
much; who has gained the respect 
of intelligent men and the love of 
little children; who has filled his 
niche and aocomiplished his task; whp 
has left the world better than he 
found it, whether by an improved 
poppy, a perfect poem or a rescued 
soul; who has never lacked apprecia- 
tion of eaoh's beauty or failed to ex- 
press It; who has always looked for 
the best in others and given the best 
he had; whose life was an inspiration; 
whose miemory a benediction." 



Partnership. 

There isn't a grander thing on 
earth than a un'ted family. It is one 
of the precious things in this world — 
precious because of its value, its 
beauty and its scarcity. There is 
many a perfect partnership started 
at the wedding altar, which ceases 



to remain such when the family be- 
comes larger. Not that lov.« or har- 
mony ceases, but that in the multipli- 
city of family cares and the increase 
of worldly goods, the same effort to 
please and be pleased, the same mu- 
tual Interest does not go out to the 
children of the home thajt it did to 
the newly wed lovers. If we would 
court our children as we courted our 
wives, if we would try as hard to 
please and win them as we tried to 
win our husbands, there would be 
more united families — perfect part- 
nerships — ^here below. 

I've never known ^ock to break 
away from home through a good 
fence unless some great calamity 
stampeded them. They get out by 
longing for the weeds on the other 
side of the fence, which they reach 
for and loosen the wires. The break 
in the fence is so gradual you see 
the stock wandering from home ere 
you were aware the fence was faulty. 
The children wander from the family 
hearth in much the same way. They 
get attracted by weeds outside and if 
the home life is not congenial and 
pleasant the firsit you realize Is that 
they have wandered away, not in per- 
son, but in aftecTions. A family does 
not have to be scattered abroad to be 
broken. The boys may work side by 
side with father and there be no part- 
nership. The girls may do the same 
with mother. He is a wise father who 
takes his boys into partnership when 
they are mere children and associates 
with them, interests them in his work 
and becomes interested in their play. 

Make the boys partners in the busi- 
ness with a share of the responsi- 
bility and a share of the profits. Make 
the girls more than dish washers and 
cow milkers. Make them bear the 
responsibility of preparing meals, en- 
tertaining company, etc. Never forget 
that skill comes with practice. Never 
severely criticise a child for short- 
comings when he or she has done 
their best. Doing one's best is worthy 
of praise at all times,, no matter how 
poorly the thing is done. Lend en- 
couragement instead of stabbing the 



f 



.1';' 
1^ 



ill'i 



PENINSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



17 



^ 



tender feelings with a rebuke un- 
justly given. A kind word or look 
will tmake a child rejoice all day 
while a thoughtless or senselPss criti- 
cDsin or a frown will rankle in the 
little breast for days. 

iSit down with the boys and plan 
the work for next spring. Ask them 
— no matter how small — what they 
would suggest by way of improve- 
ment. Maybe the Hittle fellow who 
gets the cows will suggest a new gate 
that he can open easier. Perhaps one 
knows where a little improvement 
could me made in the barn. Boys are 
chock full of ideas and they are not 
all bad ones, either. Wisely develop 
and direot them and see the results. 
Too often the boy's idea is scoffed 
at or refused a hearing. He soon 
loses interest in things at home. Why 
not let the boys do some of the 
things you think none but you can do. 
They may spoil a grain stack In 
learning hew to build a good one, but 
what of that ? 

When a perfect partnership exists 
the father and mother can go to the 
fair or take a vacation and know 
that the children will look after the 
things -instead of going hunting or 
playing ball. 

Get better acquainted with the 
children. Tou will be surprised t© 
find them longing for the love which 
you have withheld or failed to show. 
Don't wfait for a funeral to brinj: out 
your love and draw v^m close to- 
gether. Do It now. 

— Successful Farming. 



Boston Rain Signs. 

When the fog goes up and the smoke 

comes down 
And the highest mountain wears a 

crown. 

Look out for rain. 

When the small birds light on the 

telegraph wire 
And the sun comes up in a cloud of 

fire, 

Look out for rain. 

When the swallows tip the highest 

grass, 
And water sweats through pitcher 

and glass. 

Look out for rain. 



When the scythe strikes fire and the 

grass is hard, 
And the cows refuse to leave the yard 
Look out for rain. 

When the stove covers burn with 

beautiful fiame, 
And the kettle boils dry, when no 

one's to blame, 

Look out for rain. 

When the robdn sings his sweetest 

song, 
And the dog eats grass, it won't be 
long : 

Look out for rain. 

— Boston Globe. 



Immortality. 



Ella Wheeler Wilcox in New York 
Amer'ican and Journal. 



Imimortal life is something to be 
earned 

By slow self-conquest, comradeship 
with pain 

And patient seeking after higher 
truths. 

We cannot follow our own wayward 
wills 

And feed our baser appetites and giv« 

Loose reins to foolish tempers year 
on year, 

And then cry "Lord forgive me, I 
believe," — 

And straightway bathe in glory. Men 
must learn 

God's system is too great a thing for 
that. 

The spark d'ivine dwells In each soul, 

And we can fan it to a steady flame 
of light 

Whose luster gilds the pathway to the 
tomb 

And shines on through eternity, or 
else 

Neglect it till it siimmers down to 
death 

And leaves us but the darkness of the 
grave. 

Each conquered fashion feeds the liv- 
ing flame; 

Each well-borne sorrow is a step to- 
ward God. 

Faith cannot rescue and no blood re- 
deem 

The soul that will not reason and re- 
solve. 



18 



PENNSYLVAiNIA GRANGE NEWS 



lif 






N 



I' 
ii'i 



I 



Lean on t'hyiself, yet prop thyself 

with prayer; 
For there are spirits, Messengers of 

Light 
Who come at call and fortify they 

strength. 
Make friends with them and with 

thine inner self. 
Cast out all envy, bitterness and hate. 
And keep the mind's fair tabernacle 

pure. 
Shake hands with Pain; give greeting 

unto Grief — 
Those angels in disguise — and thy 

glad soul 
From height to height, from star to 

shining star 
Shall climb, and claim blest immor- 
tality. 



If the farmers of a community 
would co-operate to the extent of pro- 
ducing the same kind of stock or 
other farm product for the market so 
that shipments could be made in car- 
load lots, it would be one step to- 
ward better profits. 



A Few of the Old Rules. 

There are some rules not taught in 
sahool, 
That every girl s'hould know; 
J>on't fuss and fret, your wrongs for- 
get. 
Each day some kindness show. 

Keep fresh and neat, be kind and 
sweet, 

Don't force your friends to wait 
For church or play because your way 

lis always to be late. 

Be patient when you're ill, and then 

This truth I need not tell — 
Through all the year your friends 
most dear 
Will learn to love you well. 

— Farm Journal. 



The Baiigialn Habit. 

He — ^Well, anyway, wihen I pro- 
posed to you, you snapped me up 
promptly enough. 

She — Yes, I am only a waman, and 
you did look cheap. — ^Topeka State 
Journal. 



Character Building. 

We ar€ building every day 
In a good or evil way, 
And the structure as it grows 
Will our inmost soul disclose. 

Till in every arch or line. 
All our faults and failings shine. 
It may grow a castle grand, 
Or a wreck upon the sand. 

Do you ask what building this. 
That can show both pain and bliss,. 
That can be both d'ark and fair ? 
Lo, it's name is character. 

Build it well, what ere you do; 
Build it straight and strong and true;. 
Build it clean and high and broad; 
Build it for the eye of God. 

— Successful Farming. 



When the railroads withdrew 
passes a bill was introduced in the 
Ohio Legislature making two cent* 
per imile the maximum rate of fare on 
all the railroads in the State. It was 
spoken of as a legislative joke, but it 
was advanced to passage in both 
houses and has now been signed by 
the Governor. For many years such 
a law has been advocated, but until 
they lost their passes the legislator* 
could never be interested. 



Two Tilings at One?. 

The housewife views with failing 
nerve 

Preserving time's proximity. 
She fears she can't at once preserve 

Her fruits and equanimity. 



Prayer for a Ldttle Boy. 

No citizen of any age could be the 
worse for joining in the homely, ten- 
der words which end the simple and 
beautiful prayer for a little boy,. 
written by Boirgess Johnson : 

Make me unselfish with my joys, and' 

generous to other boys; 
And kind and helpful to the old, and 

prompt to d'o what I am told. 
Bl€ss every one I love, and teaoh me 

how to help and comfort each, 
Give m>e the strength right living 

brings, and make me good in 
little things. — A^nien. 



1 



^ 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



19 



I 



^xHutiv^ Committee ge^drimetft 

G. W. OSTER. Editor. 




PRESUME that by this 
time every Grange family 
In the State will have re- 
ceived and read the Feb- 
ruary issue of Grange 
News. 

On page 28 you will have noticed 
that a conference of representative 
Grange workers and others held a 
meeting at Harrisburg March 2, and 
suggested that all candidates for Leg- 
islature shall be interrogated on the 
nine important ques-tions set forth 
therein. I want to add fhat Cory- 
don Grange passed resolutions asking 
the Executive Committee to see to it 
that it is done. 

This work properly lies within the 
province of the Legislative Committee 
to outline the mode of procedure for- 
mulate printed blanks for the pur- 
pose and to distribute same. The 
matter has been referred to the prop- 
committee and t is needless to say 
that that duty will be performed. 

It will then be up to every Subor- 
dinate and Pomona Grange in the 
State to see to it that each and every 
candidate of all parties shall be com- 
pelled — yes, I would say "compelled" 
— to answer all these question one 
way or the other. Will you do It ? 
Tes, I have confidence enough In you 
all that this work will be attended 
to well. 

We can't afford to neglect the op- 
portunity that now awaits us to get 
at least some of the tilings we have 
been long contending for, such as 
trolleys to he given the right to carry 
freight. A uniform two-cent per mile 
passenger rate for all — the poor as 
well as the rich. Licenses etc., re- 
turned to the counties, etc. Patrons 
should see to It and demand that 
these things we ask for shall be Incor- 
porated in the political platforms of 
a,ll parties and in every county of the 
State. I would also like to add a num- 
ber of other things not included In 
these nine subjects. One is the de- 
cnand of the repeal of the obnoxious 
<aw relative to vital statistics and 



burying the dead nine feet deep. 
This, In my opinion, Is one of the 
worst outrages ever forced upon the 
people of this Commonwealth. It Is 
a long step towards establishing In 
this free (?) country an oligarchy or 
aristocracy, because it is conveying 
or delegating powers upon an Indi- 
vidual that are only known or given 
to the Czars of Europe. Then, again, 
the o'bjectionable vaccination law 
compelling all school children to be 
vaccinated should be so amended as 
to give the discretionary power to the 
scfiool boards, to compel vaccination 
when they see danger approaching, or 
if they obstinately refuse to do so, 
upon petition of one-tenth of the 
voters of , any district that they be 
compelled to enforce the order or law, 
when there is approaching danger. 

This, or some similar or better 
plan can be formulated that will 
throw every possible necessary safe- 
guard around the people, and will 
guarantee us the proper enforcement 
of the law. Now, It Is practically a 
dead letter in many districts of the 
State and will always be In its present 
form. 



What About Political Reform ? 

The political situation in Pennsyl- 
vania without any regard whatever to 
party holds more of promise for the 
betterment of conditions in the near 
future than It has for a long period of 
years In this State. The politicians of 
all parties have their ears to the 
ground listening to hear what the 
people want. This is an opportunity 
that should not be missed and In con- 
tending for our principles we need 
men in official position who In them- 
selves are a guarantee of Integrity 
and on whom we can depend. We 
want such a man for Governor and we 
want many of this tiye of men -In the 
Legislature. 

Momentous issues are before the 
people and problems of vast import- 
ance await solution. We want to 
place men in high positions, the life 



20 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



[■'■ 



record of whom stands out proving 
them to be living exponents of worthy 
principles. We want no eleventh hour 
reformers who are now awaiting to 
get in "for revenue only." Men are 
needed who have been tried and not 
found wanting. Fortunately, we have 
such men. All Patrons who attended 
the> last State Grange meeting at Sun- 
bury will remember that after the ad> 
dress of Worthy Master Hill, one of 
the business men of Sunbury who was 
not a member of our Order, but who 
was acting as Chairman of the meet- 
ing got right up and said, that "the 
Grange people of Pennsylvania should 
see to it that Mr. Hill is nominated 
and elected Governor of "this Com- 
monwealth." The intense enthusiasm 
with which this statement was 
greeted showed the popularity of the 
proposition. Since then newspapers 
of the State have taken the matter up 
and so far as known there has not 
been a single unfavorable comment. 
I understand, too, that the Pomona 
Grange of McKean County and also 
the Pomona Grange of Potter Coun- 
ty have passed resolutions urging Bro. 
Hill to allow his name to be used as 
a candidate and pledging to him all 
possible support. 

To my certain knowledge several 
other Counties have assured support 
but so far, Bro. Hill has not inti- 
mated that he was seeking the office. 
While he is living up to Grange doc- 
trine "that the office should seek the 
man and not the man the office," yet 
at the same time the position of Gov- 
ernor of Pennsylvania will not be 
given to one of our members unless 
some active work is done to secure 
It. 

The State Master is not a politician 
and I anticipate that he would rather 
run, if at all, on a Farmers' Plat- 
form such as appeared in Grange 
News or make an anti-corporation 
fight. But the nomination Is the 
thing that must first be secured. He Is 
amply qualified to conduct the affairs 
of this State in the executive chair. 

Another one of our prominent and 
well known members who is also 
known to be true to the best interests 
of the citizenship of this State and 
whose name is being mentioned In 



connection with the State ticket la 
Bro. Creasy. His sterling honesty and 
experience justify the people in plac- 
ing their faith in him also. Penn'a. 
Patrons want him to serve the State 
in some capacity if not as State of- 
ficial then to continue to be a repre- 
sentative In the Legslature. In this po- 
sition he has done much and would 
continue to do more for the farmers 
of Pennsylvania, and at the next ses- 
sion he would actively participate In 
the in-gathering of_ the fruits of his 
earnest efforts in that ibody in past 
years. Patrons should not allow party 
affiliations to Interfere with their giv- 
ing aid to place the best men in Im- 
portant positions, such as these. 



Just a Word About Binder Twine. 

We have closed our contract for 
binder twine for 1906 with the same 
firm we dealt with the last three 
years. The prices are one-fourth 
cent per pound less than last year's 
prices and are considerable less than 
prices named by the Trust. These 
prices and name of firm we deal with 
are strictly confidential and must be 
so regarded for o^bvious reasons. Or- 
der blanks etc., will be sent you In 
April some time, and in the mean- 
time Granges can be working the 
matter up and have your order ready 
to send in early. 



Annonncement. 



Information is at hand that LubIn 
& Company discontinued business 
March 10th, and that the orders al- 
ready sent them would 'be filled by 
another concern. 

State Master Hill at once directed 
Bro. Chandler of the Ex. Oom. to go 
to N. Y. and protect all Grange inter- 
ests and also to procure all Informa- 
tion possible upon the causes for this 
action, and to learn what the future 
outlook was. At the time this matter 
goes to press no further data is avail- 
able. No further orders should be 
sent to this firm, however. 

Next issue will contain as full in- 
formation as we can obtain upon the 
matter. 



.PElSrNSYL.VANIA GRANGE NEWS 



21 



Nuggets from the State Secretary. 



New Granges Organized. 

Since the meeting of the State 
"Grange at iSunbury, Pa., Dec. 12-15, 
1905, fifteen new Granges have been 
■organized as follows : 

No. 1295, Lackawana County, Dec. 
12, 1905, by A. F. Hobbs, with 13 
memibers. Master, C. M. Pall 

man, Chinchville; Lecturer, E. A. 
Myers, Clarks Summiit; Secretary, G. 
®. Griffin, Clarks Summit. 

No. 1296, Erie County, by Thomas 
Hurst, with 77 members, Dec. 29, 

1905. Master, H. P. Shade, Water- 
ford, R. D.; Lecturer, Mrs. D. D. 
Turner, Waterford, R. D. No. 9; Sec- 
retary, Mrs. Julia Myers, Waterford, 
R. D. No. 9. 

No. 12 97, McKean County, Jan. 3, 

1906, by L.W. Howden, with 27 mem- 
ibers. Master, A. Conner, Rixford; 
Lecturer, Mrs. E. E. Shippy, Rixford; 
■Secretary, James M. Fraser, Rixford. 

No. 1298, Chester County, Dec. 27, 

1905, by George R. North, with 21 
mem'bers. Master, Wayne Smedley, 
Linville; Lecturer, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Frye Phipps, Linville; Secretary, Mrs. 
Oarrie Dauman, Linville. 

No. 1299, Delaware County, Jan. 
11, 1906, by William T. Pyle, with 41 
members. Master, Alex. S. Gay, 
Media, R. D. No. 2; Lecturer, Marie 
B. Nelling, Media, R. D. No. 2; Secre- 
tary, Laura D. Pancoa&t, Chester, R. 
D. No. 1. 

No. 1300, Bradford County, Jan. 12, 

1906, by N. D. Snyder and A. M. Cor- 
nell with 51 members. Master, L. W. 
Pratt, LeRaysville; Lecturer, D. A. 
Wood, LeRaysville; Secretary, How- 
ell Powell, LeRaysville. 

No. 1301, Lycoming County, Jan. 

16, 1906, by Frank Porter, with 15 
members. Master, George Robinson, 
Williamspont, R. D. No. 2; Lecturer, 
Im a. Pidcoe, Linden, R. D. No. 3; 
Secretary, Frank Solder, Linden, R. 
(D. No. 3. ^ 

No. 1302, Bradford County, Jan. 

17, 1906, by N. D. Snyder, with 110 
members. Master, I. W. Caswell, 
Rummerfleld; Lecturer, J. A. Biles, 
(Hornets Ferry; Secretary, C. M. Ho- 
cnet, Hornets Ferry. 



No. 1303, Schuylkill County, Feb. 6, 
1906, John Shoener, with 29 memibers. 
Master, Harvey Ferrebee, Pine Grove, 
R. D. No. 3; Lecturer, J^ S. Brown, 
Pine Grove, R. D. No. 3; Secretary, 
C, W. Kerschner, Pine Grove, R. D. 
No. 3. 

No. 1304, Chester County, Feb. 8, 
1906, by Geo. R. North, with 41 
members. Master, John Gyger, Kim- 
berton; Lecturer, Daniel W. Gyger, 
Kim/berton; Secretary, Mrs. J. K. 
Funk, Kimberton. 

No. 1305, Erie County, Feb. 19, 
1906, by Thomas Hurst, with 27 
members. Master, C. C. Kirkland, 
Girard; Lecturer, Mrs. R. W. Blair, 
Girard; Secretary, F. W. Blair, Gi- 
rard, R. D. No. 4. 

No. 1306, Chester County, Feb. 19, 
1906, by George R. North, with 65 
members. Master, J. F. Lantz, Wye- 
brooke; Lecturer, Martha Ranck, 
Honey Brook; Secretary, Aima M. 
Keenan, Weybrook. 

No. 1307, McKean County, F^b. 24, 
x906, by L. W.Howden, with 20 mem- 
bers. Master, G. A. Dick, Kane; 
Lecturer, C. J. W. Asp, Kane; Secre- 
tary, A. T. Larson, Kane. 

No. 1308, Washington County, Feb. 
24, by L. D. Woodfill, with 56 mem- 
bers. Master, J. W. Horton, West 
Brownsville, R.D. No. 1; Lecturer — ; 
Secretary, James L. Dague, West 
Brownsville, R. D. No. 1. 

No. 1309, Bedford ^County, Mar. 1, 
1906, by G. W. Oster, with 28 mem- 
bers. Master, George Z. Replogle, 
Woodbury; Lecturer, H. B. Hoffman, 
Woodbury; Secretary, A. A. Detweiler, 
Woodbury. 



Re^Organlzed. 

The following Granges have been 
re-organized : 

No. 1005, Wayne County, Jan. 4, 
1906, by C. H. Williams, with 13 
members. Master, S. B. Doyle, 
Poyntelle; Secretary, Mrs. S.B. Doyle, 
Poyntelle; Lecturer, W. E. Perham, 
Niagara. 

No. 194, Bradford County, Jan. 17, 
1906, by A. T. Lilley, with 41 mem- 
bers. Master, L. E. Post, Towanda,, 



22 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANIQE NEWS 



R. D. No. 6; Lecturer, ; Sec- 
retary, D. W. Post, Towanda, R. D. 
No. 6. 

No. 1057, Northampton County, 
Feb. 12, 1906, by C. H. Dildine, with 
16 members. Master, Amos F. Acker- 
man, Ackermanville; Lecturer, Jos. 
R. Ackerman, Ackermanville; Secre- 
tary, F. H. Ackerman, Ackermanville. 

No. 139, Columbia County, Feb. 22, 
1906, by C. H. Dildine, with 26 mem- 
bers. Master, Wm. P. Zehner, Main- 
ville; Lecturer, Mrs. B. B. Albertson, 
M'ainville; Secretary, John A.iShuman, 
Mainville. 

No. 146, Columlbia County, Feb. 
24, by C. H. Dildine, with 18 mem- 
bers. Master, A. C. Adams, Berwick, 
R. D. No. 2; Lecturer, R. F. G. 
Kashinka, Berwick, R. D. No. 3; 
Secretary, H. F. Rittenhouse, Ber- 
wick, R. D. No. 3. 



At the last meeting of Pomona 
No. 23, Bradford' and Sullivan Coun- 
ties, the Patrons ipresent were much 
impressed by the paper of Sister 
Loui% Piollet on "The Rights of 
Children." Parents should properly 
"lead tbe faltering steps from the 
threshold of life to the 'portals oif 
eternity. 

''Little feet will go astray. 
Guide them, mothers, while you may." 
• • ■ • 

Our Grange, Tloga Valley, No. 918, 
Tioga County, is in a very prosper- 
ous condition. Have Just had our 
hall re-papered and the wood-work 
re-<painted. Doing initiation work at 
every meeting. Brother Mortimer 
Whitehead will talk to us at a special 
meeting, March 10. 

Our Grange Insurance Company 
now carries risks to the amount of 
$5,300,000. Loses In January, $5.00; 
in February, $40.00. C. D. K. 



"J. W. Darrow, of Chatham. N. n:, 
official press correspondent of the 
New York State Grange, would like 
to receive a copy of the printed pro- 
gram for 1906, from each Subord- 
inate Grange that has one in Penna., 
with a view of making use of some of 
the papers to be read in his news- 
paper work. Will the Lecturer/ kind- 
ly forward the program In question ?" 



We are fully alive to the fact that 
we live in a period of great prosperi- 
ty, in the most wonderful era of the 
world's history. The production of 
wealth is unprecedented. While 
every one should fully appreciate this 
and be thankful for it there are some 
facts that should not be overlooked. 
It must not be forgotten that wealth 
is the product of labor. Wealth can- 
not be created by artificial means. 
It does not come as a windfall from 
the clouds. It is not unfair to claim 
then that the man who works should 
have the first and largest share. That 
he does not have it is only too true. 

The per capita wealth of the United 
States has more than doubled since 
1864. Has the wealth of the average 
working man doubled in the saMe 
time ? However this may be with 
the wage earners, no one will claim 
that it is true of the farmers, cer- 
tainly not of the Pennsylvania farm- 
ers. Who is more deeply Interested 
than they in knowing the why ? In 
part it may be due to natural causes, 
but, in large measure it is due to 
the man-made conditions. If man 
made the conditions, men can change 
them and they will be changed to the 
betterment of the man behind the 
plow only as he makes himself heard 
and felt in the body politic. In other 
words, when farmers learn to stand 
together through organization. 



The present agitation In the coal 
regions and the exhorbitant prlcea 
paid for coal by the consumer again 
raises the question of the right of 
private interests to monopolize the 
bounties of nature. 

Why should one (man or a combina- 
tion of men be allowed to sit down 
on what Godi has made for the whole 
people and call it theirs and allow 
others to have it only at their price ? 
Some day the giant public will assert 
his righits and when he does the mo- 
nopolist will move on. 



Worthy Master : 

Is it necessary to send our By- 
Laws to the National Grange for 
their approval ? Some of our mem- 
bers think that It Is, while others 
think as you have seen them, fha/t 1b 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



2? 



sufficient; so to be on the safe side, 
I write you for information. 

Ooir Orange Is flourishing nicely. 
We han^e initiated twienty-eight in 
the last two (meetings and now have 
nine applications. More have been 
promised. We now have 147 mem- 
bers. We are trying to keep ahead ' 
of another Grange and a-t this rate, 
think, perhaps, we can. 
Fraternally, 
BESSIE TABER, 

Sec'y. Clover Leaf Grange, No. 
1265, Erie County. 

[The State Master's approval Is all 
that Is required.] — ^W. F. Hill. 



A letter just received 'from that vet- 
eran Huntingdon County Patron, Bro. 
H. H. Sommers, states that their late 



Pomona meeting was a grand suc- 
cess. The Town Hall In Marklesbiirg 
was well filled and the large attend- 
ance was pleased with the address of 
Bro. Oster. Bro. J. G. MoHenry was 
there on Wednesday, but being called 
home to attend a funeral, was unable 
to discuss the banking matter except 
in an informal way. The Patrons of 
this county seem to be disposed to 
think they ought to have a bank of 
their own and are taking some steps 
in that direction under the guidance 
of Bro. McHenry who Is the special 
representative of the State Grange on 
banking interests. 

A class of twenty-four received the 
Fifth Degree and Bro. Sommers 
writes that an even half dolen were 
recently admitted to his Subordinate 
Grange. 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS HAS A UCENSE TO GROW BIG. 



Tl W E N T T-FIVE thousand 
I copies is a large circula- 
I tion. "Penn'a. Grange 
News" has this now and 
still we want more. We 
also want it to help every Grange get 
new miemlbers. 

You see, this puTDlicatlon is the of- 
ficial Grange organ and all Interests 
therefore are mutual. No private 
ends are advanced in any way as 
this is a co-operative publication put 
out by the Grange organization In 
Pennsylvania. Each member of every 
Grange is sharing in its maintenance' 
and success. It is d'ependent upon 
the Grange — upon your Grange In 
part. 

So we want to bave It help build 
up your Grange. Of course, present 
members are strengthened In their 
faith by reading it. Biut we want to 
get new members Into your Grange. 
We also want to help you win trolley 
.freight, two-cent railroad fare, in- 
crease of State aid for township 
roads, etc., etc. Lots of reforms 
needed. To gain these good things, 
public sentiment must be created; the 
outside voter must 'be educated. The 
partisan press won't do that. The 
corporation Journals are silent. But 
"Penn'a. Grange News" talks fear- 
lessly, fairly and persistently. We 



want to talk, too, to those outside 
the gates. It will help the cause, 
help your Grange, and help the fam- 
ily receiving it. 

Twenty-five cents a year is cheap 
for the amount and quality of read- 
ing matter this magazine presents. A 
good many copies are no\lt being sent 
to your Grange. Why not vote a few 
dollars from the Treasury — if need 
be — and have the magazine sent a 
year to the addresses of outsiders the 
Grange will select at twenty-fiv.e 
cents each. 

Below is a subscription blank. We 
hope to receive some paid suibscrip- 
tions from your Grange. The Secre- 
tary will send them in If you request 
it. 

Just cut out this page and fill in 
addresses on the other side. 

If you have "Penn'a.Grange News"^ 
sent one year to some outside the 
gates they will not read it very long 
till they will knock to join your 
Grange. The initiation fees and dues 
you will get from them will soon re- 
pay to your treasury several times 
the twenty-five cents you vote out of 
It for his subscription. Along with 
the other good things you can make 
this magazine be a revenue producer 
for your Grange. Act to-day. We'll 
do our part. 



X 








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!■ 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



25 



Topics Suggested by 
Grange. 



the National 



APRIL. 

Why do we favor fhe election of 
United States Senators by popular 
vote ? 

What of the importance and sig- 
nificance of Children's Day ? 

What can be done toward the solu- 
tion of the farm help problem ? 



A Word for Juvenile Granges. 

Worthy Master and Brother : 

Yours of March 1st received and 
read at the following meeting of the 
Juvenile Grange, as was also read 
your communication to their Master. 
They expressed their appreciation of 
your interest in their work by unani- 
mously adopting the resolution : Re- 
solved, That we try to make this a 
"good and successful Grange year." 

We would certainly feel highly 
honored to be visited by our Worthy 
State Master. The children are much 
more enthusiastic in the Grange work 
than the young Subordinates. In 
fact, we find the Juvenile Grange' to 
be so nearly the one feature that 
completes the Grange that we are do- 
ing all that lies in . our power to in- 
duce other Granges to organize one. 
We earnestly thank you for your 
kind expresssion®. 

Mrs. BiERTELLA ATKINS. 

Press correspondent and Matron of 
Fishing Creek Juvenile Grange. 

[We will be glad to hear from you 
often] — ^Ed. 



Sister Atkins enclosed report of 
their last Pomona Meeting (Potter 
County) from wliich the following is 
taken : 

Reports of Granges show active 
interest and increase in membership 
in all of the twenty Subordinate 
Granges. 

The next meeting was appointed 
to be held at North Fork, with Vic- 
toria Grange. The question of form- 
ing a Potter County Fire Insurance 
Company was d'iscussed. Potter has 
one and one-half millions of dollars 
held in the Tioga Co. The question 



was referred to a comimittee of the 
following Brothers : Webster, Ly- 
man, Heinrich, Chapman and Hemp- 
hill. 

A class of forty-six added mater- 
ially to our membership as well as to 
the interest of the meeting. 

The following report of the Com- 
mittee on resolutions was adopted : 

Resolved; 1. That a lecture course 
by State Master W. P. Hill would be 
more beneficial to Potter County than 
a sixth degree session. 

2. That women can make them- 
selves useful as members of the 
school board. 

3. That should Worthy Master 
W. P. Hill be nominated for Governor 
of the iState, he should have the sup- 
port of every voter. 

4. That we request the Pomona 
lecturer to have printed in the Po- 
mon^ Grange column the questions 
that are to be discussed at the Po- 
mona meeting. 

5. That the Fishing Creek Juve- 
nile Grange be recognized by Pomona 
Grange No. 54, as an auxiliary of* 
Fishing Creek Grange No. 1246, and 
that blanks will be sent by our Sec- 
rectary for the quarterly reports of 
that body. 

6. That we think It would be to 
the interest of the Grange and the 
farmers of this county to organize a 
Grange National Bank. 

The following resolutions were 
presented, discussed, accepted and 
adopted : 

Resolved, That we, the visiting 
members of Potter County Grange 
extend our heartiest thanks to Cen- 
tral Grange for their cordial welcome 
good cheer, and bounteous tables,and 
hope they will invite us again soon. 

Resolved, That we recommend 
that the Granges of Potter County, 
petition o-ur representatives and Sen- 
ators in Congress to make an appro- 
priation for the establishment of an 
experimental parcels post system by 
the postmaster general. 

Resolved, That we recommend the 
Granges of Potter County to take 
active measures whenever possible 
against the liquor element and to do 
all in their power to secure a locaJl 
option law. 



26 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Resolved, That we ^re-affirm the 
action of the National and State 
Grange in regard to removing the 
tax frcm alcohol rendered unfit for a 
beverage to be used for manufactur- 
ing purposes. 

Resolved, That we re-afflrm th« 
choice of the State Grange in de- 
manding that nine-tenths instead of 
three-fourths of the personal prop- 
erty taxes be retained in the coun- 
ties and all of the license tax. 

Resolved, That we ask for an 
equalization of taxes, letting the 
monied corporations share with the 
farmers the burdens of taxation. 
DEIiLA BARR, 
GEORGE NICKERSON, 
SISTER CHAPMAN, 

Committee. 



Bro. C. H. Dildine, a member of 
the State Grange Executive Commit- 
tee, has been doing some field work 
this winter and during February 
places two new Granges to his credit, 
one in Northampton County and one 
in Columbia County with eighteen 
-charter members and now purposes 
helping the farmers to organize in 
Snyder County. 



Spleaidld Report from Erie Co. 

I have organized a new Grange at 
Girard with 27 charter members. Put 
in two days in "West MilUcreek and ap- 
pointed an evening ito organize, but 
it was the very worst night we have 
had this' winter and only 14 imen and 
2 women ventured out, and I could 
not blame them. Will have to start 
over again ithere. Am also going after 
one at Fairview. The members at 
Girard are, like those at Belle Valley, 
all new material, and I shall have to 
meet with them two or three times to 
get them started. 

The last time I met with Belle 
Valley Grange they initiated eleven 
and had sixteen applicatiotis. Also 
visiited West Green, and they initiated 
fourteen and received thirty appli- 
cations. 

Have been called twice by the 
Dairy Association on the oleo busi- 
ness and we have driven them all out 
of the county except one and he is a 
nfewcomer from Ohio and we are 



after him. We met our congress- 
man In Erie on Saturday to solicit 
his assistance in enforcing the oleo 
and pure food laws. 

Springfield Grange held an open 
installlation and secured five applica- 
tions that day and even old Conneaut 
is taking a start. 

I have succeeded in getting them to 
rent a hall and they have received 
four applications. Erie County will 
make a good show^ing this year again. 

THOMAS HURST. 



A Voice from Potter Coimty. 

Odin Grange, No. 1254, holds reg- 
ular meetings on the Is't and 4th Sat- 
urdays of each month. 

We have entered upon a season of 
prosperity from a Grange standpoint. 
We are receiving now (mem'bers at 
every meeting. Are holding day ses- 
sions now commencing at 10 o'clock, 
a. m., conferring the 3d and 4th de- 
grees in the forenoon. They have 
lunch and confer the 1st and 2d de- 
grees in the afternoon. We are 
building an addition to our hall to 
double its capacity. As soon as we 
get a member we try to ground them 
in the principles of our order. We 
have to educate the younger members 
that they perform the most of the 
duties of offiicers in an acceptable 
manner, and take whatever part Is 
assigned to them in the literary pro- 
grams without any hesitation. 

We have a Legislative Committee 
and discuss all Grange topics and try 
and keep up-to-date in all that the 
Grange is intended for. Ten of our 
members took the Bfh degree at 
Sweeden Valley Pomona. 

Odin Grange is bound to be second 
to none in progressive spirit. We feel 
like highly coimmending their good 
work. May that new hall be built 
with a room for a Juvenile Grange ? 
The children of to-day will be the 
young folks and the men and women 
in a short time. With a training 
which the Juvenile Grange will fur- 
nish them they will be better Patrons, 
too. Let us hear from you often, 
Brother Hall. 

Ulysses Grange No. 1133, met in 
regular session FeT). 20'th, at 7:30 with 
forty memTjers present. Worthy Lee- 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



27 



turer, Mrs. F. P. Wagner had given 
as a suibj€ct for the Literary program 
"Lincoln," quotations and readings 
selected from his work and life, made 
an interesting session. 

Mrs. G. Im L'add gave a short talk 
on Lincoln and his contemporaries. 

Sister Gertrude Nich'olson had a 
good paper on Lincoln's boyhood. 

Light refreshments were served 
and the Grange closed at 10:45, p. m. 

• « • 

Bro. George R. North, a recently 
commissioned Deputy in Chester 
County, has been showing the kind 
of stufC that he is made of and that 
the Pomona Grange made no mis- 
take when they recommended him 
for the position of Deputy, as within 
the last few weeks he has two new 
Granges to his credit in that County 
and the stakes set for another. 

• • • 

Bro. L. W. Howden, an enthusiastic 
Deputy and Grange worker in Mc- 
Kean County, says : "I must just 
drop you a line to let you know that 
the Order in McKean County has a 
new son, born last Saturday at Kane. 
This new Grange has twenty charter 
members with a future bright as a 
new dollar. I also have one under 
way at Crosby and I shall trust Bro. 
Sawyer, who is my successor in the 
ofH'Ce of Deputy here, to push it thru 
and hope he will be able tO' do so. I 
would like to ask if it would be prop- 
er for me to install Oflflcers hereafter 
as I may be -called on to do so and I 
think an open installation nicely per- 
formed is a great, great help to the 
Order." (The State Master regrets 
to lose from his corps of active Dep- 
uties any efficient and energetic 
Grange worker like Bro. Howden. 
While sorry to lose the old, yet the 
new is gladly w^elcomed and I know 
that Bro. Howden will aid his succes- 
sor in every possible way in extending 
the influence of the Order in Mc- 
Kean County. As a past Deputy you 
have full authority to install Officers 
wherever and wihenever invited to do 
so. State Master.) 

« * • 

The Patrons of Columbia County 
organized the Grange National Bank 
of Patton, that county, on March 30th. 



April 3d, the G^range National Bank 
of Tioga (Tioga County) opens its 
doors for business. There will be a 
big celebration there of the event. 

One of these Grange Banks is in 
Northern Pennsylvania and the other 
is in the central part of the State, 
and they speak volumes for the enter- 
prise and business sagacity of the 
Grange membership in those counties. 



EGGS FOR HATCHING 




From the lycading Standard Breeds 

of Thoroughbred Poultry, at ' 

Farmers Prices, Send for Illustrated circular 
and price list. Geo. "W, Oster, 

OSTERBURG, PA. 

ARTHUR. S. CORE 

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANT 

Also General Agent for 

TENNESSEE PHOSPHATE 

302 Greenwich St. 
Neiv YorR. 

Under Contract with the Pa. State Grange 



Seeds 



of aU 

KINDS 



The Theilman Seed Company carry 
a full line of 



/^■^ 



GARDEN AND 

FIELD SEEDS 

We know we can save you some 

money. 

Send for prices on your wants. 



THE THEILMAN SEED COMPANY 

ERIE, PA. 



28 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Complete List of Business Houses under con- 
tract with the Pennsylvania State Grange. 

r£:visc:d up to FX^BRUARY 20tK. 



In li>ritmg for prices or information, or in ordering goods, always %>riie 
under sea! of Grange or trade card* 



Thornton Barnes, 223 North Water 
St., Philadelphia. Groceries. 

Garitee & Sons, 518 Market St., 
Philadelphia. Men's and boys' cloth- 
ing. 

Derrick Oil Co., Titusville, Pa. All 
kinds of illuminating and lubricating 
oils. 

Geo. W. Oster, Osterburg, Pa. 
Thoroughbred poultry, and eggs for 
hatching. 

Patrons Paint Works,245 Plymouth 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Liquid rubber 
paints. 

The Garver Bros. Co., Strasburg, O. 
Groceries, dry goods, hardware, 
queensware, boots and shoes, drugs, 
harness, pumps, clothing, wall paper, 
carpets, furniture, household goods, 
buggies, wagons, salt, oils, wire, nails, 
etc., etc. We can save you big 
money on your purchases. Send us a 
trial order and be convinced. 

C. H. Dildine, Rohrsburg, Pa. 
Chester White and Poland China hogs 
and pigs. 

Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, N. 
J. Badges, flags, emblems, buttons, 
working tools, etc. 

The Demorest Manufacturing Co., 
Williamsport, Pa. The celebrated 
Columbia sewing machines, best on 
earth. 

W. P. Rupert & Sons, Seneca, N. Y. 
Nursery stock of all kinds. 

M. L. Coulbourne, 348 N. Front St., 
Philadelphia. Will sell all kinds of 
country produce for Patrons. 

The Whitney Noyes Seed Co., 
Buffalo, N. Y. All kinds of grass 
seeds. 

George H. Colvin, Dalton, Pa. Po- 
tatoes grown especially for seed, 14 
varieties, prices right, list fret. 

Patterson «& Evans, No. 52 Vine St., 
Cincinnati, O. Grass seeds of all 
kinds. 

Heman Glass. Rochester, N. Y. All 
kinds of farm and garden seeds. 

The One Price Clothing Co., 11th 
Ave. and 12th St., Altoona, Pa. Ready 
made clothing, hats, caps, underwear, 
etc., etc. 

Lester Shoe Co., No. 1409 Eleventh 
Ave,, Altoona, Pa. General line of 
boots, shoes and rubber goods. 



HARVESTING MACHINERY 
For information relative to bind- 
ers, mowers, hay rakes, etc., at special 
prices to Patrons, write under seal or 
trade card to 

I. FRANK CHANDLER, 

Toughkenamon, Pa. 

CREAM SEPARATORS. 
Centrifugal cream separators can 
be furnished Patrons by a special, pri- 
vate arrangement. For full informa- 
tion and prices, write under seal or 
trade card to GEO. W. OSTER, 

Osterburg, Pa. 

Th6 Theilman Seed Co., 1517 State 
Street, Erie, Pa. Seeds of all kinds, 
onion sets and garden implements. 

G. E. Ayer, New Albany, Pa. Rural 
mail boxes at special low prices to 
Patrons. 

The Stromberg Carlson Telephone 
Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y. Tele- 
phones and telephone supplies and 
material. 

Cooper Commission Co., Minneapo- 
lis., Minn. Grain, flour, mill feed, 
ground feed, oil meal and cereals 
straight or mixed car lots. Write for 
prices. 

Edward F, Dibble, Honeoye Falls, 
N. Y. Seeds and potatoes. 






Knowles Freeman FlshXCo., Boston, 
Mass. Mackerel and other salt Ash. 
We own our own fisheries. Write for 
prices. 



Co., Fishers, 



Charles W. Ford & 
N. Y. Seed potatoes. 

R. H. Thomas. Mechanicsburg, Pa. 
Working tools, Stass mountings, bal- 
lot boxes and seals. 

The Buckeye Co., Lorain Ohio. 
Stock and poultry food, louse' killer, 
stock and worm powder, cow vigor, 
gall cure, etc. 

Buffalo Fertilizer Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Fertilizers and fertilizing materials. 

Arthur S. Core, 167 Chambers St., 
New York City, N. Y. Fertilizers and 
flour. I also buy and sell all kinds 
of farm produce for patrons on com- 
mission direct. Patrons, if you have 
any products to sell it will pay you to 
write me first, and get my prices. 



c 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



29 



H. G. Supplee, Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Fertilizers, veliicles, farm Implements 
and machinery, furniture, stoves and 
binder twine. 

C. J. Balnbrldge 202, W. Water 
St., Syracuse, N. Y. Badges, buttons, 
celluloid goods and a full line of 
Grange supplies of all kinds. 

Black Rock Mills, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Bran, Middlings, mixed feeds, grain, 
glutens, cottonseed meal, linseed 
meal, poultry foods,, etc. 



Theodore Z. Root, Jamestown. N.T. 
Author of the book known as "Th« 
Dark Side of the Beef Trust." ThlB 
work is a blow at the beef trust, and 
should be read by every patron. Can 
be ordered from Secretary of the 
State Grange. Oloth, 55c; paper, 35c, 
by mail, postpaid. 

Silver Spring Quarry Co., Almedla, 
Pa. Agricultural and building lime. 

The Buckeye Co., Loraine, Ohio. 
Stock food, poultry food, louse killer, 
etc. 



FOR INFORMATION OF MEMBERS. 

It Is the duty of the Masters of Subordinate Granges to keep a supply of 
Directories on file in their Granges, <aTid see to It that each family Is furnished 
with a copy for their information and use. Additional copies can be had from 
the State Grange. 

BUSINESS CX)-OPERATION. 

In the Declaration of Purposes unanimously adopted by the National 
Grange, it is declared as one of the principles of the Order that for our busi- 
ness interests "We desire to bring producers and consumers, farmers and man- 
ufacturers into the most direct relations possible." 

To carry out in good faith these principles, the Executive Oommittee, 
under the Instruction of the State Grange, has made business arrangements 
with the following houses for the benefit of the members of the Order thru 
which they can buy single implements or in broken packages, to suit purchas- 
ers, at wholesale prices, without the intervention of agents : 

PATRONIZED TRADE ARRANGEMENTS. / 

Patrons, your Executive Oommlttee have made numerous and valuable 
arrangements for your benefit. These trade arrangements eaai only be main- 
tained by giving them a liberal patronage. 

A number of duplicates of the same line of trade therefore, must receive 
a liberal patronage or the contracts cannot be continued. These houses will 
generally secure special freight arrangements when requested. 

Be free to write them for information; but you have no moral right to 
use this information to beat down the price of local agents and retailers, which 
will tend to injure the Grange trade as much at the retailer, besides Incurring 
unnecessary hostility to the Order. 

IDEAL CO-OPERATION. 

The ideal co-operation is direct trade between producers and consumers, 
farmers and manufacturers. The Grange has ibeen making rapid progress In 
this direction and has established the most satisfactOTy trade system known to 
modern civilization. 

It only remains for Patrons to utilize its advantages, and they will save 
more annually many times than it costs to be a member of the Grange — to aay 
nothing of other educational and social advantages. 

RULES. 

1. It Is the duty of the Subordinate Grange to furnish every member with 
a Trade Card at the time of receiving the A. W., which will be good for the 
currant year. 

2. Individual members desiring Information of prices for supplies will 
enclose their Trade Card with the communication to any of the business 
houses arranged with by the State Grange, whereupon the house will, by re- 
turn mail, quote prices or fill orders at wholesale prices In packages to suit 
the purchasers, returning Trade Card to member with bill. The Grange is not 
liable for goods bought under Trade Card, orders by Individual members, as 
such orders must be accompanied by cash or certificate of money deposited in 
bank. 

3. Subordinate Granges Inquiring for prices or purchasing goods officially 
under the seal of the Grange, signed by the Master and Secretary, thirty days 
credit will be given on bill of purchase. 

4. The trade prices quoted are confidential and for Patrons only. 

5. Grange business houses must ship goods ao ordered, otherwise it Is 
the duty of Patrons to promptly return them at the expense of the house 
shipping. 



so 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 




l^OME People Lose Hope 

in the race of life because their way of do- 
ing things does not bring them the joy 
they used to have. Somehow the results 
don't pan out so well. Conditions have 
been changing. Whether we will it or 
not, this old world seems to be pretty well 
set in its way. When a man stands out 
against it he soon comes to believe that his 
neighbors are in conspiracy to "do" him. 
He falls behind. He gets blue. He is 
sure that everybody has agreed with 
everybody else to unite against him. Things 
cease to prosper. Profits go the wrong 
way, and he gets bluer every week. 

Now, we are not graduate doctors, but we have prescribed for 
thousands of Patrons, and you just ought to see the change in their 
smiles "before and after taking." We are just physician enough to 
minister to your finances and we have found that as we fix up people's 
pocketbooks, in some mysterious manner the blues are driven away, 
hope returns, and the patient begins to feel "chummy" again with the 
rest of the world. 

Our prescription usually works about like this. We sell groceries, you know. Suppose in 
your order there is some article that has been costing you-say eight cents — but in the order of 
your goods from us you get it to your station at a cost ot, say, seven cents. You are one penny 
ahead. Not much, you say. No that's true, but still one cent on eight means 

TWELVE AND A HALF PER CENT. SAVED ' 

Pretty good interest on an investment, isn't it ? Well, now if you would make that 
dollars instead of pennies, and save one dollar on eight you would be a dollar ahead. A 
dollar is more money but the point is the percent, of saving. It is this precent. of saving or 

of profit that has made and is making fortunes to-day. 
Probably it would pay you to pay interest on a little 
money if need be to buy groceries from us, as you 
might still be quite a large percent, to the good on the 
deal. Think it over and then do a little figuring. 
Spring fever and the blues will not trouble you this year 
if your fortify your pocketbook with the tonic which the 
old reliable 

Grange Grocery House 

undertakes to dispense with every order sent out. We will / 
help make your selection easy and your order satisfactory 
if you will mention 'Grange News' and write us to-day. 
Of course we are a contract house with the Pennsylvania 
State Grange and have been for years. 




THORNTON BARNES 



223 North Water St. 



Philadelphia, Pa 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANOB NEWS 



31 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE 

OFFICE OF SECRETARY. 
PRICE IjIST of supplies TO BE HAD OF THE STATE SECRJETTARY 

Manuals — Fourth Degree latest edition, pei; set (13) $2.75 

Manuals — Fourth Degree latest edition, per dozen 2.50 

Manuals Fifth Degree, per set of 9 1.50 

Juvenile Grange Manuals,, set of 9 1.50 

Grange Seals 3.00 

Digest 25 

Constitution and By-Laws 07 

Grange Hall Dedication Ceremony 40 

Song books, "Grange Melodies," board covers, cloth single copies or less 

than half dozen 40 

per dozen 4.00 

per half dozen 2.00 

When purchaser pays freight or express, per dozen 3.50 

Dues Book 60 

Secretary's Record Book 43 

Treasurer's Account Book 40 

Blank Reports, Subordinate Granges to Pomona, per hundred .50 

Roll Book 10 

Application Blanks, per 100 50 

Notice of Arrearage, per 100 30 

Notice of Suspension, per 100 30 

Secretary's Receipts, per 100 30 

Treasurer's Receipts, per 100 30 

Orders on Treasurer, per 100 30 

Trade Cards, per 100 ,50 

Demit Cards, each 01 

Withdrawal Cards, each 01 

Origin and Early History of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, by 

Darrow 25 

In ordering any of the above supplies, the cash must always accompany 
the order. The Secretary is not authorized to open accounts. 

Remittances should be made by Postal Money Orders, Drafts or Reg- 
istered Letter. Orders for supplies must bear the Seal of the Grange for 
which ordered.' By order of the Executive Committee. 

The supplies not on the above list, such as badges, implements, working 
tools, ballot boxes, etc., can be had from the Whitehead & Hoag Co., Newark, 
New Jersey, as they are under contract to sell supplies in their line to Patrons 
and Granges at wholesale prices. J. T. AILMAN, 

Secretary State Grange. 

Last Season Our Grange Business 

more than doubled that of any previous year and we have 

been doing business with the Grange under contract with 

many state organizations for over a quarter century. 

This record speaks for itseH. We are getting and holding 

Grange business by furnishing the Best Seeds at the lowest 

possible prices. Write for free catalog and description of our 

GREAT WHIP PROPOSITION— The plan is simple. We put 
the whips iu your hands and they cost you nothing unless they are sold. 
We can save you better than one third on the price or your whips. 

FIELD AND FODDCR. CORN— Our Genesee Valley Flint Corn is 
remarkable for its very long and small cob. It is a great producer of ears which are easy to 
husk. Golden Drop Flint Corn is a handsome red corn with kernels capped with gold. It is 
one •f the earliest and most productive sorts. 

We are offering the above or any of the following varieties: Longfellow, White Sanford or 
Red Blaze to the Grange for 75 cents a measured bushel of ears or ;$ 1.60 per bushel of shelled 
corn Pedigree Fodder Corn — Ivcaming Pride of the North or St, Charles $2.25 per bushel 
shelled com. 



HEMAN GLASS SEED CO. 



Barnardi, N. Y. 



32 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Would You Take It ? 



If Someone Should Hand You a Rebate on all the 

Feed You Buy for Your Cows, Horses, Hogs, 

Sheep, Steers, Calves, Chickens, 

of lO to 25 cts. per lOO-pound Bag% 

of $2 to $5 per Ton, 

of $20 to $100 per Carload, 

it? 



If you would, we can interest you. 

We are the FIRST JOBBERS to extend to the CONSUMER — the Grange 
or individual farmer — ^^the opportunity of buying feed supplies at FIRST 
HANDS, meaning an IMMENSE YEARLING SAVING to any feeder, if he 
will take advantage of our method. 

We know it appears to you easier to go to your local feed stores and haul 
away a few bags at a time of the feed you need, than it would be to figure 
out what total amount of feed you would need for a short period ahead, and 
order it all at one time. But you DON'T stop to CONSIDER the heavy extra 
COST of the supposed easier way. 

It is EASY to buy of us. We have a contract with tTie Penn'a State 
Grange to supply you with FEED SUPPLIES at lowest CASH WHOLESALE 
PRICES. 

We quote you prices delivered at your nearest freight station. 

We sell in carloads of 17^/4 to 20 tons each. 

We ship one or a dozen kinds of feed in the same car. When more than 
one kind of feed is ordered, there is a slight extra charge of the actual cost 
of handling and shipping the different grades in the same car. 

We draw draft on you through your nearest bank, payable when car ar- 
rives at your freight station. 

You alone can buy of us direct, sending us proper references. 

You can club with your neighbors and buy of us. 

You can buy of us through your Grange Representative. We GUAR- 
ANTEE our feeds STRICTLY PURE. We guarantee our feeds to arrive in 
first class condition. We pay promptly any claims, properly substantiated, 
for overcharge in freight, shortage or damage. 

We want to establish a permanent trade with you. We can't afford to 
ship you anything but strictly first class goods. 

A few of the feeds we handle : Spring and winter \)ran; spring and 
winter midds; flour midds or finish; reddog or lowgrade flour; fancy white 
middlings; niixed feeds (bran and midds) ship stuff; corn meal; distillers 
grains; gluten^ feed; brewers grains, malt sprouts; cotton seed meal; oil meal; 
molasses feeds> hominy meal, calf meal; stock food; poultry feed; chicken 
wheat; oyster shells; alfalfa feeds, ana "BLACKiROCK" Molasses. Also many- 
other feeds and combinations of feeds. 

We are making a special drive, for introductory purposes of a 5 bbl 
shipment of our (about 57 gals to bbl) Famous "BLACKSTRAP Molasses. 
Porto Rico, Strictly Pure. 13c per gallon F. O. B., N. Y. City (barrels in- 
• eluded. There is nothing better to keep your stock and horses in A. 1 con- 
dition. Usual amount fed is one pint to one quart per day per animal. 
Send us your order for a 5 barrel trial lot. The use of "BLACKSTRAP" Mo- 
lasses will lessen your actual feeding cost. 

Address your orders and inquiries for feed to our office 

Room 42, Coal & Iron RTnTITATO Itf V 
Exchange BiuMin g MJKJ££ AlAJ^ 11 • I • 

BI^ACK ROCK MILL* 




m. 



■;-- . / 



•y. 



wm 





..^,. 






il» 



The Grange National Bank 



CAPITAI^, $25>ooo.oo 
SURPLUS, $2,500.00 



Opened its doors for the banldiiff business of the s^neral public on Tues- 
day, April 8d. We respectfully iUTit* the public patrrniage and especially that 
of all Grange Patrons. ThUi la the first Grang^e National Bank in the United 
States and is destined to be the besinnins of better things for the farmers, 
laborers and producers. 

Operated under the National Banking IJaws; oflScered by men of highest 
standing; insured in reliable companies against loss by Are or burglars, the 
institution has been safeguarded in every possible way, thus making it a Na- 
tional Bank worthy of your confldenee and support. 

We want your banking businees, whether it is large or small; whether yon 
llTe within two miles or two hundred miles the rural free dellTCry brings 
us to your door. Uncle Sam will call for your letter containing a deposit, and 
will bring it safely to our counter, which is always under liis supervision. 

The eyes of the banking world are centered ujpon this Institution. Ths 
4[uestions wre being asked: will it be a success; will the farmers stick together? 
Let us answer that quesdoQ in tiire way we should. .Support this moveoMat 
with a share of your business. Send a deposit by mail to-day, if it isn't more 
than one dollar — ^Jnst to ^ow your good will. 



3 Per Cent. Interest Will Be Paid On Time Deposits. 






'M 



'■'il 



OWFICEIRM. 

S. P. HAKES, President. E. B. DORSETT, Cashier. 

W. F. HILL, Vl««-President. F. L. NEARING, Asst. Cashier. 

JOHN G. McHKNRT. Vice-President. 



H. Q. SMITH 
JULIUS TRBMAIN 
FRANK O. STEELS 
SIM. HUGHES 



DIRECTORS. 

S. P. HAKES 
W. A. HUGHE« 
G. E. SAXTON 

P. L. NBARIN® 



W. F. HILL 
B. B. DORSBTT 
JOHN G. McHKNRT . 
PHILO TULLER 



«^ 



iJ'if^-* 



^•S*C 



. r- 



Missing 



Vol. 




9 



no 




1906 



y: 





GET THE HIGHEST PRICES 

When you have 

Crops to Sell 

There is a way. 

We Tell You How 

In Our Advertisement which appears 

ON THE INSIDE BACK COVER OF 

THIS PAPER. 



READ IT NOW 



The Pennsylvania Telephone Co. 

HARRISBURG, PA. 





TuhlislTcd hv t\]t Vmmvlvicxnm ^tate (grange 



VOL. II. No. 10 



MAY, J906. 



25 Cknts per Year 
5 Cp:nts per Copt 



G. \V. OSTKR, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. 



Editor. 

\V^ T. CKKASY. 

Editor Legislative Committee Departmea t 



Official publication. Is.sued monthly. Entered January 13, 1906, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress ol March 3, 1879, 



PUT NONE BUT AMERICANS ON GUARD." 



A1 T EVERY SESSION of the State Legislature or of Congress sanguine 
people feel hopeful of getting some reform legislation enacted into 
law. After the smoke clears away and the courts get through 
putting their interpretation upon the laws that have been passed, 
in too many instances the people awaken to realize that gold 
bricks have been handed out to them again. Just now one would think to 
listen to the declarations of the would-be office-holder that you might shut 
your eyes and vote blindly because everybody is making loud professions of 
love for the dear people. The woods everywhere are full of reformers, but 
if you will look at the other side of the coat that many of these fellows are 
wearing, you will find that they merely have a different side out and the 
coat is so made that it can be turned again as soon as they get back Into 
power. To place confidence in such eleventh hour reformers is a risky busi- 
ness. It is just about as bad as sending lawyers all of the time to the State 
Senate or Congress and so place them in position where they can draw a 
double fee, the one being the fee from the corpor'ation and the other, the fee 
from the State as a Legislator. It is a notorious fact that practically every 
lawyer who has been sent to the Pennsylvania State Senate in the last ten 
years has drawn a fee from corporations during his term in office. 

When a Legislator takes a retaining fee from a corporation, the expfc- 
tation is that he will not allow other interests to be hurt by the passage of 
any legislation that would operate to their disadvantage. We have seen this 
thing working out in actual practice in Pennsylvania year after year and year 
after year. The writer of this article is at a loss to understand why the great 
mass of voters of this State should continue to select lawyers as their repre- 
sentatives in official positions. The farmers and business men of this State 
should awaken to a realization of the importance of their interests and real- 
izing their numerical power and influence should select from among their 
own class, men who have a knowledge of their needs, who are in sympathy 
with their work in life and who have the courage and moral stamina to stand 
honestly and fearlessly in support of their convictions. In such a field the 
Grange inay be a power. Strong and worthy men are to be found with po- 
litical affiliations which identify them with the istrong parties of this State. 
Party linds are distasteful in local and municipal affairs to many men posses- 
sed of these strong convictions. While it might require the clear call of a 
people united on broader principles than party lines .to induce such men to 
become public servants, yet the needs of the times and the honest sentiment 
of the masses, could it but find expression, unite in calling such men forward. 
Through them the principles of our Order and of rig;ht ideals may be worked 
out in the interest of better government. 




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■C'-'c'V^jf'' 






VOL. II. No. JO 



MAY, J906. 



25 Cents per Year 
5 Cents per Copt 



Editor. 
G. W. OSTER, W. T. GREASY, 

Editor Executive Committee Department. Editor I^egislative Committee Departmen t 




Official publication. Issued monthly. Entered January 13, 1906, at Chambersburg, Pa., 
as second class matter, under Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 

" PUT NONE BUT AMERICANS ON GUARD." 

T EVERY SESSION of the State Legislature or of Congress sanguine 
people feel hopeful of getting some reform legislation enacted Into 
law. After the smoke clears away and the courts get through 
putting their interpretation upon the laws that have been passed, 
in too many instances the people awaken to realize that gold 
bricks have been handed out to them again. Just now one would think to 
listen to the declarations of the wouldrbe office-holder that you miglit shut 
your eyes and vote blindly because everybody is making loud professions of 
love for the dear people. The woods everywhere are full of reformers, but 
If you will look at the other side of the coat that many of these fellowa are 
wearing, you will find that they merely have a different side out and the 
coat is So made that it can be turned again as soon as they get back ijnito 
power. To place confidence in such eleventh hour reformers is a risky busi- 
ness. It is just about as bad as sending lawyerp all of the time to the State 
Senate or Congress and so place them in position where they can draw a 
double fee, the one being the fee from the corporation and tTie other, the fee 
from the State as a Legislator. It is a notorious fact that practically every 
lawyer who has been sent to the Pennsylvania State Senate in the last ten 
years has drawn a fee from corporations during his term in office. 

When a Legislator takes a retaining fee from a corporation, the expfc- 
tation is that he will not allow other interests to be hurt by the passage of 
any legislation that would operate to their disadvantage. We have seen this 
thing working out in actual practice in Pennsylvania year after year and year 
after year. The writer of this article is at a loss to understand why the great 
mass of voters of this State should continue to select lawyers as their repre- 
sentatives in official positions. The farmers and business men of this State 
should awaken to a realization of the importance of their interests and real- 
izing their numerical power and influence should select from among their 
own class, men who have a knowledge of their needs, who are in sympathy 
with their work in life and Who have the courage and moral stamina to stand 
honestly and fearlessly In support of their convictions. In such a field the 
Grange may be a power. Strong and worthy men are to be found with po- 
litical affiliations which identify them with the strong parties of this State. 
Party lines are distasteful In local and municipal a^airs to many men posses- 
sed of these strong convictions. While it might require the clear call of a 
people united on broader principles than party lines ,to induce sucli men to 
become public servants, yet the needs of the times and tlie honest se^ntiment 
of the masses, could It but find expression, unite in calling such men forward. 
Through them the principles of our Order and of right Ideals may be worked 
out in the Interest of better government. 



2 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Interrogating Candidates. 

To Masters and Legislative Com- 
mittees : 
On another page of this issue will 
be found the interrogatories which 
the State Grange Legislative Com- 
mittee have prepared for submission 
to candidates for the Legislature. 
These apply to candidates for the 
House which are to be elected in ev- 
ery county. And in such counties as 
elect a Senator they will apply to the 
senatorial candidates also. Of course 
they apply to candidates of all parties 
and it is essential that they be sub- 
mitted impartially and fairly to all 
candidates without any distinction 
whatever. 

Counties having a large number of 
Subordinate Granges would do well, 
we suggest, to have the interrogating 
conducted through the Pomona 
Grange Legislative Committee. We 
suggest, therefore, that Subordinate 
Granges get in touch with the Po- 
mona Master and ask him to system- 
ize the work and handle it through 
the Pomona Grange Legislative Com- 
mittee. Penn'a. Grange News will 
send to every Pomona Grange Master 
whatever number of interrogation 
blanks he thinks would be needed 
for his county upon receipt of request 
from him to this effect as we will 
print separate and additional copies 
of this blank. When the Pomona 
has finished its work of sending these 
by mail to each candidate and has 
allowed a reasonable length of time 
for the receipt of the replies, say two 
weeks after they have been mailed 
out, then all answers received should 
be collected and mailed to this office. 
They will be published in the next 
issue of Grange News. Copies will 
be sent to each Grange in every 
county and many copies rharked and 
mailed to several newspapers in each 
county so that the public may be 
fully advised as to what may be de- 
pended upon from any candidate, 
should he be elected. Failure to re- 
ply within a reasonable time or an 
evasive answer can fairly be con- 
strued as meaning that such candi- 
date is against our measures. 

In instances where Subordinate 
Granges are not under the jurisdiction 



of a Pomona, the Master and Leg- 
islative Committees of such Subor- 
dinate Granges should themselves 
submit the interrogatories, handling 
them as arbove suggested and sending 
replies to Penn'a. Grange News, 

Please do not make several batches 
of those replies, but wait until all 
should be in your hands, then send 
all together to this office and indicate 
the county, giving your name and ad- 
dress plainly. The names and ad- 
dresses of Patrons sending in these 
replies will not appear in our pub- 
lication as we will simply give the 
name and address of the candidate 
with his written reply to each ques- 
tion, without any comment on our 
part. 



In another department appears an 
article taken from the "Grocery 
World," issue of May 14th. It may 
perhaps be considered as expressing 
the wish in addition to the prophecy 
that artificial coloring matter in but- 
ter will become an issue. "Penn'a. 
Grange News" is of the opinion that 
the use of harmless vegetable color- 
ing matter in butter will never be 
denied to the dairymen of Pennsyl- 
vania. It never should be. The 
use of coal tar dyes is not justifiable 
and any dairyman uging them im- 
perils both the permanency of the 
practice of continuing to color but- 
ters and at the same time renders 
himself liable to trouble. Already 
some complaints have been made be- 
cause the Dairy and Food Commis- 
sioner of this State has not taken ac- 
tion to stop the use of coloring matter 
in butter when that coloring matter 
is of itself in larger quantities known 
to be injurious to health. This Is 
delicate ground for him to enter 
upon and he has certainly acted the 
part of wisdom in keeping clear from 
entanglements along this line. We > 
print the article without further com- 
ment. 



Next time you write tell us what 
department of Penn'a. Grange News 
you like best and why. We want 
to see whether your preference and 
that of the others agree. If so then 
maybe we could make the whole mag- 
azine into that department. 



PEN'NSTXiVANIA ORANGE NEWS 



The Attitude of the State Master 

as Set Forth in an Open Letter 



Worthy Master and Patrons : — 

I am in receipt of a large num- 
ber of resolutions from Subordinate 
and Pomona Granges in all parts of 
the State endorsing me for the po- 
sition of Governor and urging that I 
become a candidate for the nomina- 
tion. 

Many personal letters of like im- 
port have come to me from every 
county, I taice this means to advise 
all members of my position as I am 
unable to i^ake personal reply to 
each. 

The Grange organization in this 
State is to-day without a peer in its 
work and influence for better citizen- 
ship and purer government. In 
closest possible touch with the in- 
dividual homes of our State — the 
tower of greatest strength that this 
or any other State can possess — it is 
a recognized force in economic 
thought, in the development of so- 
ciety, and in the promulgation of 
patriotic principles. This great or- 
ganization is increasing in power 
every year and leadership in it has 
become possessed of larger obliga- 
tions and responsibilities, and it has 
reached that point in its growth and 
development where every official 
honored and trusted with leadership 
must make the welfare of the Order 
paramount to any personal ambition 
to which as a private citizen he might 
otherwise aspire. 

This is a nonpartisan organization 
and we cannot afford to participate 
in politics to the extent of creating 
possible discord in our own ranks. 

Farmers cannot hope for improved 
legislation affecting agricultural in- 
terests unless they let their attitude 
on important issues be known and 
make their power felt through organi- 
zation. The attitude of the Grange 
is one of open and public record and 
seeks only even handed justice. 
Keeping free from partisan taint our 
comtentions have ever rested upon 



good and worthy principles and never 
in a single instance has the State 
Grange presumed to dictate to any 
member what his party convictions 
should be. 

This condition I desire most earn- 
estly to see continued and while I 
have the honor to serve you as State 
Master, I feel that I have no person- 
al right to aspire to any political 
office. 

In order that there may be a per- 
fect understanding between us and to 
relieve your minds from all anxiety, 
let me say that even though the nom- 
ination for Governor should be 
tendered me by either of the great 
political parties and upon a plat- 
form embracing all that we have 
been working for for so many years, I 
would not entertain its acceptance 
until the matter had been submitted 
to the Subordinate Granges and your 
full and free approval given thereto 
in the belief that its acceptance would 
result in "The greatest good to the 
greatest number." 

The vast importance of the issues 
in the coming campaign as well as 
the traditions of our Order •jnite to 
urge every Patron to ignore party 
prejudice and to courageously use hia 
influence and ballot as conscience and 
judgment may dictate. 

Appreciating highly your continued 
confidence, I thank you cordially for 
the great honor implied in this re- 
quest, 

Fraternally, 




Master Pa. State Grange, 



PENNSYLrVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



CONSTITUTION of the PENNSYLVANIA STATE GRANGE 



Patrons of Husbandry. 



ARTICLE I. — TITLE. 

This Grange shall be known and 
distinguished as the Pennsylvania 
State Grange of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry. 

ARTICLE II. — MEMBERS. 

Sec. 1. The members of the State 
Grange shall be composed of Masters 
of Subordinate Granges and their 
wives who are Matrons; (but when 
from sickness or other sufficient caus6, 
the Master cannot attend, tbe Grange 
may elect a substitute, who can be a 
Past Master, who, with his wife, if a 
Matron, shall be voting members). 
Past Masters and their wives, who are 
Matrons, shall be honorary members 
and eligible to hold office, but not en- 
titled to vote except when acting as 
substitutes. 

Sec. 2. When the Master of a Sub- 
ordinate Grange is unable to attend 
a meeting of the State Grange tbe 
Subordinate Grange shall have the 
right to elect a Fourth Degree mem- 
ber in good standing as its represen- 
tative in the State Grange. 

Sec. 3. The wives of the delegates 
elected to the State Grange, as pro- 
vided for in the preceding section, if 
Matrons, shall be voting members of 
that body. 

Sec. 4. Any person engaged in ag- 
ricultural pursuits and having no in- 
terest in conflict with our purpose, of 
tbe age of fourteen years, duly pro- 
posed, elected and complying with the 
rules and regulations of the Order, 
may be received' as a member of a 
Subordinate Grange. Petitions for 
membership must always be accom- 
panied by the requisite fee. If the 
candidate is not received, the money 
will be returned. Applicants must 
come recommended by at least two 
members, in good standing, be re- 
ferred to a committee aprpointed for 
that purpose, favorably reported, and 
balloted for at a meeting subsequent 
to the one at which the candidate was 
proposed. It shall require three nega- 
tive votes to reject an applicant. 

Sec, 5. The minimum fee for con- 
ferring four degrees on males in this 
Grange shall be three dollars, for fe- 
males one dollar, providing, that the 
minimum fee for minors or males 
shall be one dollar and for females 
fifty c^nts. The money In all cases to 
accompany the application. 

ARTICLE III. — OFFICES. 

Sec. 1. The officers of a Grange, 
whether State or Subordinate, shall 
consist of and rank as follows: Master, 



Overseer, Lecturer, Steward, Assist- 
ant Steward, Chaplain, Treasurer,. 
Secretary, Gate Keeper, Ceres, Flora,. 
Pomona and Lady Assistant Steward. 
It shall be their duty to see that the 
laws and rules of the Order are faith- 
fully executed. 

Sec. 2. The Subordinate Granges 
shall elect their officers annually, at 
the last regular meeting in each year. 

Sec. 3. Officers of the State Grange 
shall be chosen at the regular annual 
meeting every second year. 

Sec. 4. Vacancies occasioned by 
death, resignation or otherwise, in the 
State Grange or Subordinate Granges, 
shall be filled at a special election at 
the next regular meeting. Officers so 
chosen shall fill the unexpired term 
of their immediate predecessors and 
be at once installed. 

ARTICLE IV. — ELECTIONS. 
All elections authorized by the Con- 
stitution of the State Grange or by the 
By-Laws of Subordinate Granges, 
shall be by ballot, and a majority of 
all the votes polled shall be necessary 
to constitute a choice. 

ARTICLE v.— INSTALLATION. 

The officers of the State Grange 
may be installed at the same meeting 
at which they are elected, and officers 
of Subordinate Granges at their first 
regular meeting, subsequent to their 
election, in the next succeeding year. 

ARTICLE VI. — MEETINGS. 

Sec. 1. The State Grange shall hold 
regular annual meetings on the sec- 
ond Tuesday in December, at such 
place as the Grange may from time 
to time determine. Special meetings 
may be called by the Master and 
Secretary, by giving written notice to 
each Subordinate Grange, thirty days 
preceding, or by a vote of the Grange 
at a regular meeting. 

Sec. 2. Forty of the Subordinate 
Granges of the State being represent- 
ed shall constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business at any meeting, 
but a less number may adjourn from 
day to day. 

Sec. 3. Subordinate Granges shall 
have a regular meeting at least once 
each month, but may hold adjourned 
and special meetings whenever the 
good of the Order requires it. 

ARTICLE VII. — ^DUTIES OF OFFI- 
CERS. 

Sec. 1. It shall be the duty of the 
Master to preside at aU meetings of 
the State Grange, to preserve order 
and enforce rules; to see that all the 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



officers and members perform their 
respective duties; to ta'ke care that 
the National and State Constitutions 
of the Order, and the usages of the 
same are observed and obeyed; to pre- 
side over the deliberations of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, and in conjunction 
with the Secretary, call special meet- 
ings of the Grange, when the good of 
the Order requires it. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the 
Overseer to assist the Master in pre- 
serving order, and shall preside over 
the Grange in the absence of the Mas- 
ter, In case of a vacancy of the of- 
fice of Master, he shall fill the same 
until the next annual i?ieeting. 

Sec. 3. The duties of the Lecturer 
shall be such as usually devolve upon 
that officer, or may be imposed by the 
Master or a vote of the Grange. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the 
Steward to have charge of the Inner 
Gate. 

Sec. 5. The Assistant Steward 
shall assist the Steward in the per- 
formance of his duties. 

Sec. 6. The Secretary of the State 
Grange shall keep an accurate record 
of the proceedings of the Granges; 
make out all necessary returns to the 
National Grange; keep the accounts 
of the Subordinate Granges with the 
State Grange and pay over to the 
Treasurer at the end of thirty days 
all moneys coming into his hands, and 
take a receipt for the same. He shall 
also keep a complete register of the 
number and name of all the Subor- 
dinate Granges, , and the names and 
addresses of the 'Master and Secre- 
tary; also at the end of each fiscal 
year send to the Secretary of each 
Subordinate Grange a tabulated 
statement of the quarterly returns 
and dues of the Subordinate Grange, 
notifying the Subordinate Grange that 
if it is in arrears for more than two 
quarters it shall not be entitled to 
representation in the State Grange. 
The Secretary of each Subordinate 
Grange shall report quarterly and 
pay to the Secretary of the State 
Grange the sum of one dollar for each 
man and fifty cents for each woman 
initiated during that quarter; fifty 
cents for each male minor, and twen- 
ty-five for each female minor; also a 
quarterly dues of seven cents for each 
member; and the Secretary of the 
State Grange shall send a receipt for 
the same to the Secretary of the Sub- 
ordinate Grange. The Secretary of 
each Subordinate Grange shall also 
pay to the Treasurer, at the expira- 
tion of each meeting, all moneys com- 
ing into his hands, taking his receipt 
for the same. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the 
Treasurer of the State Grange to re- 
ceive all moneys from the Secretary 
of the State Grange, giving his re- 
ceipt for the same; to keep an ac- 
curate account thereof, and pay them 



out on the order of the Master of the 
State Grange, countersigned by the 
Secretary, with the consent of the 
Grange or Executive Committee. He 
shall render a full account of his 
office at each annual meeting, and de- 
liver to his successor in office all 
moneys, books and papers pertaining:, 
to his office; and he shall give bonds- 
in a sufficient amount to secure the 
moneys that may be placed in his . 
hands — said bonds to be approved by 
the Executive Committee. 

Sec. 8. It shall be the duty of the • 
Gate Keeper to see that the gates are;- 
properly guarded. 

ARTICLE VIII. — COMMITTEES^ ? 

Sec. 1. All committees of the State 
Grange, unless otherwise ordered.shall 
consist of three members and shall be 
appointed as follows: Two members 
by the Master and one by the Over- 
seer. 

Sec. 2. The Finance Committee 
shall consist of three members, whose 
duty it shall be to audit all acdounts 
previous to their being paid, and to 
them shall be referred the reports of 
the Secretary and Treasurer for ex- 
amination and approval. 

At each regular annual meeting of 
the State Grange there shall be elected 
one member of the Finance Commit- 
tee, who shall serve for a term of three 
years. 

Sec. 3, The Executive Committee 
shall consist of the Master, who shall 
be chairman, and three members 
elected by ballot, who shall hold their 
office for three years, one being elect- 
ed each year. They shall have au- 
thority to act on all matters of in- 
terest to the Order, when State Grange 
is not in session; shall provide for the 
welfare of the Order in business mat- 
ters, and shall report their acts, in de- 
tail, to the State Grange at each an- 
nual meeting. 

ARTICLE IX. — ANNUAL AND FIS- 
CAL YEARS. 

The annual year of this and Subor- 
dinate Granges shall commence on 
the first dav of January and end on 
the last day of December in each 
year, and the fiscal year islhall com- 
mence on the first day of October and 
close on the last day of September. 

ARTICLE X. — ^DUBS. 

Sec. 1. The minimum of regular 
monthly dues shall be ten cents for 
each member but each Grange may 
otherwise regulate its own dues. 

Sec. 2. The Secretary of the ^tate 
Grange shall see that the quarterly 
dues of Subordinate Oranges are 
promptly paid, and in case the dueo 
remain delinquent two quarters the 
delinquent Grange shall be reported 
to the Master of the State Grange. 



« 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



On receiving such notice it shall he 
the duty of the Master to warn the 
delinquent Grange, that if the dues 
are not forwarded in thirty days it 
shall be the duty of the Master to ad- 
vise the Master of the National 
Grange of each delinquency and rec- 
ommend the revocal of the charter 
of the delinquent Grange, but any 
Grang whose charter has thus been 
revoked may petition Ithe State Grange 
for reinstatement upon payment of 
dues. 

ARTICIiE XI. — DEMIT AND WITH- 
DRAWAL CARD. 

Sec. 1. Any brother or sister who 
is in good standing and clear of the 
books of the Grange shall be entitled 
to a demit card upon the payment of 
the sum of twenty-five cents. Persons 
bearing such cards may be admitted 
to membership in another Subordinate 
Grange, at a fee not to exceed $1.00, 
but shall be subject to the same forms 
of petition, investigation, and ballot 
as those first applying for member- 
•ship, except that a majority vote shall 
«lect them. A demit shall remain in 
force for the term of six months. 

Sec. 2. A brother and sister in 
good standing desiring to sever his or 
Tier connection wholly from the Order 
-shall be entitled to a withdrawal card 
upon payment of the sum of twenty- 
five cents. A person who has with- 
drawn has severed ail connection with 
the Order; and therefore, is simply 
-bound by those moral obligations 
which are unchangeable. 

ARTICLE XII.— APPLICATION. 

Application for membership in the 
Order shall be by petition to the Sub- 
ordinate Grange of the township In 
which the applicant shall at the time 
reside, if there be one organized and 
working therein; but if not, then 
to the Grange nearest to the residence 
of the petitioner. But for sufficient 
reasons, any Grange may admit an 
applicant as a member, being respon- 
4Bible to the State Grange for the abuse 
of this privilege. 

ARTICL|] XIII. — BOOKS AND RB- 
PORTS. 

The bookstand accounts of the Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, as well as all 
reports of committees, shall be open 
at all times for the Inspection of the 
Masters and Past Masters of Subordi- 
nate Granges who may desire to see 
ithem. 

ARTICLE XIV.— DEPUTIES. 

Sec. 1. There shall be appointed by 
the Master of the State Grange at 
least one Deputy in each county where 
a proper person can be found, whose 
duty it shall be to organize new 
•Granges, an application having been 
imade to him by those desiring such 
an organization; to install officers of 



Granges when the same have been 
elected, and shall be vigilant that no 
disorder shall obtain in ' the Granges 
under his jurisdiction and shall 
promptly report any such disorder to 
the Master. Deputies shall receive 
for organizing new Granges six cents 
per mile for each mile actually trav- 
eled, and five dollars for each Grange 
organized; said amounts to be paid 
from the charter fees paid in by the 
members of the new Grange. The 
Deputies shall be appointed for one 
year, but shall be subject to removal, 
for cause, by the Master. No other 
Granges shall hereafter be recognized 
except those organized *by Deputies 
appointed as herein specified, except- 
ing only those organized by the Master 
or other State Grange officers. 

See. 2. No new Grange shall be 
organized within the limits of four 
miles of one already instituted, unless 
by consent of the nearest Grange; 
provided, that each township shall be 
entitled to have at least one Grange. 

ARTICLE XV — COUNTY GRANGES. 

Sec. 1. It shall be lawful for Sub- 
ordinate Granges to form themselves 
Into associations to be called District 
or County Granges, for the purpose 
of facilitating the transaction of busi- 
ness, of buying, selling and shipping, 
and for such purposes as may seem 
for the good of the Order. County 
Granges shall also have charge of the 
educational interests of the Order. 
Charter for District or County 
Granges shall issue from this State 
Grange and applications therefor shall 
in all cases ibe accompanied by a fee 
of ten dollars. 

Sec. 2. Two or more Subordinate 
Granges located in a county or dis- 
trict in which no Pomona Grange has 
been established may make applica- 
tion to the Master of the State 
Grange for a charter for a Pomona 
Grange, such application shall be 
signed by the persons applying for 
the same, and be accompanied by a 
fee of ten dollars. The number shall 
not be less than nine men and four 
women, who shall be Masters and 
Past Masters and their wives who are 
Matrons, and such Fourth Degree 
members of Subordinate Granges as 
may be recommended by their re- 
spective Subordinate Granges in the 
district or county in which the Po- 
mona Grange is to be organized, but 
no county shall be allowed more than 
one County Grange. 

Sec. 3. The membership of a Coun- 
ty Or District Grange shall be com- 
posed of Masters and Past Masters 
of Subordinate Granges and their 
wives or husbands who are Fourth 
Degree members and such Fourth 
Degree members as may be recom- 
mended by the Subordinate Granges 
as qualified and worthy candidates 






PENINSYLVANIA aRANGE NEWS 



for membership in the District or 
County Grange and elected thereto by 
the District or County Grange, under 
such regulations as may be estab- 
lished by the State Grange or the Ex- 
ecutive Committee thereof, not in con- 
flict with the Constitution of the Na- 
tional Grange. All members in good 
standing in a Pomona Grange who 
have taken the degree of Pomona 
shall be entitled to vote and hold of- 
fice therein. 

Sec. 4. The minimum fee for mem- 
bership in a Pomona Grange shall be 
one dollar each for men and fifty 
cents each for women, and the mini- 
mum quarterly dues shall be ten cents 
for each member. Each Pomona 
Grange may in all other respects reg- 
ulate its own fees and dues. 



Sec. 5. They may elect a business 
agent to act in concert with the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, and it shall be 
their duty to inform the Master of thm 
State Grange of any irregularities* 
practiced by Deputies within their* 
jurisdiction. 

District or County Granges shallJ 
have power to frame by-laws for their 
own government, provided they do not. 
conflict with the Constitution of the- 
National or State Granges, and sub- 
ject to approval by the Secretary of 
the State Grange. 

ARTICLE XVI. 

This Constitution may be amended^ 
or revised at any regular meeting ot 
the Grange by a vote of two-thirds off 
the members present. 



BY-LAWS FOR SUBORDINATE GRANGES 

May be Adopted or Amended. 



ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. This Grange shall be 
known and distinguished as Grange 

No. of the State of Pennsyl- 

vania. 

Sec, 2. The regular meetings of 
this Grange shall be held on 

Sec. 3. Special meetings may be 
called by the Grange, or the Master of 
the Grange, or in his absence by the 
Overseer, when deemed necessary for 
the good of the Grange. 

Seven members shail constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness; but a less number may ad- 
journ from time to time. 

Sec. 5. The Grange shall be opened 
at the appointed time, in the Fourth 
degree, if a suflfiicient number of 
members be present. 

ARTICLE II— MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 1. The members of this 
Grange are all who have been, or may 
be, initiated in, or aflSliate therewith; 
who have subscribed to the roll books, 
and who have not withdrawn, or been 
excluded for unworthy conduct or 
non-payment of dues. 

ARTICLE III — OFFICERS. 

The officers of this Grange shall be 
ranked and titled as follows : Master, 
Overseer, Lecturer, Steward, Assist- 
ant Steward, Chaplain, Treasurer, 
Secretary, Gate Keeper, Ceres, Po- 
mona, Flora and Lady Assistant Stew- 
ard. It is their duty to see that the 
laws of the Order are carried out. 

How Chosen. The ofllcers of this 
Grange shall be chosen annually at 
the last regular meeting in Decem- 
ber, and installed at the flrst regular 
meeting In January. All elections 
shall be by ballot. 



ARTICLE IV — DUTIES OF OFFI- 
CERS. 

Section 1. Master. It shall be the 
duty of the Master to preside at all 
meetings of the Grange, to see that 
all officers and members of commit- 
tees perform their respective duties, 
as enjoined by the several charges and 
these By-Laws; to inspect and an- 
nounce th^ result of all balloting and 
other votes of the Grange; see that 
all laws and usages of the Order are 
duly understood and obeyed; to sign 
all orders drawn on the Treasurer, 
with the consent and approbation of 
tbe Grange; and perform such other 
duties as may be required by the 
Ritual or Grange properly belonging 
to that oflfice. 

Sec. 2. Overseer. It shall be th'e 
duty of the Overseer to assist the 
Master in preserving order and de- 
corum in the Grange; preside in the 
absence of the Master; and perfprn* 
all other duties properly devolving 
upon that office. 

Sec. 3. Lecturer. It shall be the 
duty of the Lecturer to always be 
prepared with some useful informa- 
tion to read, or cause to be read; 
when no regular business is before 
the meeting; and see particularly 
that all addresses, lectures and other 
information provided for the good of 
the Order and . members of this 
Grange are distributed to them. 

Sec 4< Steward. It shall be the 
duty gf tbe Steward to presidte in the 
absences of the Master, Overseer or 
Past Master, to have charge of the- 
inner gate, to see that the field is 
properly prepared for labor, the 
working tools in their p^lace, to con- 
duct the ballots; to provide for the 
introduction and accommodation of 
candidates. 



^ 



PENNSYLVAiNIA GRANGE NEWS 



Sec. 5. Assistant Steward. It shall 
be the duty of the Assistant Steward 
to have charge of the candidates dur- 
ing the initiation, and to see that the 
regalias are properly distributed and 
cared for, also to give all due assist- 
•ance to the Steward. 

Section 6. Treasurer. It shall be 
the dutv of the Treasurer to receive 
all moneys from the Secretary, to 
keep an accurate account of said 
"moneys, and pay them out on the 
order of the Master, with the consent 
of the Grange, to render his books and 
statement of his accounts with the 
Grange to the Finance Committee 
when called upon to do so, and to 
deliver to his successor all moneys, 
books, vouchers, etc., having refer- 
ence to the finances of the Grange. 
'He shall be required to give bonds 
'in such sums as the Grange may 
"from time to time determine. 

Sec. 7. Secretary. It shall be the 
•duty of the Secretary to record ac- 
curately all the proceedings of the 
'Orange, to make out all necessary re- 
turns for the State and National 
Grange; to keep accurate accounts of 
members with the Grange; to re- 
ceive and pay over to the Treasurer 
■all moneys at the close of each meet- 
ing, taking his receipt therefor; to 
• draw and counter-sign all orders 
voted by the Grange, and to perform 
such other duties as may devolve 
upon that ofHce. 

He shall at the end of each quarter 
make out duplicate reports of the 
amount due the State Grange for 
'membership dues and fees for said 
quarter; these duplicates fthall be 
tslgned by the Master and Secretary, 
•49Lnd stamped with the seal of the 
•Orange, one copy to be filed with the 
(papers of the Grange and the other 
to be forwarded to the Secretary of 
the State Grange within three days 
*after the close of the quarter. 

He shall also draw the money due 
the State Grange from the Treasurer 
ot his Subordinate Grange, and trans- 
mit the same with the report to the 
Secretary of the State Grange. 

The Secretary shall receive a fee 
•of cents for each meeting of 

actual service. 

Sec, 8. Gate Keeper. It shall be 

the duty of the Gate Keeper to see 

'that the gates are properly guarded, 

-and to perform such other duties as 

'^may be required. 

ARTICLE V — APPLICATION FOR 
MEMBERSHIP. 

Application for membership must 
be made in the form prescribed by 
the National Grange, and when made, 
-shall be announced In open Grange, 
•and referred to a Committee of Inves- 
'tlgation, consisting of three brothers 
•«r sisters, two appointed by the 
34aster and one by the Overseer, which 



shall take the application in charge 
and report at the next regular meet- 
ing. 

ARTICLE VI— FEES AND DUES. 

Section 1. The minimum fee for 
conferring four degrees on males in 
this Grange shall he three dollars, 
for females shall be one dollar, pro- 
viding that the minimum fee for min- 
ors for males shall be one dollar and 
for females fifty cents. The money in 
all cases to accompany the applica- 
tion. 

Sec. 2. The regular dues of this 
Grange shall be cents per 

month for each member, to be paid 
at the beginning of each quarter. 

Sec. 3. A member failing to pay 
his or her dues, for a period of three 
months shall be notified of the same 
by the Secretary, and if the delin- 
quency is not paid or remitted by a 
vote of the Grange one month there- 
after, the member shall be suspended. 

Sec. 4. A member having been 
suspended for non-payment of dues 
shall be notified of the same, with 
the amount of dues stated upon the 
notice, and if payment is not made 
within two months the name of the 
delinquent shall be dropped from the 
roll. 

Sec. 5. A member having been 
suspended or dropped from the roll 
for non-payment of dues may, upon 
payment of the amount due, .be 
placed in full standing in the Grange 
by a majority vote of the same. 

Sec. 6. A suspended or expelled 
member, or one dropped from the 
rolls, shall not be entitled to any of 
the advantages or privileges of the or- 
der, nor to attend the meetings of any 
Grange. 

ARTICLE VII — COMMITTEES. 

Sec. 1. All special committees, un- 
less otherwise ordered, shall consist 
of three members each. 

Sec. 2. The Master on the night 
of his installation shall appoint a 
Standing Committee on Finance, to 
consist of three members. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the 
Committee on Finance to audit all 
bills and accounts previous to their 
being passed upon by the Grange, 
and they shall be authorized to exam- 
ine the books and accounts of any 
officer or member of any committee 
of the Grange, whenever they think 
proper, and shall report as speedily as 
possible on all matters they may have 
on hand. 

Sec. 4. At the first regular meeting 
In each year there shall be elected by 
ballot three Trustees, who shall have 
charge of all property of the Grange, 
as well as all business In which the 
Grange shall have an Interest. 

Sec. 5. The Master, Lecturer and 
Chaplain shall be a Committee on 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



9 



Library, and shall have charge of the 
same, the Lecturer acting as Li- 
brarian. They shall also constitute a 
committee of the Grange charged 
with the special duty of making pro- 
vision for the relief of members in 
affliction and distress. 

ARTICLE VIII — CHARGES. 

Sec. 1. If at any time it shall ap- 
pear that a member, by his or her 
general conduct, either morally or 
otherwise, shall be working against 
the best interests of the Order, charges 
may be preferred against the offend- 
ing member in accordance with the 
provisions of the following article, and 
they may be expelled, or subjected to 
such penalties as a majority of the 
Grange miay direct. 

Sec. 2. In no case shall members of 
a Grange enter into litigation with 
each other until they shall have pre- 
sented a plain statement of their dif- 
ferences to the Trustees of their 
Grange, and shall have allowed them 



an opportunity to adjust them if pos- 
sible. 

ARTICLE IX— SUSPENSIONS, 
WITHDRAWALS, ETC. 

Sec, 1. No member of this Grange 
shall be suspended or expelled from» 
membership unless charges be prefer- 
red in writing, duly specifying the of- 
fense, presented by a brother or sis- 
ter in good standing, and the accused 
be allowed full opportunity in all 
cases to make his or her defense. 

Sec. 2. Any member desirous of 
withdrawing from this Grange must 
pay all indebtedness thereto and ob- 
tain the consent of the Grange. 

ARTICLE X — AMENDMENTS. 
All propositions for amending or re- 
pealing these By-Laws, or any part of 
them, shall be presented in writing at 
a regular meeting, and shall lie over 
until the next regular meeting, when 
they may be acted upon if agreed to 
by two-thirds of all the members pres- 
ent. 



^i^tje %T^<^int^ic^^ ©crrnjer. 




T IS indeed pleasing to see 
the outspoken and general 
demand being made by 
many Granges for a maxi- 
mum two cent passenger 
rate on railroads. It has long been 
a source of unpleasantness to see the 
gross inequality the traveling public 
are subjected to in this, and why 
some should have free transporta- 
tion, some pay two cents a mile, 
while others pay three, when all re- 
ceive the same service, ride in the 
same cars, I never could understand 
the justice or equality of such man- 
agement or favoritism. Certainly it 
is not a Grange principle and we are 
glad to know that the Grange is ac- 
tive in the demand for a Square 
Deal, from the great transportation 
systems that seemingly assume to 
own the earth and the people thereof. 
Patrons, stand firm by the Grange 
and its principles. There are bright- 
er days ahead if we all do our duty 
manfully. 



Worthy Lecturers : — 

Again I suggest that you make 
an effort, if you-have not already done 
so, to lay out the educational, literary 



and entertaining work for your 
Grange. Well in advance harmon- 
ize and combine them so far as pos- 
sible, but give the educational fea- 
ture first consideration. By educa- 
tion, I mean the treating or consider- 
ing of any or all topics that will tend 
toward developing and storing the 
mind of the members with useful in- 
formation and by aiding the individu- 
al to have such knowledge available 
so it can be used when desired. This 
can be done by keeping everlastingly 
at it, as desirable things require ef- 
fort to procure. 

As we suggested last month, ar>- 
range the programs two, three ancJ 
six months in advance. Call it a 
schedule if you prefer, and try to 
have every train arrive and depart on 
time. Every member assigned a part 
should be prepared for duty whert 
their time comes. Members shouldi 
realize the fact that unless they arO' 
willing to do this, the effectual work 
of the Grange will be largely lost» 
individual responsibilities rest upon 
all, and results are obtained by con- 
certed effort. 

I have a few printed programs ar- 
ranged by Subordinate Granges and 



10 



3 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



will gladly mail you one of them for 
the asking, so long as they last; they 
perhaps would aid you with sugges- 
tive ideas in arranging programs for 
your Grange. 

Let me hear from you with your 
troubles as well as your successes; 
send a copy of your program; I will 
appreciate it very much. 



One of the greatest missions of the 
Grange is the developing and train- 
ing of the underlying principles of 
statesmanship among its members. 
The more I study the Order and care- 
fully note its effect upon individuals 
and communities where its teachings 
are accepted and actively applied, the 
more I become convinced of this 
truth : To possess the essentials of a 
»tatesman one must have a high 
character combined with a deep love 
for his people and his country and 
use his efforts to improve the condi- 
tions surrounding them, by estab- 
lis'hing the greatest possible degree of 
justice and equality in the customs 
and laws under which they exist and 
to see that the weak are protected 
from the strong and vicious. 

The value of the Grange along 
these lines will be appreciated more 
and more as time moves on and the 
agricultural people rise to the full 
understanding of the importance of 
the position they occupy, as factors 
of society and the responsibilities of 
citizenship. 

A partisan politician many times 
comes far from practicing the essen- 
tials of a statesman. The one plac- 
ing success of party first or perhaps 
self first, party isecond and the wel- 
fare of the people last, while the 
other having that patriotic love of 
4iis country is giving his first consid- 
■eration and effort to advance the wel- 
fare of "The greatest good to the 
greatest number." 

It will be well for Patrons in Penn- 
sylvania to consider these and )cind- 
red topics for the next few months 
\Then important offices are to be fil- 
led, to correct, enact and execute 
laws, whether the party politicians or 

It would seem that the time is now 
the statesman shall be chosen, 
opportune for decisive aggressive ac- 



tion toward a cleaner, higher, more 
equitable order of government that 
will place manhood above lucre, 
justice above graft, favoritism and 
class legislation. 



The Grange develops character 
culture and citizenship; it also teach- 
es that cultivation and co-operation 
bring compensation. 



GRANGE TOPICS FOR JUNE. 



Suggested by the National Grange. 

Why are people in favor of more 
stringent pure food laws ? 

Why should Grange field meetings 
be held and attended ? 

When should grass be cut and how 
cured to yield the most valuable hay 
crop ? 



Additional Topics for Consideration. 

What is the best ration for a horse 
doing heavy work in warm weather ? 

Would it not be well to dispense 
with the electoral college, and elect 
the President by popular vote ? 

How many times should corn be 
cultivated to get best results ? 



Eb and Flo. 



Flo was fond of Ebenezer — 
Eb, for short, she called her beau. 

Talk of "tide of love"— great Ceasar! 
You should see 'em, Eb and Flo. 

— Oornell Widow. 

Eb and Flo they stood as sponsors 
When Flo's sister was a bride. 

And when bride and groom receded 
They, too, went out with the tied. 

— Yonkers Statesman. 

.When their first child came — a daughter. 

The nurse, for a larger fee. 
Went to some one else who sought her. 
Leaving Eb and Flo at sea. 

— Chicago Record-Herald. 

Daughter's given name was Cooper — 
"Coo" for short; and when she grew 

Her beau's name was William Hooper. 
Y'ou should see 'em, Bill and Coo. 

— Cleveland Leader. 

They were married — had a daughter — 
Name: Hemina — ^and she saw 

And wed a man whose name was Hawley 
You should see 'em, Hem and Haw. 

— Milwaukee Sentinel. 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



11 



l^]ejgt3$l^ii)tt^ ©ornttnitijeje IBjepartntjeni^ 

W. T. CREASY, Editor. 




The Railroad Rate Question. 

IT A MEETING of the State 
Grange Legislative Com- 
mittee, lield at Harris- 
burg, May 5, 1906, tlie 
CO m m i t t e e formulated 
questions to be aslted candidates at 
this coming campaign. Those ques- 
tions appear elsewhere in this issue. 
Some of our members may ask 
why we omitted the initiative and 
referendum, this we did because there 
is a party now by that name that will 
look after this matter and we thought 
that it would be best to give them our 
support and have them question the 
candidates. I am convinced more 
than ever that the initiative and re- 
ferendum is the only plan to enact 
good legislation and check or veto 
vicious acts of law making bodies or 
councils or boards that act for the 
people. 

At this meeting we sent the follow- 
ing telegram to His Excellency, Hon. 
Theodore Roosevelt, President of the 
United States : 

"Harrisburg, May 5-, 1906. 
We, the Legislative Committee of 
the Pennsylvania State Grange ,in be- 
half of our organization, beseech you 
to stand true to your original position 
on rate regulation. We '^ledge you 
the united support of our members 
to this end. 

Signed by W. F. HILL, 

E. B. DORSETT, 
W, T. CREASY, 

Committee." 

To this telegram the President sent 
the following reply : — 

"W. F. Hill and Members Legislative 

Committee, Pennsylvania State 

Grange, Harrisburg, 'Pa. 

Telegram received. I am happy to 
tell you that not only am I standin<r 
on my original position as regards 
rate legislation, but it seems likely 
that Congress will take this position, 
too. 

The Hepburn bill meets my views, 
as I have from the beginning stated. 
The Allison amendment is only de- 
claratory of what the Hepburn bill 
must mean, supposing it to be con- 
stitutional, and no genuine friend -jof 
the bill can object to it without stulti- 
fying himself. 



In addition I should be glad to g^t 
certain amendments, such as those 
commonly known as the Long and 
Overman amendments; but they are 
not vital, and even without them the 
Hepburn bill, with the Allison amend- 
ment, contains practically exactly 
what I have both originally 
and always since asked for, and if en- 
acted into law, it will represent the 
longest step ever yet taken in the di- 
rection of solving the rate problem. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT," 

In commenting on this telegram, 
the correspondent of one of the great 
newspapers adds the following : 

Protest Expected. 

In spite of the President's view of 
the situation, there is bitter disap- 
pointment among those who had been* 
most heartily supporting his policy, 
and an outburst of protest can hardly 
be prevented in the discussion of tlie- 
measure by the Senate this week. 

That the Hepburn bill does take a 
long' step in the direction of railroad' 
regulation no one can question. It 
recognizes the propriety of conferring 
the rate-making power upon the 
Interstate Commerce Commission^ 
and in its definition of transportation 
facilities brings within the jurisdictioni 
of the commission all terminal fa- 
cilities, private car lines, processes of 
refrigeration and the numerous 
other devices that heretofore have 
been effectively used by the railroads- 
and their trust allies to discriminate 
against the ordinary shipper. 

Now as the readers well know the 
contention all along ha^sL^een not to 
permit the courts to hold up any 
rate fixed by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission until It was declared un- 
constitutional or wrong by the Su- 
preme Court of the United States-. 
And this point would have been 
gained if the President had not been 
"hons-woggled" Into the belief that it 
could not pass in that form. You 
will observe that under the amend- 
ment as appears below the courts 
can issue injunctions If three judges 
sign it. The substance of the amend- 
ment is as follows : , 

The courts are to have unlimited 
jurisdiction to review the orders of 
the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
but no injunctions setting aside or 



12 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



suspending: such orders prior to a 
final decision shall be issued without 
five days' notice to the commission 
and a hearing of the commission's 
side of the case. In addition to this, 
injunction cannot be issued by any 
one Judge, but must be agreed to by 
three Judges. 

Appeal from an injunction or any 
other interlocutory decree is to be 
taken directly to the Supreme 
Court of the United States, and pro- 
vision is made for its hearing by the 
■court in advance of all other except 
criminal cases. 

The words "fairly remunerative," 
which were insisted upon by Senator 
Knox when the bill was first drawn, 
and found to be exceedingly objec- 
tionable, are to be stricken out, so 
that the provision will be that rates 
shall be just and reasonable only. 

The words "in its judgment," con- 
ferring discretionary power upon the 
commission, objected to by the rail- 
road side, are to remain in the meas- 
ure. 

The commission is also authorized 
to decide at what tim,e its orders shall 
become effective so as to deal prop- 
•erly with such cases as require im- 
mediate action. 

Many of our courts are very 
"wobbling," and are selected by the 
railroad monopolies of the country. 
If a shipper can be held up by a 
court with an injunction on a rate 
'fixed by the Interstate Commission, he 
may be dead before it is decided. The 
•cases of the independent oil refiners 
of our State is an example of this. 
■For 17 years they have been unable 
■to have a decision. In a ,coal land 
case in our State the matter was 
-dragged along from one court to an- 
other for thirty-five years, and in the 
end the poor, litigant and rightful 
owner had to yield to a very unfair 
settlement. Is it any wonder that 
the common people are losing confl- 
•dence in our courts ? 

But as the bill is not yet passed 
we will withhold further comment 
until the next issue. There is no 
doubt that the telegram of our com- 
mittee and the reply by the President 
.put the friends of rate regulation on 
the alert and so better terms will be 
■secured than the President finally 
•agreed to. 

We were criticised by some news- 
papers saying that the President was 
not the law-making body and there- 
fore should not dictate the laws. 
This is very true and if we had a 
United Statts Senate representing the 



people instead of special interests 
there would be no need of asking the 
President to stand by a bill or insist 
on its passage. This is another reas- 
on why United States Senators should 
be elected by a direct vote of the 
people. 

I have dwelt on this rate question 
because it is of the greatest import- 
ance to have the powers of the rail- 
roads curbed; and also to show the 

relation between Interstate Commerce 
and State traffic. 

One of our questions relates to the 
enforcement of our present State 
Constitution as I outlined in the 
March number of the Grange News. 
The United States Congress cannot 
legislate on a matter that is purely 
a State right. It was brought out in 
tlie United States Senate in offering an 
amendment to prohibit railroads from 
mining coal or manufacturing coke, 
etc., by Senator Bailey, the greatest 
constitutional lawyer in that body, 
that, "We cannot prohibit a railroad 
from doing within a State anything 
the laws permit; but we can prohibit 
railroads from engaging in Interstate 
commerce unless they comply with 
the requirements of the Federal Stat- 
ute." So you will see that it is very 
important to have our constitution en- 
forced. 



The Free Alcohol bill passed the 
House at Washington and is now in 
the hands of the Finance Committee 
of the United States Senate. 

The Committee is made up of the 
following Senators : , 

Nelson W. Aldrich,of Rhode Island, 
chairman; William B. Allison, of 
Iowa; Julius C. Burrows, of Michi- 
gan; Thomas C. Piatt, of New York; 
Henry C. Hansborugh, of North Da- 
kota; John C. Spooner, of Wisconsin; 
Boise Penrose, of Pennsylvania; 
Eugene Hale, of Maine, John W. 
Daniel, of Virginia; Henry M. Teller, 
of Colorado; Hernando D. Money, of 
Mississippi;Joseph W.Bailey,of Texas; 
Arthur P. Gorman, of Maryland. 

Write them a postal or at least 
some of them and tell them plainly 
that you want the bill pass d. It will 
help a great deal. Don't forget to 
write. Farmers want this passed at 
this session of Congress. 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



13 



A SUGGESTED FARMERS' PLATFORM. 

At a conference of leading Grange workers and representative members 
of agricultural organizations, held at Harrisburg, March 2, the following 
basic propositions were suggested as the farmers' platform for the State and 
county campaign of 1906. We ask all political parties to assert the same In 
their respective platforms, and that candidates for the various State offices, 
including the House and Senate shall be pledged to support these reforms. 

Tl\e Grange VTantsx 

(1) Trolleys to be given the right to carry freight. 

(2) Every candidate to pledge to not accept personal transportation 
favors from any transportation company during the term of office to which 
he aspires. We commend the "No Pass" order of the railroad companies. 

(3) We want the corporations to live up to the Constitution of the 
State. 

The mining of coal by transportation companies, directors furnishing sup- 
plies to their own corporations, the owning or operating or parallel or com- 
peting lines we want stopped. 

(4.) We want no discrimination in freight rates. 
Uniform passenger rate of two cents a mile. 
Licenses and personal property taxes returned to the counties. 
Equalization in taxation. 

An increase of State aid for township roads from 15 to 50 per cent. 
An increased appropriation for centralized township schools; also, 
township high schools. 

Are you for these reforms ? 

If so, help agitate. Tell your neighbor and get his help. 
It is recommended that voters everywhere see to it that only men pledged 
to support these measures be placed in nomination. Legislative Committees 
of Granges and other farm organizations should see that candidates are 
pledged to these measures. 



(5.) 
(6.) 
(7.) 
(8.) 
(9.) 



Questions for Granges to Submit to Legislative Candidates. 

^^rite for BlanRs. 



Hon. 



Dear Sir : — 

We are informed that you are a candidate to represent this County in the 
coming session of the Legislature. Such an aspiration is commendable and 
as your constituents have a right to know the position you will take upon 
measures of general lniTH>rtance we are submitting to all candidates for llie 
Legislature the accompanying interrogatories. Answers are expected within 
ten days. They will then be published hi "Pennsylvania Grange News" and 
copies will be sent to each Grange. Your answer will therefore be referred 
to your constituents and their votes in November will indicate the approval Oi? 
rejection of your position upon these measures of general public interest. 

If elected will you support the foUovting ? Please answer yes or no t)o 
each. 

1. Win you vote to give trolleys the right to carry freight ? 

2. Do you pledge yourself to not accept personal transportation favors 
from any transportation company during your term of office ? 

3. Will you support a bill for a uniform passenger rate of two cents a 
mile ? 

4. Will you favor enforcing the Constitution of Pennsylvania, especially 
the seventeenth article relative to the powers and duties of transportation 
companies ? 

5. Will you support a measure to permit the counties to retain all of 
the personal property and license taxes ? 

6. Will you favor an increase of State aid for township roads from fif- 
teen to fifty per cent. ? 

7. Will you favor an increased appropriation for centralized township 
jschools, also for townsliip high schools ? 

8. Will you favor equalization of taxation ? 



14 



PENNSTLVAJ^IA GRANGE NEWS 



FREIGHT BY TROLLEY. 



It is somewhat amusing how the 
railroad interests are opposed to 
trolleys carrying freight and also how 
short-sighted some borough councils 
seem to be, as will be seen by tlie 
following resolution passed by the 
New Brighton Borough Council : 

Whereas, it is common rumor that 
an effort will be made, at the next 
session of the Legislature of Penn- 
sylvania to authorize street railway 
companies in this state to transport 
freieht. 

And whereas such authority- would 
be detrimental to all persons who use 
the streets of our borough and cities 
along with the street railway com- 
panies; 

And whereas the grant of such 
authority raises questions of public 
policy which were not considered by 
municipal authorities when the pres- 
ent rights to use the streets of our 
boroughs and cities were granted to 
the street railwa-^'- companies. 

Now be it resolved by the Town 
Council of the Borough of New Brigh- 
ton that this borough protest against 
any legislation granting to street rail- 
way companies the right to transoprt 
freight within any city or borousrh. 

Resolved, That we ask the boroughs 
and cities of the State to join in this 
protest. 

Copies of the resolution will be pre- 
sented to the boroughs -of the State 
through the litigation committee and 
city attorney. 

In answer to these resolutions we 
present the trolley bill as offered at 
the last regular session of the legis- 
lature. It will be noticed that the bill 
expiressly provides 'Uhat provisions 
of the act be subject to the regula- 
tions of Borough and city councils." 

Our bill reads as follows : 

Be it enacted, &c., That any street 
railway company, heretofore or here- 
after incorporated under the laws of 
this Commonwealth, whether under 
a general or a special law, and any 
traction motor company, lessee of the 
whole or any part of the lines of any 
street railway company is hereby au- 
thorized to carry freight and to 
charge and collect a reasonable com- 
pensation therefor and any limitation 
In the charter of any such company 
as aforesaid which • restricts to the 
carriage of passengers only, Is hereby 
repealed. Provided that the provis- 
ions of this act be subject to the reg- 



ulations of Borough and city councils. 
While attending the National good 
roads' congress in Detroit, in 1903, I 
saw the trolleys carry freight in that 
city and in reply to a letter from the 
manager of the Detroit lines, I find 
the law of Michigan Is about the 
same that we are asking for. His 
letter is as follows : — 

Detroit, Mich., March 27, 1906. 
Hon. Wm. F. Creas" Secy., 

Penn'a. State Grange Leg. Com., 
Catawissa, Pa. 
Dear Sir : — 

Replying to your letter of the 22d, 
inst. 

Our interurban lines are construct- 
ed partly on the highway and partly 
on private right of way. In cities 
our lines are constructed in the pub- 
lic streets and highways. In this 
State the State Law provides that 
we may handle freight on electric 
railways, provided, however, that in 
cities the handling thereof must be 
subject to such rules and regulations 
as may be adopted by the city govern- 
ments. In this city the regulations 
provide that not more than one 
freight or express car or train shall 
pass over one line In each two hour 
period. 

The express and freight service as 
rendered by us was started in a very 
small way. We are now having some 
difficulty to meet the demands of the 
traffic, because our matrons have 
found it most convenient, insuring 
quick and reliable delivery at low 
rates. Primarily, we are engaged In 
the business of handlir'~ passenger 
traffic, but our policy has been to> 
make such use of our lines as the 
public seems to require. Accordingly 
the business of handling merchandise 
and farm produce has grown into 
considerable proportions. I trust that 
I have answered your letter. 
Yours truly, 
F. W. BRENARD, 
Die. F.W.B. Asst. Gen. Mgr. 

The i;«ader will note that one sen- 
tence in his reply, namely : "We are 
now having some difficulty to meet 
the demands of the traffic, because 
our patrons have found It most con- 
venient, insuring quick and reliable 
delivery at low rates." 

Comment is unnecessary. Remem- 
ber that this kind of transportation: 
Is an advantage not only to the farm- 
er but the town resident, as It will 
cheapen the cost of what he buys In 
the way of vegetables, etc., possibly 



PENNSYLVANIA GORANGB NEWS 



15 



fifteen or twenty per cent and the 
farmer will still make more than he 
now does by spending a lot of time in 
marlceting and hauling his produce. 

New Brighton Borough Council will 
not And many followers of this non- 
progressive plan. 

The next legislature will pass this 
measure if the Grange and others 
interested will look after the election 
of the right men to our State offices. 



The State Grange Legislative Com- 
mittee joined the "Homeless 26" in 
3. meeting at Harrisburg on April 12, 
1906, in favor of a two cent fare and 
trolley freight. Herewith we give a 
synopsis of the remarks of the Sec- 
retary of the Homeless 26, Mr. S. M. 
Williams : 

He said in part : 

"On January 4th of this year, "The 
Homeless 26" addressed a letter to 
the Governor of this State renuesting 
that in the issuing of his supplemental 
•call for the special session of the leg- 
islature that he include legislation 
providing for the re-adjustment of 
rates for passenger transportation. 
To this letter we received a replv. 
signed by his private secretary stating 
that the matter would have care- 
ful consideration. We were dis- 
appointed, however, In reading the 
call, to find that he did not refer to 
the matter and notwithstanding that 
•during the session numerous attempts 
were made to impress upon him the 
necessity and demand for fairness, not 
as alleged by certain railway officials 
that It was upon the part of disan- 
pointed individuals who were unable 
to secure free transportation, but up- 
on the part of a very large percentage 
of the citizens of the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania. Notwithstanding 
these facts and that the Legislature 
did finally pass a resolution request- 
ing the Governor to allow considera- 
tion of such legislation, we were again 
disappointed in his refusal. I do not 
say this in criticism of the Governor, 
possibly his decision was in view of 
■his desire th^t the State should not 
"be burdened by the expenses of a pro- 
longed session, but we are glad to 
«ay that since that time, he has stated 
Tils approval and appreciation of the 
•efforts being made to secure a reduc- 
tion in the cost of passenger trans- 
j)ortation upon steam railways. 

In the State of Pennsylvania, we 
"find certain railroads that, in the 
question of nassenger transportation, 
are unreasonable and without prece- 
dent in any other line of business 
operating under the laws of the 
State. 



Railroads exist because of the privi- 
leges granted them by the pubUo 
through our legislative bodies. Such 
privileges should be allowed only 90 
long as their rates are reasonable and 
their service nrompt and efficient. 

The duties of a common carrier 
should be performed with a view of 
protecting commerce and public In- 
terest in general. Every shipper as 
well as every passenger, is entitled 
to be assured by our government that 
the public service ot railroads will 
cost his competitor the same price 
which he is required to pay. There- 
fore, it is not proper for the State 
to protect public service companies 
in extorting unjust charges from their 
consumer. 

Corporations are combinations of 
individuals and should not be looked 
upon differently or favored further 
In the passage of laws by our legisla- 
tive bodies than the individual citi- 
zen. 

There was a time when the com- 
mercial men of this count- looked 
upon the matter of passenger trans- 
portation in a somewhat selfish light, 
but to-day we realize that what is 
best for the greatest majority will be 
a benefit to all. 

Instead of assisting for the pas- 
sage of a law which if constitutional 
would require the railroads to issue a 
hiileage book at a reduced rate, we 
feel in view of the fact that it haia 
been proven by a number of railroads 
(with just as much responsibility as 
the Pennsylvania and other roads op- 
erating under the Trunk Line Mileage 
Bureau) that passenger transporta- 
tion may be furnished with the very 
best accommodations with a resonable 
profit at two cents per mile, and that 
what we are asking is only fair and 
right when we demand a rate of two 
cents per mile for passenger travel 
In the State of Pennsvlvania. We 
hope that the railroads realizing as 
they must the fairness of the demand, 
(and the fact that it is only a question 
of time when a two cent rate will 
exist throughout the entire country) 
will concede the reduction to their pa- 
trons, but if not, let us decide to-day 
to foro-et our own individualities, so 
far as organizations are concerned, and 
determine to work shoulder to shoul- 
der for the election of such ncien to 
the legislature of the State of Penn- 
sylvania whom we may depend upon 
as being fair and who will vote for 
legislation that will be favorable to all 
of the people and not a few individ- 
uals. Let us also determine that In 
the selection of a Governor, whether 
he be a Republican or a Democrat 
that we will have a man whose ap- 
proval will be given to such legisla- 
tion. 

Electric Railways. 

For years the electric railways in 
the State of Pennsylvania have been 
hampered because they were not al- 



16 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANOB NEWS 



lowed the privilege to which they 
were entitled. Why should not the 
electric railways of our State be al- 
lowed the privilege of carrying 
freight ? 

In what way do the conditions dif- 
fer in the State of Pennsylvania from 
those of Ohio and Indiana whose 
electric railways are far superior to 
the ones in the State of Pennsylvania, 
notwithstanding the fact tliat the 
States are not so thickly populated ? 

It may be that the commercial man 
and the man who travels freely is 
more interested in steam railwavs 
than in electric railways, but by 
bringing together an affiliation of or- 
ganizations as we have here to-day, 
we will be able to assist one another, 
presenting- a stronger front than if 
we simply fought for what interests 
ourselves individually." 



Up to date the Auditor General's 
report of Pennsylvania for the years 
1904 and 1905 are not at hand. Why 
is this ? — 

The State Constabulary or "Rus- 
sian Cossacks" did some service of 
late by shooting a number of innocent 
persons in Mt. Carmel. Prom what 
I know of the situation it was en- 
tirely uncalled for and there would 
have been no disturbance if these 
"Cossacks"" had been kept out of the 
town. At a cost of $5,000 a mile, 
the sum spent for these idlers would 
build 100 miles of good roads 
every two years. Which is worth the 
most, the "Cossacks" or 100 miles of 
good roads ? 






Mjggjete Cront il^je ^t^ije ^je^crjei^rg^ 



Would that I were able to say the 
word that would lead every farmer 
in the land to join the Grange, Did 
they do it our class would receive 
such recognition as has never before 
been accorded to them. Were the 
farmers organized as they should be 
they would be first in influence as 
they are first in point of numbers and 
as the products of their labors are 
first in importance. This has so often 
been said and the truth of it is so 
apparent that the wonder is that so 
many farmers yet stand aloof- 



Since last report new Granges have 
been organized as follows : 

No. 1319, Bradford County, by Asa 
S. Stevens, with 35 members. Master, 
H. E. Grace, Troy, R. D. No. 63; lec- 
turer, Mrs. F, N. Hubbard, Troy, R, 

D. No. 63; secretary, Mrs. H. E. 
Grace, Troy, R. D. No, 63. 

No. 1320, Venango County, by W. 

E. Thompson, with 44 members. Mas- 
ter, J. C. August, Diamond; lecturer, 
M. A. Spoor, Diamond; secretary, Vic- 
tor Guild, Diamond. 



The following has been reorgan- 
ized : 

No. 804, Elk County, by H. H. Hall, 
with 21 members. Master, Mrs. Mary 
Maken, Benezette; secretary, Ernest 
Maken, Benezette. 



Trolley freight, two cent fares, in- 
creased appropriation for public 
roads, enforcement of the constitu- 
tion in regard to railroad passes, 
common carriers engaging in mining" 
or other business for which they are 
not chartered, reduction of taxation 
on real estate by returning^ to the 
counties fees and licenses, increasing: 
the school appropriation so as to- 
cover the entire cost of the public 
schools, with decided progress, if not 
final adoption of the initiative and 
referendum are possibilities at the 
hands of the next legislature if those 
who want them will stand together 
and demand them. More especially 
will this be so if they will look to the 
primary elections now being held and 
the general election later on and send 
their due share of petitions with' 
boots on to Harrisburg. 

Brother Farmer, is there not 
enough in all this for you to lead 
you to wish to co-operate in securing* 
it ? You will effectively co-operate- 
by joining the Grange and thus stand 
shoulder to shoulder with those who 
are pushing these reforms. 

"In the multitude of counsellora 
there is wisdom." The truth of thi» 
has often been demonstrated and 
seldom with more force than in the 
action of the miners in their recent 
convention. The individual miner Ini- 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



17 






pelled by his sense of Injustice and 
his feelings of resentment would have 
struck even though by so doing he 
would have struck himself the hard- 
est blow. The best place for him to 
strike is at the polls and there are 
indications that he will do it. Is 
there not a lesson in this for the 
farmer ? 



The next meetin of Butler County 
Pomona Grange, No. 17, will be held 
in the new hall of Eureka Grange. 
There is a, movement on foot to dedi- 
cate the hall in connection with this 
meeting so the date is not definitely 
determined at the time of this writ- 
ing. 



A Big Grange Meeting at Cory don. 

As the result of a content which 
has been going on in Corydon Grange, 
No. 1205, Warren County, for some 
months, the defeated side was to 
furnish a supper and a "big time" to 
the winning side. 

The time for the event had been 
set, and when the hour for opening 
had arrived, a large company had 
assembled. Even the members of 
Warren Grange, 20 miles away, 
sniffed the air and their olfactory 
organs brought them messages of 
stewed oysters, chocolate cake and 
doughnuts. 

Following true to the scent, they 
landed in Corydon. From Bradford, 
Scandia, Kinzua and Pleasant 
Granges, the memljers came until the 
hall presented the appearance of a 
county Pomona. The 3d and 4th de- 
grees being conferred and the other 
business of the Grange being com- 
pleted, all repaired to the dining hall 
where between 90 and 100 hungry 
mouths were fed. Sister Willie 
Crooks, head of the winning side, was 
decorated by Sister Laura Ensign 
of the defeated side, with the Ameri- 
can flag and a banner inscribed : "To 
the victors belong the spoils," which 
she wore with the air of a conqueror. 
Supper ended, the body was called to 
order and a very pleasant session 
spent In listening to speeches inter- 
spersed with songs, stories, music, 
etc. 



At the late hour of 2 a. m., on the 
following day, the closing ceremonies 
were heard and the members dis- 
persed, bearing another picture to- 
hang on memory's wall. 

A. W. REEVES, Sec. 



One business man in a hundred 
succeeds. One farmer in a hundred 
fails. The ninety-nine farmers who- 
succeed envy the one business man 
who succeeds, and never give a 
thought to the ninety-nine business 
failures. Such is the mental tangle- 
men weave. 

The above from the "New York 
Farmer" is pretty true to life. We 
are apt to long for the things we do 
not have and to yearn to be in some 
other business than the one in which 
we are engaged and for which we are 
qualified. This is true not alone of 
farmers, but applies to men in other 
vocations. People are prone to over- 
estimate their troubles and disad- 
vantages and to fail to give credit 
to the comforts and blessings they 
have, and may have. It is true that 
people sometimes get tied up with 
some kind of vocation that fails to- 
-appeal to their enthusiasm, but a 
genius can succeed wherever he may 
be. 

It will soon manifest itself in a, 
farmer and the Grange helps to 
bring it out. Many farmers and 
farmers' wives trace their inspiring- 
genius and success directly to their 
membership in the Grange. Let 
Granges everywhere contrive to de- 
velop and encourage genius and so- 
lead men and women on to better 
things and to nobler purposes. 



A liady Master. 

Lenox No. 931, Susquehanna Co., 
has a lady master. Bro.Van Etter says- 
that accounts for the fact that they 
are adding members at every meet- 
ing. 

[Sister Bennett is a good worker. 
When has a lady ofllcer been known 
that did not try to do well her part ?] 
— Ed. 



This is the natural growing season. 
Are you sowing and cultivating so- 
that the harvest of new members will 
be an abundant one ? 



18 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Ciirange 847 Warren County Doing 
WeU. 

We are. having, very interesting 
meetings this year. We had an open 
meeting some time ago and served 
refreshments. I Issued about 50 in- 
vitations a good many of them were 
not accepted. It is strange how in- 
different many farmers are. We are 
planning to have a children's day on 
the 9th of June. It will be an all- 
day session as we will have a class to 
give the third and fourth degrees, too. 

Penn'a. Grange News is certainly 
a very fine paper. I enjoy it very 
much. I often wonder when you 
get time to edit it, as there is so 
much in it. Fraternally, 

M. WOODSIDE, 
Secy. Sugar Grove Grai;ige. 



front. We have a Legislative Com- 
mittee composed of active members. 
Our meetings are well attended by 
the brothers and sisters. The meet- 
ings are instructive and interesting. 
The Worthy Lecturer has a program 
for each meeting in which the mem- 
bers take part; also a question box 
so the members can ask questions. 
We own our hall, have it almost out 
of debt and well furnished; so we 
are all right. 

A. B. WILSON. 

Master. 



Appreciates a Good Thing. 

Some one has kindly placed in my 
hand a copy of the "Grange News," 
and I wish that it might be placed 
in every farmer's family in our State 
I understand 25 cents per year Is the 
price, which amount I forward in 
stamps. Yours fraternally, 

Z. T. CURE. 



Woodcock Centre Grange No. 1034, 
Crawford County, has 120 members in 
good standing and getting new 
names every meeting. All Granges 
in old Crawford are coming to the 



Mercer County Pomona Grange 
meets Thursday, August 2d, in the 
hall of Deer Creek Grange. 



THE PEOPLE vs. THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD. 

Written for Grange Neius. 




I HERE is no subject that is 
at this time agitating the 
public mind more than the 
relation of the great cor- 
porations to the people. As 
a general proposition this subject is 
of prime importance, but a particular 
instance of it Is the power of the 
railroads to charge the rate of three 
cents per mile ordinarily and to de- 
mand a deposit of ten dollars from 
the purchaser of a twenty-dollar 
mileage book. 

A very large portion of the public 
is demanding that the legislature take 
action in the matter, and that there 
be ordained a flat rate of two cents 
per mile for all roads. The railroads, 
■on the other hand, claim that under 
the terms of their Incorporation the 
"legislature has no power to interfere 
in the premises. As this discussion 
applies primarily to the Pennsylva- 
nia Railroad I will deal with it alone. 
Has the State the power to inter- 
fere with the conduct of the Penn- 



sylvania railroad ? Is that corpora- 
tion amenable to the Constitution 
and the laws of the Commonwealth, 
or Is it an independent body over 
which the people are not sovereign ? 
These are questions frequently heard, 
and for answer we must look to the 
constitution and the laws of the 
Commonwealth. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany was incorporated by act of the 
legislature in 1846. It was then giv- 
en the power to charge such rates for 
the conveyance of passengers "as to 
the president and directors shall 
seem reasonable;" provided however 
that "no charge shall be made to ex- 
ceed three cents per mile for through 
passengers, and three and one-half 
cents per mile for way passengers." 

Because the act of incorporation al- 
lows the company to charge a maxi- 
mum rate of three cents per mile for 
through passengers it is urged that 
the authority of the government is 
powerless to interfere with the sov- 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



1» 



ereign will of the Pennsylvania rail- 
road. But let us see whether the 
legislature of 1846 gave to this cor- 
poration an inextinguishable right in 
perpetuity, thereby making it a 
higher power that the government 
Itself or the people from whom all 
authority springs. 

In the first and last analysis the 
question resolves itself into this, 
"What is best for the public good ?" 
The whole policy of this government, 
and of all others since civilization has 
held isway, is and has been to con- 
serve the public good and to permit 
no private interest to stand in the 
way. Wherever public good is op- 
posed by private interest the latter 
must yield, and this principle cannot 
be bartered away by any legislature 
under any guise whatsoever. An in- 
istance of this, which proves the in- 
alienable right of the body politic 
to suspend private right for the pub- 
lic weal, is found in the principle 
of eminent domain, of which I shall 
deal fully in a later article. The right 
of private property is fundamental 
to government and yet the power to 
infringe it pro bono publico cannot be 
given away by the government. The 
legislature cannot suspend its own 
right of eminent domain, however 
much it may try, and the property 
of corporations is by no mean® ex- 
empted from its exercise. Note the 
constitution : "The exercise of the 
right of eminent domain shall never 

be abridged or so construed as to 
prevent the General Assembly from 
taking the property and franchise of 
incorporated companies, and subject- 
ing them to public use, the same as 
the property of individuals." 

The right of eminent domain is but 
one instance of the power of the gov- 
ernment to conserve the public good 
even at the expense of private 
right. The framers of the constitu- 
tion of 1874 thought it of so great 
importance that they incorporated it 
Into that document. Section 3, of 
Article XVI says that "the exercise 
of the police power of the State shall 
never be so construed as to permit cor- 
porations to conduct their business 
In such manner as to infringe the 
equal rights of Individuals or the 
general well-being of the St^,te." 



And Section 17 of Article I provide* 
that "no law making irrevocable any 
grant of special privileges or immu'- 
nities, shall be passed." 

But the constitution applies this 
principle even more directly in Sec- 
tion 10 of Article XVI where it vest* 
in the General Assembly the power 
"to alter, revoke or annul any char- 
ter of incorporation existing and re- 
vocable at the time of the adoption 
of the constitution, whenever in the- 
opinion of the Assembly the charter 
may be injurious to the citizens of 
the Commonwealth." Here again 
the crucial test is the public well- 
fare. 

It is apparent that this is a funda- 
mental principle, and the contention 

that any corporation has ever been 
given a right which cannot be taken 

away even for the good of the public 

is repugnant to the whole system of 

civilized government. No legislature 

has the power to confer such a right, 

and the legislature of 1846 could not 

have done so even if it would. 

But the legislature of 1846 did 
not even try to do any such thing. 
It expressly and in specific term* 
made revocable all the rights and 
powers granted by the charter of in. 
corporation of the Pennsylvania 
railroad. It provided that the books 
of the corporation shall at all times- 
be open to the inspection of a com- 
mittee of the legislature, and that 
"whenever any committee as afore- 
said shall find and report or the gov- 
ernor shall have reason to believe- 
that the charter has been violated, 
it may be lawful for the legislature- 
to direct, or the governor to order" 
the proceedings whereby the charter 
may be revoked. In this case the en- 
tire property of the corporation shall" 
revert to and be vested in the Com- 
monwealth, but the Commonwealtl* 
shall pay the stockholders the par 
value of the stock. 

The power of the legislature, there- 
fore, to rekove the charter cannot be 
questioned. Under this clause of th& 
act of incorporation it can be revoked 
for a violation of the*^ charter, and if 
the enforcement , of a ten dollar de- 
posit on a twenty-dollar mileage 
book is an act of banking, as 
is contended, then the corporation has 



20 



PBNNSTIiVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



clearly violated Its charter, and Is 
therefore subject to the clause quoted 
above. The act of incorporation 
■contains this proviso : "That nothing 
herein contained shall be so construed 
as in any way giving to said corpora- 
tion any banking privileges what- 
-ever." 

But there Is still a more summary 
manner in which the charter may be 
revoked. The act of incorporation 
says that the legislature of the state 
may at the » expiration of twenty 
years from the completion of the 
railroad take all the property of the 
corporation and vest it in the people 
of the State, but the State must in 
this case pay the company for its 
property and provide full compensa- 
tion for all its expenditures in con- 
struction, equipment, etc. The act 
provides that "if the legislature shall 
not, at the expiration of the said 
period of twenty years, claim the said 
railroad, and so forth, as aforesaid, 
then the said company, with all Its 
said rights and privileges, shall con- 
tinue for another period of twenty 
years, subject to the claim of the leg- 
islature, as aforesaid, at the expira- 
tion thereof, on the same terms and 
conditions, as aforesaid, and so on, 
from twenty years to twenty years." 

It may be regarded as coincidental 
that this agitation as to the rev.oca- 
bility of the Pennsylvania railroad's 
charter comes in the year 1906, which 
marks the expiration of the third 
twenty-year period since the passage 
of the act of incorporation in 1846. 
At the end of each twenty years the 
legislature has a peculiar right of re- 
sumption under the act of incorpora- 
tion; and it is just now the end of 
one of these periods. 

It seems perfectly plain that the 
Pennsylvania railroad , in common 
with all other creatures of the State, 
is subject to the rule that private 
interest must give way to public 
good. No legislature can suspend 
this rule, nor did the legislature of 
1846 attempt to do it when it passed 
the act of incorporation. It dis- 
tinctly and expressly made the char- 
ter revocable under certain condi- 
tions. 

It must, therefore, be granted that 
the charter of the Pennsylvania rail- 



road Is revocable under the act of 
incorporation and was so at the time 
of the adoption of the constitution 
of 1874. And this being the case, 
this corporation falls within the pow- 
er vested in the General Assembly by 
section 10 of Article XVI of the oon- 
stitution : That is, "to alter, revoke 
or annul any charter of incorporation 
existing and revocable at the adop- 
tion of the constitution, whenever In 
the opinion of the assembly the char- 
ter may be Injurious to the citizens 
of the Commonwealth." This same 
power has been conferred upon the 
Commonwealth by act of assembly, 
and it looks like arrogance from any 
body of individuals to assume the 
power to withstand the arm of the 
government upheld as it is by both 
constitution and law. And this con- 
stitution and law unmistakably per- 
mit the General Assembly to alter, 
revoke or annul the charter, if the 
welfare of the citizens of the Com- 
monwealth demands such action. 

At the beginning I asked the ques- 
tion, "has the State the power to 
interfere with the conduct of the 
Pennsylvania railroad ?" I answer 
thus : By the inalienable right of 
eminent domain the State may at any 
time take the property of this or any 
other corporation for the public good. 
Under the constitution and laws the 
State may revoke, alter or annul the 
charter of this or any corporation 
when the public good demands such 
action. By the express terms of the 
charter of incorporation the State 
may at the end of any twenty-year 
period resume the charter and vest 
the property of the company in the 
people of the Commonwealth. And 
by the terms of the act of Incorpora- 
tion the State may at any time re- 
voke, the charter when it is shown 
that the charter has been violated. 



Crawford Pomona Grange Meeting. 

This Pomona holds its next meet- 
ing with Steuben Grange, Townville, 
June 6 and 7. The Worthy Master 
and Lecturer announce, as usual, a 
good program and a large attendance 
is expected. The drive over the 
country and the pleasures and profits 
from the meeting at this season of 
the year ought not to be missed. 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



21 



STATE GRANGE LIFE INSURANCE-Continued. 

Written for Grange News 




Surplus. 

S THE SURPLUS is likely 
to vary, owing to the 
changeable valueis of in- 
vestments and other con- 
ditions not entirely under 
the control of the manage- 
menit, itt has always been deemed wise 
to keep on hand a portiom of the sur- 
plus as a precaution against emergen- 
cies. After doing this the remainder 
Is usually divided among the mem- 
bens in the succeeding ye^ar, except on 
what are known as Deferred Dividend 
policies where it may be agreed that 
no distribution of surplus shall be 
made until the end of the designated 
periods, and then among the mem- 
bers only who shall be living, 
and whose policies ishall have been 
kept in force. The bulk of the sur- 
plus is an overpayment by the mem- 
bers; money paid with the under- 
standing that it may be needed, but 
probably will not. Of course the 
simplest disposition of the money is 
to pay it back to the members in 
cash, or, what is the same thing to 
allow it in reduction of the next 
premium. If $3.15 be the surplus on 
a policy at the end of the first year, 
and $9.45 at the end of the twenty- 
first year, as will be seen by refer- 
ring to our last article, the company 
•could retain a portion for safety and 
still pay a dividend of ten per cent, 
of $26.35 at the second anniversary 
of the policy, and 25 per cent on the 
twenty-second anniversary. These 
returns to the insured are generally 
known as Dividend or Return Prem- 
iums. 

If any company should place a dif- 
ferent loading upon the net premium 
than in the example used for our il- 
lustration; or if it should base its cal- 
■culations of reserve on a higher rate 
of interest, requiring a smaller re- 
serve, the surplus and dividends would 
be somewhat different from what is 
above indicated. In any case, the 
dividends measure the cost of the in- 
surance, showing in the above ex- 
ample a small reduction from the 
premium named in the policy the 
second year, and a much larger re- 
duction in the twenty-second year. 
Under ordinary circumstances the 
dividends increase with the age of 
the policy owing largely to the in- 
creased amount of reserve bearing in- 
terest at a higher rate than has been 
anticipated in the calculations. 

We have stated above that the first 
and simpler method of paying divi- 
dends is in cash at the first and sub- 
sequent renewals of the oolicy, and 
yet there are other ways of returning 
the divisible surplus to the policy- 
(holders. 



One is to allow the dividends, after 
they shall have been declared, to re- 
main with the company to accumu- 
late at compound interest, t|he entire 
sum to be payable with the policy 
when it shall become a claim. 

Another is to have each declared 
dividend used as a single 'premium 
to purchase such additional insurance 
as the dividend may buy of the com- 
pany, at single premium rates, at 
the attained age. 

Still another is to have the dividend 
shorten the time when the policy 
shall become '-•ayable, so that a policy 
payable at death only, may be paid to 
the insurer earlier. As each dividend 
is ascertained, the company issues a 
definite agreement to pay the policy 
at a specified age, provided it shall 
be kept in force, the time being grad- 
ually shortened by the application of 
dividends on this plan. 

Lastly, dividends in some companies 
may not be declared at an earlier date 
than one fixed in the policy, and 
only to those who shall be living and 
whose policies shall be in force at 
such date. These are known as De- 
ferred Dividend policies, the dividend 
period usually being for twenty years, 
but is sometimes shorter. At the 
end of these periods the Insured has 
a choice of options. The entire ac- 
cumulation of surplus apportioned to 
each policy may be payable in cash; 
or, apolled to secure an annual in- 
come for life; or, to the purchase of 
fully paid-up insurance in addition to 
the amount named in the policy. 

We shall now proceed to consider 
another interesting feature of the 
business. 

Public opinion and statute law alike 
demand^ that a company shall fulfill 
both the letter and spirit of the con- 
tract. On the other hand, no odium 
or legal penalty attaches to any indi- 
vidual member who departs from his 
agreement to pay the premiums as 
stipulated. The company must pay 
the amount insured; the insurer may 
pay the premiums or he may not; 
he suits himself. One of the primary 
ideas of all life insurance is that a 
company will furnish protection to a 
man's family to any amount for which 
he is able and willing to pay. 

The annual premium of $26.35, as 
we have seen, is composed of tliree 
parts, the largest of which is the con- 
tribution to the Reserve Fund. If 
a member wants $1,000 paid to his 
heirs at his deatH, he must continue 
to contribute to this Fund until death. 
If the need or desire tor the protec- 
tion of $1,000 shouM cease, the mem- 
ber stops paying, and a settlement 
may be effected upon a just basis. 

To illustrate : Suppose a member 
insuring at age 35 should wish to ter- 



22 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



minate his insurance at the end of ten 
years. The Reserve Fund in posses- 
sion of the company on his policy 
would amount to $146. Carefully 
constructed tables, such as are used 
by the same company whose premium 
rates were quoted, show that it 
would be entirely just to both the 
company and the insured member 
that for this sum the company upon 
surrender of the original policy 
should issue a new paid up policy, 
payable at death, for $2 70. If a ter- 
mination should take place twenty 
years after date of issue, the Reserve 
of $32 would pay for a paid up pol- 
icy of $521. Thirty years after the 
Reserve would be $523, calling for a 
paid up policy for $709; the Reserve 
Fund increasing each year and the 
amount of paid up insurance increas- 
ing also. Many companies allow the 
member to elect between accepting 
a paid up policy for a reduced 
amount; continuing the original pol- 
icy of $1,000 in force without fur- 
ther payments for as long a time as 
the Reserve will pay; or, allow the 
payment of the Reserve, less a small 
surrender charge, to the insured or 
other owners of the policy in cash. 

We have traced out at considerable 
length the workings of a plain $1,000 
life nolicv issued at age 35. Pre- 
cisely the same principles would be 
brought into operation at other ages. 
The figures would of course be differ- 
ent because afe^he varying rates of 
premium. At all ages below 35 the 
premiums would be smaller because 
the members'ywould have more years 
to live, and hence more premiums to 
pay; while at ages above 35 the prem- 
iums would be larger because of the 
fewer years in which to pay. At 25 
the expectation of life is 39 years, and 
the annual premium is $20; at 70 it 
is 8 years, and the premium is $127. 

For the convenience of the public 
all the companies have tables which 
provide for the concentration of all 
the future payments into a limited 
number, usually ten, fifteen or twenty. 
Of course, the premiums are larger 
than the annual, but are so adjusted 
as to amount and interest that they 
are the exact equivalents of the an- 
nual premiums for life at the same 
age. Again, the principles employed 
in life insurance have been extended 
to include Endowments. These con- 
tracts provide for the payment of the 
amount insured at a given future date 
or prior death. The rates of prem- 
ium vary according to ages and the 
terms for which the policies run; the 
shorter the time the larger the prem- 
ium. 

It will be observed from the fore- 
going analysis that each member pays 
for definite insurance — pays, what it 
actually costs, and pays for it in the 
most convenient and rational man- 
ner. 

In all the ordinary forms of life 



insurance mathematical, medical andi 
business skill have been utilized to- 
perfect a system which is entirely 
just to all the insurers, no matter- 
at what age they enter or at what 
time they die or leave the company; 
and because the system is strict!" 
just and fair it must be permanent. 

Experience has, so far, justified the 
wisdom of adopting and combining- 
the principles which it has been our 
pleasant duty to enunciate. 



A New and Coirmiendable Movement 
— AftTicultiii*al Education. 

A series of practical demonstra- 
tions in corn judging, seed testing, 
stock judging, poultry raising, but- 
ter scoring, etc., will be offered by 
the school of Agriculture of the Penn- 
sylvania State College, December 27, 
1906 to January 2, 1907, inclusive. At 
this time the dormitories and labora- 
tories of the college will be available 
for the accommodation of those who 
will take advantage of the opportu- 
nity offered. 

The rapid growth, from year to 
year, in attendance at these special 
courses of one to two weeks, in other 
States, suggests the farmers' appre- 
ciation of their practical value. The 
enrollment of men frO|m 25 to 70 years: 
of age varied last winter from a few 
hundred to over a thbusand in some 
States, showinp- that men will take 
time to attend these courses, men re- 
turning year after year for the week 
or ten days. 

This course is planned for the 
practical tnan who cannot spare time 
to attend the longer winter courses- 
in Agriculture, Dairying, etc., yet 
wants to learn the latest farm prac- 
tice and something of . the science 
underlyinp- it. 

The exercises will consist of object 
lessons, demonstrations and actual" 
practice in judging of live stock, 
dairy products, corn, etc., with ex- 
planatory lectures, charts, and lantern 
pictures. The College Herds will be 
supplemented by representative ani- 
mals from other herds and in other 
subjects (grains, dairy products, etc.) 
provision will be made for compara- 
tive study of the best products. 
Farmers are invited to bring speci- 
mens of their grain, corn, and dairy 
products, for exhibition and compara- 
tive study. Instructors will point out 
the merits and defects and suggest 
as far as possible methods for im- 
provement. 

The list of instructors will include 
some noted specialists in additon to 
members of tlje agricultural faculty 
of the Pennsylvania State Colleee. 

Prof. H. E. VAN NORMAN, 
State College, Pa. In Charge. 

Dr. W. A. BUCKHOUT, 

Acting Dean School of Agri.QU.lturev 



PENT^SYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



S8 



^xtr pjenn^grlij^^nm (Srtwfl^e l^i^tn^e^^ 



LITTLE BOY BLUE. 

The little toy dog is covered with dust, 

But sturdy and Scalned he stands, 
And the little toy soldier is red with rust 

And his musket molds in his hands. 
Time was when the little toy dog was 
new 

And the soldier was passing fair; 
That was the time when our Little Boy 
Blue 

Kissed them and put them there. 

^'Now don't you go 'til I come," he said, 

"And don't you make, any noise" — 
So, toddling oft to his trundle bed. 

He dreamt of the pretty toys. 
And as he was dreaming, an angel song 

Awakened our Little Boy Blue — 
Oh, the years are many, the years are 
long. 

But the little toy friends are true! 

Aye, faithful to Little Boy Blue they 
stand. 
Each in the same old place — 
Awaiting the touch of a little hand. 

The smile of a little face. 
And they wonder, as waiting the long 
years thro' 
In the dust of that little chair — 
What has become of our Little Boy Blue. 
Since he kissed them and put them 
there. 

Eugene Field. 



Co-operative Soil and Fertilizer Tests. 

. The Pennsylvania Experiment Sta- 
tion is carrying on a series of co- 
operative fertilizer experiments with 
farmers in various parts of the State 
to determine requirements of soils 
and to enable the farmer-experiment- 
er to determine which of the three 
principal types of commercial ferti- 
lizer should be applied to corn and 
wheat crops. The experiment is not 
■designed to show what Is the best 
<iuantity of either fertilizer; this must 
<jome from further experimenting. 
To encourage co-operation in these 
tests the station announces through 
the press that they will supply the 
fertilizer free to the first 100 appli- 
<;ants, of whom not more than ten 
.shall reside In any one county. These 
are required to carry on the test in 
Accordance with the station's direc- 
tions and report detailed results. 
More than 250 applications were re- 
ceived in less than two weeks and it 
Is noteworthy that they are mostly 
from the districts where commercial 
fertilizers are not much used. 



The Butter Color Question. 

The "Grocery World" wishes to be 
permitted to prophesy that tbe com- 
ing pure food issue will be the use 
of artificial color in butter. Thia con- 
flict has been shaping itself for many 
months and unmistakable signs mul- 
tiply that its settlemerjt cannot long 
be deferred. 

The use of color in butter dates 
almost from the beginning of the 
industry. Very early it waa dis- 
covered that the natural winter feed 
of the cows produced milk that in 
t-rn yielded butter of a pure white 
hue, which was unsatisfying after the 
golden product of the summer. So 
the simple farmers of that day fed 
their cows carrots that their milk 
might impart to butter the necessarv 
June tint. 

From that time down to the inven- 
tion of commercial butter colors was 
a direct progression, and the use of 
colors is now practically universal. 
Indeed, it is recognized as such by 
certain United States statutes. 

Legally, the makers of colored but- 
ter under present food laws have 
hardly a leg to stand on. In the 
first place, If they use coal-tar 
colors which give the best results 
and are generally used, they are em- 
ploying an injurious ingredient. If 
they use vegetable colors, which ar^ 
harmless, but much less efficient, 
they then are probably guilty of hav- 
ing colored their product "so as to 
make it appear better and of greater 
value than it really is." ^o than on 
one horn of the dilemma they are 
reasonably sure to be impaled, once 
the authorities begin a general cam- 
paign. 

Preventing the use of butter color 
could scarce work more than a purely 
ethical benefit, since there Is no evi- 
dence that anybody has ever or could 
ever be harmed by it. On the con- 
trary, by restoring oleo toa _cjcmipeti-L_ 
tive position the elimination of but- 
ter color would prove a serious men- 
ace to the entire butter industry. 
Oleo now Is mostly white, and so is 
easily distinguishable from yellow 
butter. That is the latter's only 
safeguard against fraudulent com- 
petition. Make butter also white and 
there will be no more a'^parent dif- 
ference between the products than 
there was when both were colored. 
Result, oleo will again flourish like a 
green bay tree, on the same stolen 
sapital that gave It prosperity before. 



The Grange teaches "'right living." 
No one has ever yet been in;|ure(J 
by heeding these precepts, 



24 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



Mixed Wives. 

In the early part of the last cen- 
tury there lived in an old New Ensr- 
land town a Mr. Church who, in the 
course of his earthly life was bereft 
of four wives, all of whom were 
buried in the same lot. In his old 
age it became necessar'"^ to remove 
the remains to a new cemetery. 
This he undertook himself, but in 
the process the bones became hope- 
lessly mixed. His "New England 
conscience" would not allow him, 
under the painful circumstances to 
use the original headstones, so he pro- 
cured new ones, one of which bore 
the folowing inscription : 

"Here lies Hannah Church and 
probably a portion of Emily." 

Another : 

"Sacred to the memory of Emilv 
Church who seems to be mixed with 
Matilda." 

Then followed these lints : 
"Stranger, pause and drop a tear; 
For Emily Church lies buried here, 
Mixed in some perplexing manner 
With Mary, Matilda and probably 

Hannah." — Harper's Weekly. 



roof is to be raised and a second 
story added this spring, which will 
make it the best Hall in this com- 
munity. 



Of the 105 counties in Kansas 
eighty-five are without a pauper, 
twenty-five have no poorhouses, and 
thirty-seven have not a criminal case 
on the docket. In Kansas, women 
have had full municipal suffrage 
since 1887. If during these eighteen 
years women had neglected their 

homes for politics, as the o 'nents 

of equal rights prophesy that they 
will, half the men in Kansas would 
have been brought to the poorhouse 
by lack of thrift and domestic indus- 
try on the part of their wives, and 
the rising generation for want of 
motherh^ care, would have gone 
astrav and filled tlie prisons to over- 
flowing. Just the opposite has hap- 
pened. This is another illustration 
of the fact that "it is idle to argue 
from prophecy wben we can argue 
from history." 

ALICE STONE BLACKWELL. 



Another Story. 

A good literary program helps 
make interesting meetings in Central 
Grange, No. 1216, Potter County, on 
the second and fourth Tuesdays of 
each month. Questions pertaining to 
Grange, home and farm work are dis- 
cussed with much interest and boun- 
tiful suppers are frequently served as 
there are candidates to initiate at 
every meeting. The Worthy Master 
takes much pride in making his 
Grange a great success and in helping 
to better the conditons of the neigb- 
borhood. Needing more room, the 



CO-OPERATION. 

"Help one another," the snowflakes said,. 
As they cuddled down in their fleecy bed; 
"One of us here would not be felt. 
One of us here would quicKly melt; 
But I'll help you and you'll help me, 
And then what a big, white drift we'll 
see." 

'^Help one another," the maple spray 
Said to its fellow leaves one day; 
"The sun would wither nte here alone. 
Long enough ere the day is gone; 
But I'll help you and you'll help me, 
And then what a splendid shade there'll 
be!" 

"Help one another," the "dewdrop cried. 
Seeing another drop close by Its side; 
"This warm south breeze would drive 

me away, 
And I should be gone 'ere noon to-day; 
But I'll help you and you'll help me. 
And we'll make a brook and run to the 

sea." 

"Help one another," a grain of sand 
Said to another grain just at hand; 
"The wind may carry me over the sea, 
And then, oh, what will become of me? 
But come, my brother, give me your 

hand; 
We'll build a mountain and there we'll 

stand." 



Resohitions Speaking Out. 

Whereas : Our taxes have in- 
creased threefold since the advent of 
industrial corporations into our 
township and county, and as these 
corporations while enjoying great 
prosperity pay no local tax and only 
a trifling pittance of State tax, while- 
our farm tax has reached 4 per cent, 
which being now a fair rate of in- 
terest for the use of money, is plainly 
confiscation and is equivalent to the 
renting of our own farms from the 
government. 

Therefore, be it resolved : That 
we, the members of Sharon Grange, 
No. 1247, P. of H., of Potter County, 
in regular session assembled, do de- 
nounce our present tax system as un- 
just and oppressive to farmers and 
all other individual property owners, 
while showing a flagrant favorism to- 
railroads and other corporations, and 
in the interest of justice and fair 
dealing we demand that the State tax 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



25 



iaws be revised and equalized in a 
way that will require all property, 
whether individual or corporate, to 
bear its just and proper share of tax- 
ation. To secure this just demand 
we appeal to the citizens of our State 
who believe in a square deal, and 
particularly to our brother farmers. 
And be it further resolved : 

That we will support no candidate 
for Member of Asembly who will not 
pledge his best effort to the revision 
and equalization of our tax law. 

The resolutions were heartily en- 
dorsed by the Grange as a body and 
placed upon the minutes of the meet- 
ing. 

We wish every Grange and every 
taxpayer throughout the State would 
be with us on this issue and see if 
some change could not be brougTit 
about in our present system of tax- 
ation which would be of benefit to 
the individual property owner, and 
there can be if the brother farmers 
only realize what a power they are 
when acting in unison. 

H. L. PEARSALL, 
CHARLES ALLEX, 
G. D. APPLEBY, 
Leg. Com., Sharon Grange, 

Potter County. 



How would it do for members of 
each Subordinate Grange to plant 
gourd seed this spring. A variety of 
them would furnisli excellent decora- 
tions for use at initiations by the 
court ladies. We have used some 
two winters at Wellaboro Grange. 
Very fraternally, 

E. R. MULFORD. 



Untaxed Commercial Alcohol. 

The wood alcohol industry as estab- 
lished in the United States was the out- 
come of impoliiic and unjust taxation. 
The excessive tax on grain alcohol drove 
manufacturers to the expedient of secur- 
ing a less costly and poisonous untaxed 
substitute by slashing down the trees. 
It is important to the future welfare of 
the country that the forest growths 
should be conserved and protected. The 
manufacture of wood alcohol, as long as 
It shall be continued, keeps alive an 
agency of destruction. Now that the In- 
dustry is established there Is the usual 
outcry against any change in the tax 
laws which would make It no longer 
profitable. The removal of the tax on 



grain alcohol for use for manufacturing, 
lighting and deodorizing purposes Is stout- 
ly resisted by all the makers and ven- 
ders of more costly and dangerous sub- 
stitutes. 

The farmers of the country ought to 
make themselves felt In the agitation for 
the repeal of the tax on alcohol. They 
are largely Interested. Alcohol can be 
made from potatoes, beets, corn, corn- 
stalks and other products of the farm. 
According to estimates made by Secre- 
tary Wilson "on an acre of land that 
produces fifty bushels of corn there can 
be made from Its com 140 and from Its 
cornstalks 170 gallons of commercial al- 
cohol. At the rate of 50 cents a gallon 
that would be $155 worth. He calculated 
that from an acre of such potatoes as are 
grown abroad for cattle feed there might 
be made 500 gallons of aloahol, or, at the 
rate of 50 cents, S250 worth. These fig- 
ures Indicate how largely, If by the re- 
moval of the tax the market for alcohol 
were allowed to grow, the profits of ag- 
riculture might be Incres^ied. The farhi- 
ers would also find untaxed alcohol both 
cheaper than and a marked Improvement 
over kerosene for lighting purposes, and 
over gasoline as a motor fuel for the In- 
ternal combusion engln«8 which, In re- 
cent years, have come Intd wide use on 
American farms. 

It Is better to turn the products of 
the Held to more profitable use than to 
longer unnecessarily destroy the forests 
In the effort to escape the Injurious re- 
sult of unwise taxation. 



The Philadelphia "Press" quotes a 
naturalist as saying that "if the world 
were birdless man could not inhabit 
it after nine years' time in spite of 
all the sprays and poisons that could 
be manufactured for the destruction 
of insects. The insects and slugd 
would simply eat all the orchards 
and crops in that time." The value 
of the wild birds to humanity should 
be taught in every school. 



The International Chamber of Agri- 
culture. 

The proclamation of Victor Eman- 
uel III, King of Italy, proposing the 
meeting of an International Congress 
of Agriculture which took place last 
year at Rome is on my table. Our 
country was represented by our State 
Master, Bro. W. F. Hill, Dr. A. F. 
Woods and U. S. Ambassador, Henry 
V. White. 

Victor Emanuel uses this expression 
in his address as one of the reasons 
for getting the farmers of the world 
together : "Agriculture alone is with- 



26 



PENNSYLVANIA GRANGE NEWS 



out that solidarity, that directing 
power, which alone is potent in the 
economic warfare to-day. Agrricul- 
ture not only needs organization In a 
given locality, but in all localities and 
all these organizations united into a 
federation which should guide and 
direct, without which the isolated 
unions are impotent." 

Is this not truthful and sensible ? 
The King proceeds further and shows 
many reasons why the farmers of the 
world should meet and after a careful 
consideration of the whole matter 
I am convinced that it would be of 
great advantage to the farming inter- 
ests to have an interchange of ideas. 
This would include economic ques- 
tions, distribution of products, immi- 
gration and non-immigration, trans-, 
portatlon, etc. 

The men of the shipping trust of 
the world know each other. The fi- 
nanciers and the railroad men, but the 
farmers that make prosperity are un- 
acquainted. 

For these reasons I believe it would 
be well for our government to take 
hold of this matter and see that this 
international congress of agriculture 
is continued. 

The National Grange should get 
some of its cobwebs unwcJund and 
take hold of this matter. It will re- 
sult in great good. Worthy National 
Master, Bro. Batchelder, what say 
you ? 



The Grange National Bank of Patton, 

Cambria County, has bought the 
choicest property in that thriving 
boro and will fix up a banking room 
wit